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  1. #76
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    Mar 2015
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    My mileage rolled over the 130,000 mark on the way home from work this past Friday, so the 135i was due for another day in the garage come Saturday. I've been using OCIs of 3,000-4,000 miles, and as much as I drive, that comes along often. I should buy stock in Motul. In addition to the routine oil change, I'd also noticed some slight coming from the front wheel bearings when turning. They certainly looked rough, so I figured I'd preventively go ahead and change those out before the problem got any worse.

    For a little under $300 from FCPEuro, I was able to get two front hub assemblies, 8 new bolts (these are supposedly non-reusable and the new ones come pre loaded with thread locking compound, and 2 new brake disc set screws.

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    As always, grabbed my trusty BMS 17mm wheel socket so I don't scratch up the ARC-8s. I've also been pleasantly surprised at how well my powder coated calipers have held up as the mileage adds up. They still look like the day I received them back from finishing.

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    After removing the front wheels, I took the time to get out my tire tread measurement tool to see how the Firestones were holding up. 6/32nds on the fronts, and 5/32nds on the rear. I've put about 25,000 miles on this set, so they're holding up pretty well. It doesn't look like they'll last as long as the Hankook V12 Evo2s I had previously, but the Firestone do grip better in dry/wet, and look better too.

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    Prior to starting the wheel bearing DIY, I found this extremely helpful video showing the exact steps. The process to the E82 is just like the E90 and bolt sizes are the same as well.



    Removal of the old wheel bearings started with removing the brake caliper, rotor, and then starting the process of removing the 4 bolts on the backside of the hub assembly. It might not be completely necessary, by I removed the wheel speed sensor to gain some more room as well. This was not the easiest area to photograph.

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    These bolts are very very hard to remove. They have thread locking material from the factory, and take a lot of effort to remove. There wasn't really enough room to get power tools in there unfortunately, so I just had to use patience and a few different 18mm bolt removal tools. The old ones had seem better days aesthetically, and looked like they need a refreshment.

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    The Apex wheel stud kit was also fused with the old hub assemblies, so I switched back to normal wheel bolts. They had tarnished into a rusted look anyways, so I was glad to see them go. It's easier to mount wheels with studs, but the rusty look of the studs wasn't for me.

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    This is prior to installing the new hub assembly:

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    And afterwards:

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    Before starting up the car, I added 7 quarts of Motul.

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    I also fastened down the Craftsman socket set I received in the boot. I felt vulnerable traveling with no tools in this car, and received this as a Christmas gift. The well organized plastic case made it a perfect candidate for staying in the car in case of emergencies.

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    Now she's ready to return to daily duties!

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    In fact, the very next day my wife, Winston, and I set off for a little Sunday drive into the Pisgah National Forest for a long hike, followed by a stop by Sierra Nevada brewery for a few beers, before heading home for the evening. Here’s a few other shots I took, as well as a little montage I made of the day’s activities. I’ve been looking for excuses to use the S&Q function on the Sony A7iii.

    Constantly making great memories in the 1er.

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    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Even though it's only been 40 days since my last update, this E82 road warrior has racked up nearly 4,500 miles in that time, bringing the odometer up to 133,000 and counting. In North Carolina, that has meant some pretty cold weather recently. That used to mean rough starts on higher concentrations of E85, but after BMS revised their cold start tables on their back end flashes, things are now OEM smooth.





    Eventually the 30's gave way to even colder temperatures, and on one particularly frigid morning in the mountains, a single digit cold start was the last bit of energy my battery had left to give. Seeing as how this was still the original, I knew it was only a matter of time before I would have to find a replacement. Daily driving this car plus the intelligent battery sensor really seemed to have stretched the life of the OEM battery which lasted over 10 years.


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    Before swapping out the dead battery, I performed another routine oil change with Motul and a Mann.


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    Without too much trouble, I managed to get the old OEM battery out and sat it beside the Interstate replacement to compare. I was relieved to find out they were identical sizes.


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    I wasn't interested in coding the battery -- only registering, so I went with something with a similar aH rating and non-AGM. The Interstate Mega-Tron Plus MTP-49/H8-1 is 100aH versus 90aH of the OEM, and packs more cold cranking amps and reserve minutes.


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    15 minutes later and I had everything secured, terminals tightened down, and was ready to register the battery -- which was as simple as opening up the MHD app, going to reset adaptations, and registering the battery.


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    Before finishing up, I also swapped out the third brake light and added a matte black 135i emblem. This is my 4th brake light, and although the vinyl tint made the third one last longer than the previous two, it still managed to crack on the tops and bottom enough to bother me.


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    I ordered this purposely through FCP Euro, so I'll be interested to see if they warranty the part the next time it breaks, which it almost certainly will.


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    I have a very busy next month or so, but getting some dyno time will be a priority in March.
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    His oil analysis:

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