Close

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 76 to 100 of 100
  1. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    42
    Rep Points
    263.0
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    3


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by cmg5461 Click here to enlarge
    What do you think causes the bolt to back out? Click here to enlarge
    A proper test would be to paint mark the hub and bolt and wait for a failure to occur w/ camera on it.
    might be waiting a while....

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    64
    Rep Points
    169.1
    Mentioned
    21 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    2


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Flinchy Click here to enlarge
    That's the million dollar question. Exactly what. I think most people are thinking it isn't actually the accessory load at this point.

    Vibration caused by something? As above Tony had it happen with everything otherwise standard just more power+torque output.
    Why can't we just put some loctite in it and call it a day? If it were vibrations.

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    73
    Rep Points
    314.0
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    4


    4 out of 4 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    Generally these failures leave bent valves and the crank bolt loose enough to turn with fingers. I've never heard of anyone catching the n54 before valves got bent. It seems the S55 failures often get caught before damage occurs. So the question is how the crank bolt comes loose. If the bolt vibrates loose or otherwise loosens on its own, the locking plate will prevent problems. If the bolt is loosened by torque on the pulley/hub assembly, the locking plate won't save you.
    The point cmg5461 is making is that the pulley/hub could theoretically slip just a tad without loosening the crank bolt. The pulley and hub are held together with 6 bolts, they will turn as one assembly. Without the plate, the pulley/hub isn't locked to the crank bolt, so maybe the hub can slip just a few degrees and the bolt won't loosen. If you have the locking plate attached, the bolt is locked to the pulley/hub. This means that any slip of the hub assembly will certainly loosen the crank bolt, ensuring engine damage.
    Here's the thing. If the pulley/hub slips at all, the timing chain sprocket will slip with it. Any slip of the hub will certainly throw off timing. My personal bet is that any slip of the hub will almost certainly loosen the crank bolt, even without the locking plate. You have at least seven years of pressure and road spray bonding them together.
    In short, the crank bolt capture will prevent your bolt from vibrating loose. It won't save you from torque on the pulley or hub, insufficient clamping force, or slips that occur even with a tight bolt. We don't know whether the crank bolt loosens and allows the hub to slip, or a slipping hub loosens the crank bolt. The net result is the same either way. The crank bolt capture addresses one possible failure mode, so I think I'll pick one up. Slipped timing is always bad, I seriously doubt this plate would increase the chances of bent valves.
    Has anybody caught slipped timing on an N54 before engine damage occured?

    I thought about using red loctite or rocksett, but you aren't supposed to use it on stretch bolts since it can change torque values. I would still be tempted to use it, though it would require locking timing and replacing the crank bolt and friction washer.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    208
    Rep Points
    656.0
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    7


    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    If I were really that concerned about it I would tack weld the bolt head, however I haven't heard of many n54's with the issue. I'm not saying there aren't any I just haven't heard about them.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Down Under
    Posts
    753
    Rep Points
    1,111.1
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    12


    Yes Reputation No
    There was a shop here in Melbourne that built a new engine for one of my mates, I told him about this and he and the shop laughed and said they never heard of such a thing happening.

    Got a call yesterday, guess what happen and where do I get that crank bolt capture you told me about.

    Big dollar motor too.
    Bmw 1 series M 11.4@127mph

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    208
    Rep Points
    656.0
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    7


    Yes Reputation No
    That sucks. Maybe its good just for the cheap insurance but I still think a couple of tack welds would accomplish the same thing...maybe I'm wrong.

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    73
    Rep Points
    314.0
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    4


    Yes Reputation No
    I would be concerned about putting that much heat into a stretch bolt. Would a tack weld ruin the temper of the bolt?

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    208
    Rep Points
    656.0
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    7


    Yes Reputation No
    I only know what has worked in the past on other engines with the same issues

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by cmg5461 Click here to enlarge
    After further dissection, I believe this is not a solution to the crank bolt loosening issues. I believe this will accelerate the issue of crank bolts loosening.

    Please read my entire analysis:

    The crank bolt is torqued CLOCKWISE. The engine spins CLOCKWISE. This is inherently bad for keeping bolts torqued. I believe the issue is the inertia from the accessories - by downshifting, you are applying a COUNTERCLOCKWISE torque to the crank pulley via accessory belt. The net torque acting over a time interval is the angular impulse. The shorter the duration, the higher the torque applied to this crank pulley. This is how impact guns work and why they are so good at breaking bolts loose.

    This solution is connecting the crank bolt to that pulley. By adding this part, you are essentially increasing the lever arm (torque acted upon this bolt) and inflicting higher torque (by impulse) directly to the crank bolt. Impulse is what works this bolt loose. Unfortunately, BMW did not make this bolt reverse thread, which would not have an issue in the first place. Remember - the bolt is the only thing holding the crank pulley on. By connecting this bolt and pulley, you are sending the torque from the accessory belt directly to the crank bolt. If this solution was not installed, you have the friction between crankshaft surface, outer bolt head surface and thread torque holding this mechanism together. Engineering design states that stretch bolts apply 50% of their torque as force through the bolt head and 10% through the threads. By making the pulley and bolt rigid, you are REMOVING half of the friction surface holding this bolt on. The crank pulley can now directly spin the bolt resulting in catastrophic failure.

    I really hope I am overthinking this and I am proved wrong.

    Tony, do you have any FMEA studies done to prove this wrong? If my analysis is correct, we could have a very large problem on our hands..
    I want to revive a thread since I am interested in getting a CBC but I don't want to purchase this if it will cause more harm than good. Since Tony@VTT is back now I would love to hear his response on this issue.

    For me after reading what cmg5461 wrote and looking at some diagrams of the hub assembly I understand the issue a little bit better, I could be wrong but here is my interpretation. Since the hub is essentially a multi-piece setup (hub body, friction disk, and timing gear) all pinched together with the crank bolt each piece is susceptible to spin and the failures can occur like so:

    1) Either the timing gear spins separately from the rest of the assembly and causes timing to be thrown off.
    2) The hub itself spins separately from the crank which also can mess up timing
    3) The bolt backs out

    In scenario 1 and 2 if the part spins it can be likely the bolt doesnt back out and as a result only timing is thrown off, and if it isn't too bad the crank position sensor can catch this and limp mode the car and shut it off to save the motor. If only scenario 3 occurs and the slip as a result is minor then the car again can detect this and save the motor. However if the crank bolt backs out simultaneously then the slip can be exacerbated this essentially means that timing can be thrown off so badly there is no saving the motor and catastrophic engine failure occurs.

    Ok now that the issue as I know it is out of the way I want to discuss what the VTT CBC is doing and my interpretation of cmg5461's talking points.

    Since most spun hub issues according to VTT is caused by the bolt backing out, preventing it from backing out solves issue 3. However since the crank pulley is held onto the hub itself by 6 or 8 screws (depending on N54 or S55) torque from revving up during downshift caused by the inertia of the accessory components acts in the counter clockwise direction on the crank pulley which has the potential to cause the main hub to slip. In the even that it does slip without the CBC installed the crank bolt likely will stay torqued and you get scenario 2. However when the VTT crank bolt capture is installed just like cmg5461 stated, it fixes the pulley + crank bolt + crank hub together because the pulley and crank bolt capture are held to the crank hub by the 6 screws, and the center capture portion holds the crank bolt itself. This means if the torque from downshifts as aforementioned occurs it will spin the the crank hub counter clock wise as well which means it is being loosened and this can actually exacerbate the issue since now we have scenario 2 and 3 in play.


    However as pointed out later in this thread and a saving point is that the bolt cannot back out if the 6 or 8 screws in place even if the pulley slips counter clockwise. This means that if the hub slips slightly counterclockwise it will want to loosen the crank bolt but the crank bolt can't back out since the capture is preventing it from spinning, and since the capture is held onto the pulley and crank hub does this mean the nature of the bolt being prevented from backing up also prevent the hub from wanting to spin counter clockwise and thus slipping? The only way this can be true is if the tolerances between the crank bolt capture and the crankbolt against the pulley is tight enough and the material itself is strong enough it wont flex or allow the bolt to back out even a mm or less.

    That's what my concern is and I hope VTT will address it.


    Another concern is since it is adding weight, no matter how little it weighs it is still adding weight. How bad will this mess up crank harmonics? which in itself can cause more issues. And do you have any test data? This is pretty important.

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    38
    Rep Points
    157.3
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    2


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by F87Source Click here to enlarge
    ...That's what my concern is and I hope VTT will address it....
    How bad will this mess up crank harmonics? which in itself can cause more issues. And do you have any test data? This is pretty important.
    Good (although winded) summary, but:
    1) How to expect them to "address" it?
    2) What do you know about crank harmonics in general, and about the the internal balance of the N54? Would you even understand the answer?
    3) What "test" data are you looking for? A balance sheet, graphs, or someones word over the internet?
    Not to be rude but it just seemed like you came in hard, barely understanding the issue, and started throwing skeptical accusations out there. Maybe I'm just in a bad mood Click here to enlarge

  11. #86
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    1) I'd like to see some testing data: how stuff the plate itself is because that will determine if the crank bolt backing out will deform the plate or actually be held in a fixed position. How well the screws actually hold the late fixed because the holes are slotted and can allow for some play.

    2) I could care less about the N54's crank harmoics, i'm only in this thread because it's seen more discussion than the s55 thread. But in general crank pulleys are designed to be perfectly balanced and damped any harmonics from damaging the rotating assembly. That's why light weight crank pulleys without any rubber to dampen vibrations are known to cause damage, it's hugely prevalent in the Subaru world. Balance testing would be nice as well since both the VTT splock and CBC have little to no data backing up any claims, and there's alot of people saying the splock has machining errors and some have splines that even disintegrate before it locks into the crank.

    3) balance testing, stiffness testing, and if possible test if it's possible that the crank bolt becomes loosened when the hub spins. I'm skeptical about these solutions because there is so little data published, only vtt saying it's light so it should cause an issue with balance or harmonics which isn't necessarily true just because it's light, also the splock doesn't have any images of it biting into the crank only vtt saying it does and how they have broken cranks in testing. Not trying to be harsh on vtt since they make great stuff for good prices, but I've seen the entire s55 community get screwed by tpg and their $#@! crank hub "solution" which caused more damage than it solved.

    I've been reading this thread since it was released but never got to ask since exactly at this time vtt left this forum. I understand the issue of the crank slipping but these points that op brought up are a valid concern which is why I'm bringing it back up. Maybe you should think more about what he said, and learn about what adding mass to the crank can do.

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    38
    Rep Points
    157.3
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    2


    Yes Reputation No
    1) So you're doubting the structural integrity of the bolt capture material and are wondering if it would deflect (in which direction)? Or are you doubting that the clamping force from the 6 smaller bolts won't be enough to stop it from sliding within the notches? I guess that's a fair question.

    2) I agree, the lightweight pulley that one company created (at one point) for the N54 was a horrible idea. But I have yet to seen anyone saying that it's disintegrated upon install, is there any pictures? If so that's not good lol... I know that they recently increased the hardness (to tool steel) and changed the spline design.

    3) What would be a passable balance test, or stiffness test? I don't know if the OEM crank hubs are even balanced from the factory (when ordered as replacements). They have actually released pictures of the spline interference (cutting) into the crank. It's in a few of the threads.

    I'm also not sure that the splock is adding any mass? Maybe I'm thinking about it wrong, but it's a direct replacement for the OEM crank hub; it's just getting rid of the two piece stock design, and adding a spline to the end.
    Edit: Also I'm not trying to argue/be a dick simply for the sake of arguing. Just trying to think through your questions.

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    1) yeah because it's such a light piece does that mean it's super flexible? If so that's bad. I'm worried that when the crank bolt backs out it will force the hub outwards with it, and if the capture is too flexible it'll give out. The next issue is if the hub can spin slightly since the bolt holes are slotted, this is because depending on how the central crank bolt is torqued it can be twisted in such a way that the 6 screws mounting the pulley will not line up with the capture, so they had to slot the bolt holes in the capture to increase compatibility, even then it's still not perfect since some cars have a crank bolt that's torqued in such a way none of the holes line up. So my fear is if the mounting bolts don't offer enough clamping force (and friction) between the crank bolt capture and pulley it can shift a but to the left or right allowing the crank bolt to slip. The method that would eliminate this issue is making the crank bolt capture specific to the pulley mounting bolts, but that would be difficult as each car would be a bit different.

    2) no images just claims so it's unknown if they're legitimate, but if vtt redesigned the spline and had new material used then it could have been a legitimate issue. Again no evidence for the spline disintegrating but no evidence from vtt that the splock even bit into the crank, so only claims on both sides which isn't promising.

    3) Well balance test it to at minimum 7,500 rpm (the s55 revs that high) and if possible 10,000 rpm and check for vibration and harmonics. If it's ok at that speed then great, but the perfect test would be having the whole crank + crank hub + pulley assembly to check if it's balanced ok. For defection have the crank bolt be pressed against the middle of the capture with the respective number of bolts holding the capture. This will give you force required, then you could calculate the torque that is then required to back the hub bolt out and deflect the capture. This number will allow you to see if that's under what the bolt even needs to back out normally which would be a bad result. Or far higher than what is required for the bolt to normally back out which is good.


    Not the splock the CBC is adding mass, and adding any massing to a balanced crank is bad. It's like 36.8 grams which is quite significant for something that spins up to 7500 rpm. However the crank bolt capture is fairly symetrical which is a good thing.


    Yeah no worries, critiques makes sure that I'm not making any mistakes. Keep them up, the more analysis the better.

  14. #89
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    700
    Rep Points
    1,815.4
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    19


    Yes Reputation No
    There are two major causes of a slipped hub;

    1: Bolt backing out
    2: Actual hub slip (insufficient friction).

    The CBC addresses the first issue; it is nothing more than a fastener retention device. This really is just a BMW specific application of a very commonly used method of retaining fasteners. At the end of the day what does it do? Ensure the bolt can't vibrate out.

    The spline lock attacks the other side of the problem; driving it into the crank snout with features (aggressive features) that lock the hub to the crank.

    Together they form a complete solution.

    A few points in no particular order:
    • The CBC is very rigid. I'm not sure why you'd think otherwise and would suggest inspecting one before forming opinions on the physical properties.
    • The CBC allows no movement of the crank bolt. If it moves, you already are having a bad day. The slots aren't for movement, they're for flexibility in installation. Once everything it torqued down it doesn't move.
    • Doing backwards calculations to determine CBC flexion to determine torque holding capability of the system is absolutely incorrect on every level that I can think of and a couple that I hadn't thought of before. Which leads me to...
    • Respectfully, I can explain it to you but I cannot understand it for you


    The CBC has now been out for a very long time; well regarded, no issues reported that I'm aware of, part of the standard means of dealing with the dreaded S55 slipped crank hub, which the other BMW motors we know and love are also susceptible to. The spline lock is the other necessary part of the equation.

    Fortunately if you personally feel the CBC is not needed or helpful, you don't have to install one on your vehicle -same for spline lock. Many people get by just fine with no fix and haven't had a slipped hub. Those that have, however, especially know the value of addressing the factory engineering shortcomings.

    Cheers,
    Chris
    Chris - VTT Forum Representative
    Chris@Vargasturbo.com
    www.Vargasturbo.com
    Click here to enlarge

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Chris@VargasTurboTech Click here to enlarge
    There are two major causes of a slipped hub;

    1: Bolt backing out
    2: Actual hub slip (insufficient friction).

    The CBC addresses the first issue; it is nothing more than a fastener retention device. This really is just a BMW specific application of a very commonly used method of retaining fasteners. At the end of the day what does it do? Ensure the bolt can't vibrate out.

    The spline lock attacks the other side of the problem; driving it into the crank snout with features (aggressive features) that lock the hub to the crank.

    Together they form a complete solution.

    A few points in no particular order:
    • The CBC is very rigid. I'm not sure why you'd think otherwise and would suggest inspecting one before forming opinions on the physical properties.
    • The CBC allows no movement of the crank bolt. If it moves, you already are having a bad day. The slots aren't for movement, they're for flexibility in installation. Once everything it torqued down it doesn't move.
    • Doing backwards calculations to determine CBC flexion to determine torque holding capability of the system is absolutely incorrect on every level that I can think of and a couple that I hadn't thought of before. Which leads me to...
    • Respectfully, I can explain it to you but I cannot understand it for you


    The CBC has now been out for a very long time; well regarded, no issues reported that I'm aware of, part of the standard means of dealing with the dreaded S55 slipped crank hub, which the other BMW motors we know and love are also susceptible to. The spline lock is the other necessary part of the equation.

    Fortunately if you personally feel the CBC is not needed or helpful, you don't have to install one on your vehicle -same for spline lock. Many people get by just fine with no fix and haven't had a slipped hub. Those that have, however, especially know the value of addressing the factory engineering shortcomings.

    Cheers,
    Chris
    Thanks for your reply Chris, I'm not an engineer just trying to expand on the point others have brought up, and I'm extremely paranoid after seeing what TPG's crank hub "fix" did on the S55. I'm not trying to bash on VTT far from it, I actually like the company (I like what you guys are doing for the N55, excellent performance minus the bmw ///M tax) and I like how Tony is brutally honest. I just wanted to get more info because like I said before TPG scared me for life on this issue and now I have to be extra careful when I look for products on this issue.

    1) I was just assuming it could be susceptible to flexing since it was so light and made from aluminium, again there was no real data and I didn't want to buy a product without the full details.

    2) I'm still concerned that if enough force it put on the capture it can cause it to slip since there are slots for the bolt.

    3) Still doesnt answer how well this thing is balanced + harmonics when added to the crank because adding any mass to the crank could be bad.


    Yes I agree, I have heard no bad things about the CBC regardless of how extensively I looked, I just wanted to make sure prior concerns from the OP were addressed incase issues don't pop up short term.

    In regards to the SPLOCK I have heard things go wrong with that, such as the splines not being hard enough to cut the crank and just breaking apart before doing anything, which is why images would be nice. Since this is the cheapest and least intrusive solution imo as you dont have to drill the crank.

    There were also rumors from another company that the timing gear was cut imprecisely and cause issues, with this claim I believe this company has had history with VTT and got mad when you guys couldn't sell them enough CBC's or something and may just be going after you as revenge so this claim could be total BS.


    Overall I really want the CBC, SPLOCK later on since I would like a reputable shop that has done this install before to perform it for me and in my area there is no one. So just wanted a bit more information before I proceed.

  16. #91
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    700
    Rep Points
    1,815.4
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    19


    Yes Reputation No
    You're going to have to add something up there to stop the bolt from vibrating loose -we
    made the CBC as light as we could make it to minimize any added rotating weight to the motor and still have the strength characteristics needed.

    It really just adds a (large) degree of safety ensuring the crank bolt will not vibrate out. Remember the crank bolt is torqued 75 ft lbs plus 270* (for our hub installation), which is quite a bit of stretch on that thread pitch. The CBC doesn't see much torque; it would only see torque of crank bolt moving relative to assembly (should never happen). Again, it's a fastener retention device, not a torque transfer device. Part of the complete solution when used with the spline lock.

    As for the spline lock, check out the evidence of installation on the straight cut spline lock: Click here to enlarge

    Chris
    Chris - VTT Forum Representative
    Chris@Vargasturbo.com
    www.Vargasturbo.com
    Click here to enlarge

  17. #92
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Posts
    1,789
    Rep Points
    3,520.3
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    36


    0 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Chris@VargasTurboTech Click here to enlarge
    You're going to have to add something up there to stop the bolt from vibrating loose -we
    made the CBC as light as we could make it to minimize any added rotating weight to the motor and still have the strength characteristics needed.

    It really just adds a (large) degree of safety ensuring the crank bolt will not vibrate out. Remember the crank bolt is torqued 75 ft lbs plus 270* (for our hub installation), which is quite a bit of stretch on that thread pitch. The CBC doesn't see much torque; it would only see torque of crank bolt moving relative to assembly (should never happen). Again, it's a fastener retention device, not a torque transfer device. Part of the complete solution when used with the spline lock.

    As for the spline lock, check out the evidence of installation on the straight cut spline lock: Click here to enlarge

    Chris
    This v2 etching looks very good and IMO if that is repeatable then that hub should not be going anywhere. Also like that you decided to go with the straight spline, as we and some others had suggested a while back while debunking the initial theory/marketing of the tapered splines "digging deeper if attempt to slip (as would a spline lock tool)"- based on a static assembled component depth we know this was just not possible.

    One thing that is concerning however is that the v1 etching picture (see pic) that was provided a while back did etch very well too. Was this just a case of the prototype of the v1 etched perfectly, but the production parts did not due to the metallurgical issues? At any rate if the new stuff makes that etch repeatedly, and the metallurgical structure is sound, this should be a solid answer going forward.

    Rob
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  18. #93
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Chris@VargasTurboTech Click here to enlarge
    You're going to have to add something up there to stop the bolt from vibrating loose -we
    made the CBC as light as we could make it to minimize any added rotating weight to the motor and still have the strength characteristics needed.

    It really just adds a (large) degree of safety ensuring the crank bolt will not vibrate out. Remember the crank bolt is torqued 75 ft lbs plus 270* (for our hub installation), which is quite a bit of stretch on that thread pitch. The CBC doesn't see much torque; it would only see torque of crank bolt moving relative to assembly (should never happen). Again, it's a fastener retention device, not a torque transfer device. Part of the complete solution when used with the spline lock.

    As for the spline lock, check out the evidence of installation on the straight cut spline lock: Click here to enlarge

    Chris
    Thank you for the info I'll be ordering the CBC first! I'd appreciate your post but bimmerboost says I have to spread it around more.

    Thanks for the pictures of the crank that is very good! You should also put it on your website to dispell all the rumours that it doesn't work or make a mark on the crank. I'll be getting a splock but in the future.

  19. #94
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    Just another question, since the splock permanently marks the crank, what are the implacations of removing the splock and reinstalling it in the future if the head needs to be removed for example? Will the biting surface eventually fatigue and give way? Just asking because I wanted to get a splock first then later down the line send my head for porting, and since the crank in the m2 is forged it's alot more expensive to buy used or new vs. a standard n55.

  20. #95
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    38
    Rep Points
    157.3
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    2


    Yes Reputation No
    Good question. I'd imagine it would never fit 100% like the initial install, even if you lined it up as best as you could. Also I wasn't aware you had to remove the crank hub to change the head?

  21. #96
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Magnusk77 Click here to enlarge
    Good question. I'd imagine it would never fit 100% like the initial install, even if you lined it up as best as you could. Also I wasn't aware you had to remove the crank hub to change the head?
    You have to remove the timing chain and in order to remove the whole chain assembly instead of leaving it in the block you would have to remove the hub. Plus while it's out why not change the timing chain guides and tensioners.

  22. #97
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    700
    Rep Points
    1,815.4
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    19


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Magnusk77 Click here to enlarge
    Good question. I'd imagine it would never fit 100% like the initial install, even if you lined it up as best as you could. Also I wasn't aware you had to remove the crank hub to change the head?
    If for some reason you want the Splinelock removed, the V2 is easy to reinstall; you can really feel the spline clocking/location when putting it back in. Get it lined up, and torque it using the old bolt. Pull the bolt out, replace and then torque to stretch.

    Chris
    Chris - VTT Forum Representative
    Chris@Vargasturbo.com
    www.Vargasturbo.com
    Click here to enlarge

  23. #98
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Chris@VargasTurboTech Click here to enlarge
    If for some reason you want the Splinelock removed, the V2 is easy to reinstall; you can really feel the spline clocking/location when putting it back in. Get it lined up, and torque it using the old bolt. Pull the bolt out, replace and then torque to stretch.

    Chris
    Will doing this multiple times affect the biting surface of the crank? That's just my fear that if I do this a couple of time the material on the crank will weaken making the splock able to just break the surface and now being able to spin more.

  24. #99
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    700
    Rep Points
    1,815.4
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    19


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by F87Source Click here to enlarge
    Will doing this multiple times affect the biting surface of the crank? That's just my fear that if I do this a couple of time the material on the crank will weaken making the splock able to just break the surface and now being able to spin more.
    It's a very tight fit, you won't have any issues. A better question is why you'd be pulling off the hub like you're changing socks. Click here to enlarge

    Chris
    Chris - VTT Forum Representative
    Chris@Vargasturbo.com
    www.Vargasturbo.com
    Click here to enlarge

  25. #100
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    364
    Rep Points
    425.3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    5


    Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Chris@VargasTurboTech Click here to enlarge
    It's a very tight fit, you won't have any issues. A better question is why you'd be pulling off the hub like you're changing socks. Click here to enlarge

    Chris
    Track car life lol Click here to enlarge

    In a more realistic sense probably because I'll put the SPLOCK on first, then later on when I have a built motor, then likely another one or two time to change the timing chain, the guide and tensioners. Just gotta look a little bit ahead you know.

    Overall pretty pleased with your customer service and I'm glad to be a future customer, now if that stage 3 n55 turbo will be ready in the summer that would be a treat!

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •