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  1. #26
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
    ^ If it didn't know that was coffee I would think you were cooking meth.
    I feel like a Scientist 10/10 times

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
    What's the big deal about this? Or cold brewing I guess?

    I just throw ice cubes in my cup after my Nespresso is doing brewing it. Am I doing it wrong?
    the big deal isn't just cold brewing, but just the use of a french press itself and it isn't necessarily for all.. there is an acquired taste sort of threshold there. you will likely get some more grinds in your coffee and you'll notice significantly more oil on the brim. it is more flavorful as there are no filters and technically a more accurate method as the process requires you to heat up the water separately from the grinds. if you decide to try it out do yourself a favor and buy the whole bean and grind it up coarsely just before making it

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Daily Three Click here to enlarge
    the big deal isn't just cold brewing, but just the use of a french press itself and it isn't necessarily for all.. there is an acquired taste sort of threshold there. you will likely get some more grinds in your coffee and you'll notice significantly more oil on the brim. it is more flavorful as there are no filters and technically a more accurate method as the process requires you to heat up the water separately from the grinds. if you decide to try it out do yourself a favor and buy the whole bean and grind it up coarsely just before making it
    I've been wanting to buy an Aeropress. I heard they make a really good cup of coffee and it's easy to use/clean.

  4. #29
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    Yes....I have the Aeropress.

    It is a hybrid between a french press and a pressurized espresso device.

    Quite good, but only makes one cup at a time and is just as fussy about preparation as your siphoning technique.

    Since I am such a hardcore espresso enthusiast I keep it as a backup.

    My current ride is this one.....double boiler and variable brewing pressure.
    Using 9 Bar currently.....That's 132 psi for you turbo guys. Oh, and no meth - just straight caffeine. Click here to enlarge
    .
    .
    Click here to enlarge

  5. #30
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    I kind of want to be a dick in this thread but it's hard as I do like coffee.

  6. #31
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    This is kind of like the debate of forced induction versus normally aspirated engines.

    Drip or french press techniques brew coffee under normal atmospheric pressure whereas espresso machines use forced water pressure to extract more flavour.

    Don't get me started on the octane analogy for the beans.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DCAFS Click here to enlarge
    This is kind of like the debate of forced induction versus normally aspirated engines.
    In that case naturally aspirated wins as I assume taste is the prevailing factor.

  8. #33
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
    In that case naturally aspirated wins as I assume taste is the prevailing factor.
    Click here to enlarge

    Then why did you supercharge your M3?

  9. #34
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DCAFS Click here to enlarge
    Click here to enlarge

    Then why did you supercharge your M3?
    Not to make it a better driver's car but to make it faster.

  10. #35
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    I found Tony's coffee mug:

    Click here to enlarge

  11. #36
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
    Coffee is just made up of water anyway... but yeah, it does water it down.

    Ok, fine, educate me coffee enthusiasts.
    That's like comparing a Natty Light to a craft micro brewed IPA because "they're just made up of water anyway" haha

    You know how grapes create different flavors and notes in wine? Coffee beans are similar. There are countless different beans from many different countries that contain different subtle notes.

    Anyways, cold brew is my preferred coffee for the warmer months. Usually when you brew coffee with a french press, moka pot, siphon, pour over, keurig, nespresso, or mr. coffee you are using hot water to extract the coffee from the grounds.

    Cold brew uses room temperature/cold water (you can leave it out on the counter, but i store it in my refrigerator). So you grind up your beans, and pour you water over it and rely on time to extract the coffee as opposed to hot water. This changes the taste of the coffee (and usually gives you concentrated coffee which CAN be watered down with ice or water). Certain oils/fatty acids in coffee are soluble only at the higher temperatures you normally brew coffee at, some of which are bitter oils/fatty acids. So the cold brew process generally creates a smoother and less acidic cup of coffee that can be more flavorful.

    Now there are a lot of insane espresso machines and ways to brew coffee and they all do it very well. However, you can have a great cup of coffee for pretty cheap using the "pour over" method. Which is the process of slowly pouring coffee over the grounds in a filter in say a hario v60 (like $10-15). When I only have a few minutes to make a cup and want a quick clean up this is my go-to for making coffee. It's only one cup at a time which is a downer, but I have a 8 cup french press for when multiple cups are needed.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by chrisisnapping Click here to enlarge
    Certain oils/fatty acids in coffee are soluble only at the higher temperatures you normally brew coffee at, some of which are bitter oils/fatty acids.
    Yeah....that's the chemistry of making coffee. It's all about what you are dissolving into the water and higher temperature and higher pressures will extract different compounds. But it's a fine line when using 100+ psi to not extract the unpleasant tasting ones.

    Agree that the much simpler methods are more appealing.

    I tried cold-brew but did not take to it's flavour profile......but I hear that it dissolves a lot more caffeine than regular drip.

  13. #38
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by chrisisnapping Click here to enlarge
    That's like comparing a Natty Light to a craft micro brewed IPA because "they're just made up of water anyway" haha

    You know how grapes create different flavors and notes in wine? Coffee beans are similar. There are countless different beans from many different countries that contain different subtle notes.

    Anyways, cold brew is my preferred coffee for the warmer months. Usually when you brew coffee with a french press, moka pot, siphon, pour over, keurig, nespresso, or mr. coffee you are using hot water to extract the coffee from the grounds.

    Cold brew uses room temperature/cold water (you can leave it out on the counter, but i store it in my refrigerator). So you grind up your beans, and pour you water over it and rely on time to extract the coffee as opposed to hot water. This changes the taste of the coffee (and usually gives you concentrated coffee which CAN be watered down with ice or water). Certain oils/fatty acids in coffee are soluble only at the higher temperatures you normally brew coffee at, some of which are bitter oils/fatty acids. So the cold brew process generally creates a smoother and less acidic cup of coffee that can be more flavorful.

    Now there are a lot of insane espresso machines and ways to brew coffee and they all do it very well. However, you can have a great cup of coffee for pretty cheap using the "pour over" method. Which is the process of slowly pouring coffee over the grounds in a filter in say a hario v60 (like $10-15). When I only have a few minutes to make a cup and want a quick clean up this is my go-to for making coffee. It's only one cup at a time which is a downer, but I have a 8 cup french press for when multiple cups are needed.
    Ok, ok, I think I get it now. You explained it well.

    Now my question can I cold brew coffee quickly?

  14. #39
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
    Ok, ok, I think I get it now. You explained it well.

    Now my question can I cold brew coffee quickly?
    Unfortunately Cold Brew takes a while to make since the extraction process is different. That's why most people make it in large quantities so they can have it when they want.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Fishayyy Click here to enlarge
    Unfortunately Cold Brew takes a while to make since the extraction process is different. That's why most people make it in large quantities so they can have it when they want.
    I'm learning things!

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    yup the rule of thumb is at least 18-24 hours. I usually make a gallon pitcher's worth (comes out to around .5-.65 gallons once coffee grinds are removed) but again this is pretty concentrated. I have a 750ml bottle I bring to work, I fill up about 350ml with coffee, rest is unsweetened almond milk, ice cubes, and some water. So a batch lasts me at least a week.

    If you wanted to try it without the effort/wait starbucks has it and i'm sure your local non-chain coffee shop will have it as well.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by chrisisnapping Click here to enlarge
    yup the rule of thumb is at least 18-24 hours. I usually make a gallon pitcher's worth (comes out to around .5-.65 gallons once coffee grinds are removed) but again this is pretty concentrated. I have a 750ml bottle I bring to work, I fill up about 350ml with coffee, rest is unsweetened almond milk, ice cubes, and some water. So a batch lasts me at least a week.

    If you wanted to try it without the effort/wait starbucks has it and i'm sure your local non-chain coffee shop will have it as well.
    What do you use to brew a gallon of coffee in? I've never seen a gallon size french press.

  18. #43
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    a gallon pitcher, with a "brew bag" used in homebrewing to hold the coffee grinds.

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    3 out of 3 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No

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    Wish I could rep that but I need to spread the love lol

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Fishayyy Click here to enlarge
    Wish I could rep that but I need to spread the love lol
    Repped for you Click here to enlarge

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    I want to try this cold brew thing. Would someone please post the steps and what I need to buy? I like the idea of having a bunch of coffee in the fridge.

  23. #48
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky2 Click here to enlarge
    I want to try this cold brew thing. Would someone please post the steps and what I need to buy? I like the idea of having a bunch of coffee in the fridge.
    I'm too lazy to Google it but what is wrong with making coffee is old fashion way and just putting it in the fridge. That is what we did when I worked at a breakfast place. At night the old coffee get poured into containers and now it is sold as ice coffee.

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    need
    a french press
    whole beans - you can have the store grind them for you, but make sure they are coarsely ground.. best to grind just before using
    a grinder if you buy whole bean
    cold water
    fridge


    grind the beans
    throw them in the bottom of your french press
    add water and give it a quick stir
    put the press in the fridge (do not push the plunger down)
    let it sit for 24 hours
    push plunger down
    serve

    do not pull the plunger back up until you are done with the batch

    water bean ratio you can lookup and adjust to your preferences, honestly don't remember anymore.. i wanna say around 2-3 tablespoons of coffee for an american cup.. add a bit more water than you intend to use obviously

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