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    • What is the best BMW F80 M3 / F82 M4 S55 crank hub solution? Comparing Maximum PSI's multi-piece keyed crank hub to Gintani's single piece

      There are essentially two solid keyed crank hub kits on the market for the BMW S55 motor in the F80 M3 and F82 M4. As you know, the S55 3.0 I6 crank hub has the potential to spin and this problem plagued the platform for years.


      Gintani initially offered a design they later revised into their current one piece design pictured above.

      Maximum PSI also offers a keyed hub but it is not a single piece design:



      In order to get to what is pictured here you will have to place the two pieces together you see above:


      Ultimately both designs are trying to accomplish the same thing:

      The original flawed design allows the timing gear to spin independently from the crank, especially when the motor is modified. Best case scenario the motor needs to be re-timed with new components. Worst case, the valves contact the pistons requiring a complete overhaul. Common symptoms are rough running and camshaft angle deviation faults.
      To keep the timing gear in place the hub is keyed and the crank is drilled preventing movement.

      Maximum PSI claims they could build a single piece unit (this is more expensive and more technically demanding) but says that their design is easier to assemble. Easier often means cheaper.

      To Maximum PSI's credit their shop car has a prototype three piece design that is still holding up fine under extreme stress.

      The single piece design is more durable. Over time, it will not fatigue like a multi-piece design. When will it fatigue? Who knows, the Maximum PSI stretch bolt will eventually fail or come loose. The Gintani bolt clamping force is simply much, much higher.

      If the factory were to design it, it would be one piece. The Gintani bolt not being a stretch bolt is how the factory would do it as well.

      Will the Maximum PSI design work? Of course. The higher the horsepower application though and the higher the abuse the more durability will become a concern with a multi-piece hub.

      The decision is up to you.

      This article was originally published in forum thread: What is the best BMW F80 M3 / F82 M4 S55 crank hub solution? Comparing Maximum PSI's multi-piece keyed crank hub to Gintani's single piece started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 17 Comments
      1. trickcruiser's Avatar
        trickcruiser -
        Has anyone done a DIY on any of these options yet?
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by trickcruiser Click here to enlarge
        Has anyone done a DIY on any of these options yet?
        No. It's not super easy to DIY but if you have a lift in theory you could do it.

        With install it's about $3800.
      1. 5soko's Avatar
        5soko -
        These failures have become somewhat quiet on the forums..

        maybe the updated bedplate from the gts that bmw put in all their S55's and the updated hub gear, washer have helped fixed this?
        Def seem to be as widespread as normal common bmw failures like throttle actuators and rod bearings.
      1. trickcruiser's Avatar
        trickcruiser -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        No. It's not super easy to DIY but if you have a lift in theory you could do it.

        With install it's about $3800.
        I have a lift and fully functional garage so it’s not out of the possibility of doing this. Would love to have more details before tackling though.


        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 5soko Click here to enlarge
        These failures have become somewhat quiet on the forums..

        maybe the updated bedplate from the gts that bmw put in all their S55's and the updated hub gear, washer have helped fixed this?
        Def seem to be as widespread as normal common bmw failures like throttle actuators and rod bearings.
        Yeah, I am hopeful that my 18 ZCP is immune.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by trickcruiser Click here to enlarge
        I have a lift and fully functional garage so it’s not out of the possibility of doing this. Would love to have more details before tackling though.
        I don't know about Maximum PSI but Gintani has an install guide. You could talk to them. I'm sure you could do it.
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        I don't know about Maximum PSI but Gintani has an install guide. You could talk to them. I'm sure you could do it.
        I still have a couple of unanswered emails from 2016. lol
        Honestly between what has happening with your M3, the delays with Porsche and their absence on forums, i wouldn't work with these guys other than something like a tune which has no downtime. They seem to know what they are doing, but i'd rather to work with someone who's more communicative specially something like this which needs going back and fort with them on the phone if you are planning to do installation yourself.
      1. Sticky2's Avatar
        Sticky2 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        I still have a couple of unanswered emails from 2016. lol
        Honestly between what has happening with your M3, the delays with Porsche and their absence on forums, i wouldn't work with these guys other than something like a tune which has no downtime. They seem to know what they are doing, but i'd rather to work with someone who's more communicative specially something like this which needs going back and fort with them on the phone if you are planning to do installation yourself.
        I think their communication could use work as well.

        That said, my 911 is on its way back and I have data for stock turbos and upgraded turbos on various fuels nobody else has. Furthermore, no other tuner has shown more power especially on pump gas.

        Gintani isn't perfect but their stuff usually is the best. I just recommend being local.
      1. Eleventeen's Avatar
        Eleventeen -
        The bedplate design has no effect on crank hubs (and I haven’t seen anything published by BMW even suggesting this). I know a lot of people think it will help, but it won’t. The bedplate adds rigidity to the main bearing bores and the block overall, but it isn’t going to help the poor design of BMW’s multi-piece crank. The fact that it wasn’t keyed from the factory is ridiculous; very poor engineering.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Eleventeen Click here to enlarge
        The bedplate design has no effect on crank hubs (and I haven’t seen anything published by BMW even suggesting this). I know a lot of people think it will help, but it won’t. The bedplate adds rigidity to the main bearing bores and the block overall, but it isn’t going to help the poor design of BMW’s multi-piece crank. The fact that it wasn’t keyed from the factory is ridiculous; very poor engineering.
        This
      1. Sales@KRATOS's Avatar
        Sales@KRATOS -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by trickcruiser Click here to enlarge
        Has anyone done a DIY on any of these options yet?
        Both our KRATOS Turbo M3's spun the factory crank hubs above 700whp. One on the dyno the first day the turbos were installed (DCT) and the other on the street the first weekend the turbos were installed (Manual). We just received our crank hub kits from Maximum PSI and the build quality is top notch. Yes, it does utilize the factory crank bolt that it torque to yield. However, it no longer needs the friction washer since the the primary gear is part of the hub. According to our engineers, if anyone with big power is worried about the fact the Maximum PSI kit uses the factory bolt, they shouldn't be.

        As far as install is concerned, it should take a professional shop with the correct tools no more than 3-4 days to install the kit with the motor still in the car. We didn't do a DIY since we're a manufacturer and don't resell the crank hub kits. However, its's pretty straight forward.

        -You will first need the vanos timing tool kit. This will allow you to put the car on time before taking everything apart. This will require removal of the valve cover and the front access plate for the tensioner as well as pretty much all the accessories in front of the motor including the radiator fan.

        -Install the vanos timing kit and locking pin for the flywheel to set the timing. You will also need a tool to lock the crankshaft so you can loosen the main crank hub bolt. The pin lock for the flywheel is no where near strong enough to do this, so DO NOT attempt to remove/install the crank hub bolt without a tool. We fabricated a tool out of 1/4" steel to lock the crankshaft. If you think putting a pry bar in the flywheel ring gear will work, trust me, it doesn't. You might be able to get away with it when removing the bolt, but there is no way it should be done to tighten the bolt. FYI, it requires 100nm preload and 270 degrees of rotation to install the main bolt. DCT cars will require the tool to be purchased or made to do this procedure. However, theoretically manual cars could get away with putting the car in gear and loosening/tightening the bolt from the top. I wouldn't recommend this though as there isn't much room to do it this way and makes things a lot more difficult.

        -Mount an engine brace to the top of the motor so you can remove the engine mounts and subframe. FYI, the threaded hole where the tow hook goes on the top of the motor (Connects To Engine Brace) is smaller than the stock F80 M3 tow hook. So, you will need a tow hook from an E46 M3 since that's the one that fits.

        -Once the subframe is removed, you will need to remove the lower oil pan.

        -Lock the timing chain tensioner with a pin.

        -Remove stock crank hub and both gears.

        -Loosen and remove both camshaft sprocket bolts and cam sprockets.

        -Loosen and remove complete timing chain assembly and guides by sliding out of the top side of the cylinder head.

        -Install Maximum PSI Crank Hub fixture to crankshaft and drill holes for dowel pins. Only drill deep enough so that the the dowel pins don't bottom out. I would suggest having another person with a vacuum working with you to prevent metal debris from flying around.

        -Clean the area thoroughly and make sure no metal particles are left behind.

        -Now do everything listed in reverse order with the new Maximum PSI Crank Hub Kit. Just make sure you do not attempt to tighten the new crank hub bolt until the subframe and mounts are installed first.

        This is by no means a complete step by step DIY. It's a just a basic how-to so you can get a better idea as to what's involved in the process. Hope it helps!
      1. 5soko's Avatar
        5soko -
        Bmw will never publish a fix for a bad design, they never have..

        There has been so little confirmed failures on any cars post updated bedplate, updated friction washer for the crank, updated oil pump sprocket, updated oil pump, which run off the crank, updated timing chain
        it almost seems like something has fixed it..
        Maybe the crank not moving around, or the block, has helped keep the washer and crank together.

        I dont think there has been a confirmed case of failure for over a year on the forums. Either its fixed, or it really just rarely happens. ( 3 dealers and techs i asked have never heard of the failure. Open road in NJ, BMW of Brooklyn and BMW NYC)
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 5soko Click here to enlarge
        3 dealers and techs i asked have never heard of the failure. Open rod in NJ, BMW of Brooklyn and BMW NYC
        Then they must have their heads buried in the sand.
      1. 5soko's Avatar
        5soko -
        Maybe, but something is for certain, it for sure is not as widespread issue as older BMW common issues.

        We are just about 4 years in with the S55 engine, there isnt anything as common as Throttle actuator failures and rod bearing failures like the S65 and S85 ( or SMG issues). Nothing as common as N54 issues like fuel pump, injectors, misfires etc.
        The S55 is currently one of the most reliable M engine i have ever seen tbh. Then again it is an M engine that was based off a normal N55 engine, maybe that helped in reliability.
      1. Sales@Gintani.com's Avatar
        Sales@Gintani.com -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        I still have a couple of unanswered emails from 2016. lol
        Honestly between what has happening with your M3, the delays with Porsche and their absence on forums, i wouldn't work with these guys other than something like a tune which has no downtime. They seem to know what they are doing, but i'd rather to work with someone who's more communicative specially something like this which needs going back and fort with them on the phone if you are planning to do installation yourself.
        Apologies. We are a very small team and messages get lost over time. We try our best to get back to everyone as soon as possible but if you don't hear from us after a couple of days please just message us again and one of our guys will get on it.

        Here is a PDF to the install guide for everyone to check out so that you could see the installation process for our kit.

        https://drive.google.com/open?id=1DK...ErfND-u5zO3gXS

        Please email us or call us if anyone has any questions. We are only able to check the forums periodically.
      1. Sales@Gintani.com's Avatar
        Sales@Gintani.com -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 5soko Click here to enlarge
        Bmw will never publish a fix for a bad design, they never have..

        There has been so little confirmed failures on any cars post updated bedplate, updated friction washer for the crank, updated oil pump sprocket, updated oil pump, which run off the crank, updated timing chain
        it almost seems like something has fixed it..
        Maybe the crank not moving around, or the block, has helped keep the washer and crank together.

        I dont think there has been a confirmed case of failure for over a year on the forums. Either its fixed, or it really just rarely happens. ( 3 dealers and techs i asked have never heard of the failure. Open road in NJ, BMW of Brooklyn and BMW NYC)
        We've personally had over 10 cars come through the shop in the past year that have had crank hub failures and have sold more than 30 of our one piece crank hub kits.
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sales@Gintani.com Click here to enlarge
        Apologies. We are a very small team and messages get lost over time. We try our best to get back to everyone as soon as possible but if you don't hear from us after a couple of days please just message us again and one of our guys will get on it.

        Here is a PDF to the install guide for everyone to check out so that you could see the installation process for our kit.

        https://drive.google.com/open?id=1DK...ErfND-u5zO3gXS

        Please email us or call us if anyone has any questions. We are only able to check the forums periodically.
        Thank you for your honest response.
      1. bluesun's Avatar
        bluesun -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Then they must have their heads buried in the sand.
        My dealer does too -- talked to two techs and my SA a month or so ago. He'd never heard of any failures whatsoever, and looked at me like I was an idiot.