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  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 06:12 PM
    Gintani is seemingly tuning every Italian car in Southern California these days. The Lamborghini Urus will see quite a bit of tuning due to the 4.0 liter twin turbo V8 under the hood. There is quite a bit to gain and the motor is a powerhouse. These are Mustang dyno results so kindly keep that in mind. The baseline with a full exhaust and catless downpipes on 91 octane is 608 all wheel horsepower and 644 lb-t of torque to the wheels. After Gintani's custom dyno tune? 683 all wheel horsepower and 734 lb-ft of torque at all four wheels: It is not a high revver but more about torque down low as it should be in this heavy beast. Still, it makes nice power to 6500 rpm. With higher octane or methanol injection the car could likely clear 700 to all four wheels on the factory turbos on the conservative Mustang dyno. That is incredible. Wait until we see these things get turbocharger upgrades...
    0 replies | 9 view(s)
  • Coupes11's Avatar
    Today, 06:02 PM
    If there wasn't enough fuel going to the cylinders, wouldn't the lambda for each bank indicate that fact. The lambda appear to remain steady on 11-12.
    18 replies | 171 view(s)
  • Eleventeen's Avatar
    Today, 05:39 PM
    Ah, I see. Torque is 600 at 3500 RPM. Not sure why they use red on red, but I should have realized the torque line was on top. :facepalm I also though the title meant 682 WHP at 3500, but I guess he was referring to peak power. Double fail... That’s pretty ridiculous torque for a big single, so low in the RPM. Must pull like crazy.
    6 replies | 290 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 05:21 PM
    The Aston Martin DBS Superleggera is supposed to be Aston Martin's no nonsense high performance effort. With 715 horsepower from a twin turbo V12 as well as race tuned suspension and lightweight parts, it certainly is a valiant effort. That still does not change the fact this is a heavy and expensive luxury vehicle. Not to mention one with great looks and exclusivity exactly as an Aston Martin should be. The DBS Superleggera comes in at 4200 pounds yet it still manages an impressive laptime of 1:54.6. It does like quite a handful to hustle around the track though. The times below put the effort in context. Aston Martin did a commendable job with the car although it is not going to challenge any top sports cars. Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO: 01.48,00 min Lamborghini Huracan Evo: 01.49,00 min Porsche 911 Carrera S (992): 01.53,30 min Aston Martin DBS Superleggera: 01:54:60 min Audi R8 V10 Spyder Performance: 01.55,20 min Lamborghini Urus: 01.57,10 min Porsche 718 Boxster T (PDK) 01.58.80 min Audi TTRS Coupe: 01.58.80 min Toyota GR Supra: 01.58.80 min
    0 replies | 26 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    6 replies | 290 view(s)
  • DisCiteFullRetard's Avatar
    Today, 05:08 PM
    Cmon man, in units of HP and lb-ft torque is always going to being higher than HP until they cross at 5252 rpm. But to the point of the post, that curve looks pretty sweet. More info on the car associated with this dyno?
    6 replies | 290 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 04:51 PM
    A ton of great information below from BimmerBoost member @CobraMarty who is known for his MILV's (Modified Intake Lift Valvetronic supports). He recently got a hold of a B58 cylinder head for development and took photos as well as provided his impressions. Enjoy: Didn't sleep well so I got up early and took a pair of calipers to the B58 head that I have. Ports are BIG. B58 Intake is Oval shape- 35.7mm tall x 50mm wide. Not 'rectoval' like the N54/N55 at 29mm x 50mm. B58 Exhaust is also Oval- 29.2mm x 45.7mm wide. Not round like the N54/N55. B58 Valves measure- Intake 29.9-30.0mm, Exhaust 28.4mm. N52/N54/N55 Exhaust valves are all 28mm. N52 intake valves- 34.2mm, N54- 31.4mm, N55- 32mm. So just by 'looks', the B58 head is an improvement. Exhaust especially, Bigger ports and Bigger valves = more flow. Intake, maybe not so much, Bigger ports and smaller valves. IDK, but maybe that combination is better flowing than smaller ports and bigger valves. Or is there another reason or something else going on? The intake valves look to be moved out and right at the edge of the cylinder bore. It doesn't look like a bigger intake valve diameter would fit. Don't throw stones about the B58's 'smaller' intake valves just yet. Interesting is the different engines actual measurements. N52- 85mm bore x 88mm stroke = 2996cc and has the biggest intake valve 34.2mm. Cam is I-255*/E-263* durations. N54/55- 84mm bore x 89.6mm stroke = 2979cc and have 31.4mm and 32mm intake valves. Cams are N54- I-245*/E-261* and N55- I-255*/263* durations. B58- 82mm bore x 94.6mm stroke = 2998cc and has 30mm intake valves which looks to be the largest that would fit the 82mm bore. Cams to be determined. There is a correlation between cylinder bore diameter and intake valve size. Just some simple, basic engine generalities- Bigger bore (bigger intake valve) and shorter stroke make for a higher rev'ing engine. N52 engine. Smaller bore (smaller intake valve) and longer stroke makes for better intake filling and more torque and power across a broader rpm range. B58 engine. Head- very compact latest design, valvetronic eccentric cam and mechanism moved around, No exhaust cam clamshell like Nxx engines, Heavy, must be thicker in all the right places Supports for Intake Valvetronic- up high right on top, easy access, easy removal and replacement, hint MILVs? HPFP- mounts up high right on top, easy access, driven by 3 lobed on exhaust cam, easy to upgrade/replace, hint Xtreme DI Exhaust ports and close up exhaust port- big oval Intake ports and close up intake port- big oval Combustion Chamber and close up- very compact Valvetronic Eccentric cam Motor- externally mounted, up front, easy access, has hex screw to rotate manually Without a doubt, BMW did their homework. The B58 engine looks very promising!!
    12 replies | 87 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 04:47 PM
    Sticky replied to a thread B58: B58 MILVs !! in B38, B48, B58, S58
    A ton of great information below from BimmerBoost member CobraMarty who is known for his MILV's (Modified Intake Lift Valvetronic supports). He recently got a hold of a B58 cylinder head for development and took photos as well as provided his impressions. Enjoy: Didn't sleep well so I got up early and took a pair of calipers to the B58 head that I have. Ports are BIG. B58 Intake is Oval shape- 35.7mm tall x 50mm wide. Not 'rectoval' like the N54/N55 at 29mm x 50mm. B58 Exhaust is also Oval- 29.2mm x 45.7mm wide. Not round like the N54/N55. B58 Valves measure- Intake 29.9-30.0mm, Exhaust 28.4mm. N52/N54/N55 Exhaust valves are all 28mm. N52 intake valves- 34.2mm, N54- 31.4mm, N55- 32mm. So just by 'looks', the B58 head is an improvement. Exhaust especially, Bigger ports and Bigger valves = more flow. Intake, maybe not so much, Bigger ports and smaller valves. IDK, but maybe that combination is better flowing than smaller ports and bigger valves. Or is there another reason or something else going on? The intake valves look to be moved out and right at the edge of the cylinder bore. It doesn't look like a bigger intake valve diameter would fit. Don't throw stones about the B58's 'smaller' intake valves just yet. Interesting is the different engines actual measurements. N52- 85mm bore x 88mm stroke = 2996cc and has the biggest intake valve 34.2mm. Cam is I-255*/E-263* durations. N54/55- 84mm bore x 89.6mm stroke = 2979cc and have 31.4mm and 32mm intake valves. Cams are N54- I-245*/E-261* and N55- I-255*/263* durations. B58- 82mm bore x 94.6mm stroke = 2998cc and has 30mm intake valves which looks to be the largest that would fit the 82mm bore. Cams to be determined. There is a correlation between cylinder bore diameter and intake valve size. Just some simple, basic engine generalities- Bigger bore (bigger intake valve) and shorter stroke make for a higher rev'ing engine. N52 engine. Smaller bore (smaller intake valve) and longer stroke makes for better intake filling and more torque and power across a broader rpm range. B58 engine. Head- very compact latest design, valvetronic eccentric cam and mechanism moved around, No exhaust cam clamshell like Nxx engines, Heavy, must be thicker in all the right places Supports for Intake Valvetronic- up high right on top, easy access, easy removal and replacement, hint MILVs? HPFP- mounts up high right on top, easy access, driven by 3 lobed on exhaust cam, easy to upgrade/replace, hint Xtreme DI Exhaust ports and close up exhaust port- big oval Intake ports and close up intake port- big oval Combustion Chamber and close up- very compact Valvetronic Eccentric cam Motor- externally mounted, up front, easy access, has hex screw to rotate manually Without a doubt, BMW did their homework. The B58 engine looks very promising!!
    12 replies | 227 view(s)
  • Arin@APR's Avatar
    Today, 04:38 PM
    We’ve updated our Stage 1, Stage 2, and Stage 3 IS38 ECU Upgrades bringing new features, power, and safety. This is mostly available in our newly released 2019 GTI / A3 ECU Upgrades and is now available for all previous years in North America. Key Updates: – Better power delivery with flatter torque, and higher peak power – Various protection routines added and tweaked – Linear pedal mapping – Tire spin protection added (FWD files only, running an AWD file disables it) – Corrected the digital dash boost gauge – Auto Start / Stop is now inverted and defaults off (Stage 2/3) – Optional pops and bangs have 3 options: off, normal, and aggressive – Specific files were created for FWD and AWD drivetrains – Specific files were created for 6MT and DSG gearboxes – Low torque files added – Low octane (87 R+M/2) files added Tuning Details: Using a Kistler in-cylinder pressure transducer system, we greatly improved combustion efficiency and reduced in-cylinder combustion pressure while delivering the same output. Furthermore low-RPM torque is now limited in taller gears for greater LSPI protection. Essentially the engine experiences less strain but creates the same power. Using exhaust gas pressure transducers, thermocouples and turbine shaft speed sensors, we were able to more accurately adjust various speed and pressure models within the ECU, allowing us to reduce turbo shaft speed without sacrificing power. In doing so, boost control was greatly improved. We were able to enable and calibrate various turbo shaft speed protection routines within the ECU that were not enabled or calibrated on all ECU part numbers from the factory. Finally, turbo surge protection routines were recalibrated to prevent low rpm high load compressor surge in various conditions. Essentially boost control is improved, protection routines were added and the turbo doesn’t spin as fast or work as hard to create the same power. Pedal mapping was altered to provide a more linear feel. This gives the driver a more predictable pedal map. The map matches the OEM feel from 0-60% throttle and then increases linearly from 60-95% at peak torque. Furthermore first gear torque reductions were recalibrated in such a way as to not alter the pedal mapping sensitivity. Lastly, the valve-lift transition point is greatly improved during part-throttle operation for smoother operation. Vehicles equipped with the digital boost gauge will now see a more accurate gauge representation that shows vacuum all the way up to 3,000 mbar of absolute boost. The optional exhaust crackle feature has been improved based on customer feedback, and the stationary rev limited has been increased to 5,000 rpm for improved free-revving sound. Furthermore a louder and more aggressive option is available. Specific files for manual and DSG exist. Auto start/stop behavior is now inverted so the feature is turned off by default. Wheel spin is reduced on FWD vehicles with FWD specific software. AWD files are available that do not have this reduction and can be run on FWD vehicles if you so desire. Various other small tweaks related to support tickets and customer feedback was addressed to improve drivability and the driving experience. Lastly, 87 (R+M)/2 or 90 RON modes are now available. Power Figures: APR’s ECU Upgrades are available in multiple flavors, supporting various hardware modifications, fuel grades, torque levels, and options. Power levels are as follows: APR Plus ECU Upgrade: – 290 HP / 320 FT-LBS – 87 Octane APR Stage 1 ECU Upgrade (Low Torque): – 290 HP / 320 FT-LBS – 87 Octane – 323 HP / 326 FT-LBS – 91 Octane – 327 HP / 326 FT-LBS – 93 Octane – 337 HP / 327 FT-LBS – 104 Octane APR Stage 1 ECU Upgrade (High Torque): – 313 HP / 340 FT-LBS – 91 Octane – 321 HP / 351 FT-LBS – 93 Octane – 337 HP / 375 FT-LBS – 104 Octane APR Stage 2 ECU Upgrade (Low Torque) – 334 HP / 338 FT-LBS – 91 Octane – 337 HP / 339 FT-LBS – 93 Octane – 350 HP / 339 FT-LBS – 104 Octane APR Stage 2 ECU Upgrade (High Torque) – 333 HP / 364 FT-LBS – 91 Octane – 337 HP / 371 FT-LBS – 93 Octane – 351 HP / 392 FT-LBS – 104 Octane APR Stage 3 IS38 ECU Upgrade (Low Torque) – 395 HP / 334 FT-LBS – 91 Octane – 395 HP / 334 FT-LBS – 93 Octane – 396 HP / 340 FT-LBS – 104 Octane APR Stage 3 IS38 ECU Upgrade (High Torque) – 395 HP / 376 FT-LBS – 91 Octane – 396 HP / 385 FT-LBS – 93 Octane – 397 HP / 403 FT-LBS – 104 Octane For more information about each stage, compatible hardware, and other details, please visit our product page.
    2 replies | 94 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 04:23 PM
    The thing is they do it all in house. Also, like in the Urus example, they have the resources to deliver upgraded turbos first. For a high end car like that I'd definitely consider TTE over other options and as of right now there are no other options.
    8 replies | 379 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 04:21 PM
    Absolutely. Plus let's not forget their taxes. VAT inflates some of the pricing as does currency conversion.
    8 replies | 379 view(s)
  • KevinC39's Avatar
    6 replies | 290 view(s)
  • Eleventeen's Avatar
    Today, 03:29 PM
    Sticky Looks more like 600 WHP / 400 WTQ at 3500 RPM in the graph that was posted. Still very impressive, though.
    6 replies | 290 view(s)
  • richpike's Avatar
    Today, 01:48 PM
    Working for a large German technology company who designs and manufactures their products in Germany, I can tell you the typical R&D engineer is unbelievably focused on making the highest quality products with cost being a secondary concern. That makes it tough when competing with Chinese products where the lowest price is the primary focus, but for those people who value the best of the best, they’ll certainly be happy. It’s sort of refreshing to have a engineering first attitude vs a bean counter first attitude. -Rich
    8 replies | 379 view(s)
  • Payam@BMS's Avatar
    Today, 01:45 PM
    This is awesome, I like the rail idea for the methanol.
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • Payam@BMS's Avatar
    6 replies | 290 view(s)
  • quattr0's Avatar
    8 replies | 379 view(s)
  • maxnix's Avatar
    18 replies | 171 view(s)
  • blaster3500's Avatar
    Today, 11:26 AM
    Yeah I am very tempted but am going to wait on more results/longevity. I think I will stick with PI for now.
    27 replies | 1463 view(s)
  • Weehe's Avatar
    Today, 11:08 AM
    They provided detailed info on failure modes of HPFPs. This is the only post I have seen calling injectors into question.
    27 replies | 1463 view(s)
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