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  • Chris@VargasTurboTech's Avatar
    Today, 09:47 PM
    Hey guys, How about 10% off for Presidents Day? Input coupon code PRESIDENT for a cool 10% off. www.vargasturbo.com
    0 replies | 2 view(s)
  • Chris@VargasTurboTech's Avatar
    Today, 09:28 PM
    Hey guys, How about 10% off for Presidents Day? Input coupon code PRESIDENT for a cool 10% off. www.vargasturbo.com
    0 replies | 4 view(s)
  • richpike's Avatar
    Today, 05:34 PM
    Ooh - nice! -Rich
    1135 replies | 483221 view(s)
  • bmwsport's Avatar
    Today, 01:19 PM
    Here is a new video of his stock 720s vs a tuned GT500. Keep in mind he has a GT500 on order.
    16 replies | 237 view(s)
  • quattr0's Avatar
    Today, 12:51 PM
    Excellent!!!
    1135 replies | 483221 view(s)
  • richpike's Avatar
    Today, 12:24 PM
    Nice. Looking forward to seeing that. If I had used rib racks I could have probably put 10-12 racks on. That’s a huge amount of food. -Rich
    454 replies | 234058 view(s)
  • Sticky2's Avatar
    Today, 10:09 AM
    ^ I love this thread. 7 racks eh? I'm planning on doing three ducks and some lamb for the fight next week
    454 replies | 234058 view(s)
  • richpike's Avatar
    Today, 09:35 AM
    Loving this Gravity 560. For the Super Bowl I did 7 racks of ribs: I do the 3/2/1 method. Tried wrapping them with different liquids. A couple with beer. A couple with just BBQ sauce. And a couple with my normal apple juice. Had about a dozen people try them. All very good, but the Apple juice the clear winner. I’ll stick with the tried and true moving forward, but fun to experiment. Then the other night I reverse seared pork loins. WOW. Incredible. Smoked to 140 internal then cranked the G560 to 600 and reverse seared. Let rest for about 10 minutes. The sliced up. Amazing. I did one with just SPG and one with 2 Gringos Chupacabra Rub. I can’t recommend the Chupacabra Rub enough. Get some. You won’t regret it. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LWZN6GT/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_PtusEbVYZ63EB -Rich
    454 replies | 234058 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Today, 07:43 AM
    Hey Juse: :text-welcomewave:
    0 replies | 12 view(s)
  • Batman's Avatar
    12 replies | 1637 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 02:49 AM
    Just wanted to bump as I found it interesting most people just follow what they see others on the forum doing. Whether good or bad most people usually parrot what they read...
    11 replies | 842 view(s)
  • Sticky2's Avatar
    Today, 01:16 AM
    Welcome!
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Today, 01:04 AM
    Welcome mrciarlo, take a look around, I think you will like what you see.
    0 replies | 17 view(s)
  • cmyachtie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:24 PM
    Glad to be here........
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • nbrigdan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:53 PM
    I would much rather have the Alpina versions that are coming out, too bad they aren't available here (as far as I can tell we only get the B7). They look gorgeous, and are supposed to strike the balance between ride and handling much better. https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/motor-shows-tokyo-motor-show/new-alpina-b3-shown-saloon-form-tokyo The only downside is that I configured one and it was 63,000 GBP...before VAT.
    9 replies | 472 view(s)
  • Alpina_B3_Lux's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:36 PM
    I mentioned the X3M test a few weeks ago. Here is also the test of the M340i xDrive that echoes a lot of the things criticised in the X3M, notably bad steering and badly judged suspension components. Fast yes, but nothing else making the formerly driver-oriented cars one-dimensional acceleration vehicles. EVO 270 (January 2020): Text by Adam Towler BMW M340i xDrive It’s powerful, fast and has all the latest tech on board. So why can’t we get excited about BMW’s new M340i? by Adam Towler. Photography by Aston Parrott Time was when the appearance of a new, top-of-the-range BMW 3-series was A Really Big Deal. Something to look forward to. Whether 2.5-litre E30, 2.5- or 2.8-litre E36, 2.8- or 3-litre E46 or even, to a lesser extent, an E90 with that lovely, raspy, magnesium N52 six, a big-engined 3er was all crisp, confident and unmistakable lines, symphonic engine and entertaining rear-drive dynamics. If the M3 was a stretch too far for the wallet, then opting for the top of the regular range was hardly something to weep into the sauerkraut over, and it was never, ever, a car to be confused with a sturdy but much less flamboyant rival from the other side of the tracks in Stuttgart, or Ingolstadt. But in more recent years that intangible specialness has morphed into the faceless, monochromed world of the generic modern German sports saloon, with specs and layouts converging on a strikingly similar recipe, everything down to the window switches described as generating ‘ultimate driving pleasure’, and yet remarkably possessing drearily limited driver appeal. A 3-series has continued to be a well-engineered and technologically advanced car with, in some circles, what is perceived to be the right badge on the bonnet, but, as an evo reader, would you really dream of owning one? The new car market is full of nicely designed, refined, advanced, comfortable, reliable and well-built cars. But those attributes alone are no longer enough to denote something special. Maybe the G20 3-series is different. This one is orange for a start, and the figure of 369bhp most definitely catches the eye. It’s also four-wheel drive, and in the back of my mind I dimly recall reading of BMW insisting this generation of 3 was a return to a real driver’s car from Munich. Sadly, Sunburnt Orange on paper equates in reality to a dark, miserable orange on a winter’s day in the UK, which rapidly becomes essentially brown with the first hint of dirt attached to the fearsomely complex surfacing. I’m tempted to put the boot in again on BMW’s current styling direction, but it’s not my place to tell you what looks good or not, and I think Aston Parrott’s imagery says everything you need to know. This latest evolution of the B58 modular straight-six and its confusing TwinPower branding yet single-turbo installation produces exactly the same power as it does torque (369bhp and 369lb ft – up from 320bhp and 330lb ft in the old F30 340i). Given that peak torque arrives from just 1850rpm (and hangs around to 5000), it should make short work of the stout 1670kg kerb weight, and indeed the figures suggest exactly that, 62mph arriving from a standing start in just 4.4sec. Prod the starter button and the engine fires with all the richness and deep-timbred tonality you’d hope for from a straight-six, and immediately the mood inside the BMW turns more optimistic. Sure, it’s no looker, but maybe the other departments at BMW have got their mojo back? There’s no other way of saying this, but the answer to the above is emphatically ‘no’. Let’s start with the engine, which is certainly a high point. Obviously, turbocharging brings its own benefits and compromises. To say the 340i’s performance is strong is to woefully undersell its accelerative capability. Boost arrives early and hard, and from there the 340i simply bolts to the horizon. It would destroy a Mitsubishi Evo VIII or Impreza WRX STI PPP away from the lights, leave a B7 RS4 looking a bit silly and yes, would be just a whale tail behind a Porsche 996 Turbo on full launch. And this is a ‘warm’ 3-series saloon, for heaven’s sake. Actually, it is unnecessarily fast, which feels as weird to write as it probably is to read. But the fact it has so much raw performance really doesn’t add much, if anything, to the driving experience. Sure, it’s capable of big speeds in a very compressed period of time, but it’s so refined – credit where credit’s due – that there’s limited joy to be had from the process, an affliction contributed to by an eight-speed torque-converter auto being the only gearbox offering. The overall result is a need to keep a keen eye on the speedometer (of which we’ll talk more later) and an underlying feeling that the whole procedure has been a mix of futility and irresponsibleness. Still, this B58 would be hilarious in a Morgan Plus Six… Turbocharging the six in this way predictably means its voice as the revs rise is rather one-dimensional, and as for the claimed – and I quote – ‘particularly rich and thrilling’ M Sport exhaust system, that seems an exaggeration. Moreover, while there’s a certain addictiveness to the B58’s torque hit, its brusque delivery immediately puts the driver and chassis under pressure. This inevitably means that xDrive is essential, particularly in the broader mainstream market in which this car makes hay, because it would otherwise be a real handful in certain situations, much like an outgoing M3. This all adds the kilos, of course, not just the 4WD system but in all aspects of the car’s engineering, and there’s a very real sense that you could lose 25 per cent of the power, a chunk of the weight, and have a car that was 50 per cent more rewarding to drive… In truth, the xDrive set-up, with its electronically controlled multi-plate clutch, works well. It has the ability to make the 340i extremely sure-footed one moment, but then with the DSC system switched off will still allow the car to be driven on the throttle, aided by the M Sport rear diff. It needs care though, because the ferocity of the engine’s delivery and inevitable character of a force-fed throttle response mean you have to be right on your game if it does lose traction at the rear axle, and the way drive to the front tyres snaps the car back in line means that lock must then be removed smartish. It doesn’t help that the 340i’s steering is perhaps its worst feature, and another example of BMW lagging behind in the development of electrically assisted steering. The M Sport rim is awkwardly thick and squidgy, masking feedback that isn’t there anyway, but it’s the synthetic vagueness around the straight-ahead and forceful, artificial self-centring that really mar the overall picture. It’s such a poor representation of a connection between the driver and the front wheels. All of which makes the 340i a tricky car to garner genuine reward from. There’s little uniformity between the weights and actions of the primary controls, and with eight gears and small, unsatisfying paddles (the gear selector can also be used to change ratio but it feels a bit superfluous) it’s often best just to leave the capable Steptronic ’box to get on with it. How the ’box reacts, and indeed how the whole car behaves, is governed by the ubiquitous driving modes. There’s Eco Pro, Comfort, Sport, Sport+ and then Individual, plus Adaptive, where the car is supposed to know via GPS and other parameters what the set-up should be. But really the one thing you need to know, to cut through all this button-twiddling nonsense that even BMW’s own research has shown almost no owner ever actually does, is that in anything other than their Comfort setting the dampers are unpleasantly unyielding. The other settings don’t make the car better to drive, they just feel like an ill-judged attempt to present an overtly ‘sporty’ experience to those uninterested in such things anyway. Crucially, even in Comfort there’s an underlying abruptness to the rebound damping that makes what would otherwise be a devastatingly good mile-cruncher not as relaxing as it could be (our test car is on the optional 19-inch wheels with the Adaptive M suspension package). That’s a pity, because while the 340i’s very black interior is hardly inspiring, it’s nicely screwed together and, in the front half of the passenger compartment at least, spacious. But there’s less individuality to the interior design than there once was, and as for the all-digital instruments, it’s almost impossible now to get a reading on either speed or revs from the dials in your peripheral vision. Clear instrumentation was once a cornerstone of BMW interiors, but not here, and that’s not me being a luddite, it’s simply a matter of ergonomics and HMI (human-machine interfaces). It might be clever to have fancy graphics, but if as a driver you can’t see them as clearly or quickly, then there’s a problem. Why go in this direction? And that’s the point really. The M340i is massively fast, and bulging with tech, but It’s as if the driving part no longer really matters. It’s not a patch on an Alfa Giulia Veloce. Instead it’s a car that lacks confidence, a sense of identity and purpose, as if BMW has accepted that soon we might not be driving cars at all, merely passengering in them, and so has decided that’s the best element to relegate to the workshop floor. But for us it’s the part that matters most of all, and that’s why the M340i xDrive, setting aside the accepted conventions around the marque, is a very disappointing BMW.
    9 replies | 472 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:35 PM
    As they are UK based the spread into the US BMW market won't be as quick but man they're stuff is impressive. Pretty sure the Nissan GTR guys rate EcuTek highly.
    2 replies | 414 view(s)
  • maxnix's Avatar
    2 replies | 414 view(s)
  • maxnix's Avatar
    9 replies | 522 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:47 PM
    I never stop at red lights or stop signs and make sure I'm always going at least 40. Try me.
    12 replies | 1637 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:43 PM
    This is somewhat amusing to me as a I had an X3. The original. The ride back then? Awful. I mean awful. It handled surprisingly great and was fun to drive. Essentially an E46 330i on stilts. How is it when I drive a Macan S it's as comfortable as my 911 if not more so but the X3 still rides like crap in 2020?
    9 replies | 472 view(s)
  • AdminTeam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:09 PM
    Welcome to a real enthusiast forum Raffi007.
    0 replies | 19 view(s)
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