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    AC compressor removal?

    what belt should i use after removing the ac compressor from the n54 engine?

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No

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    I believe belts are specified in number of ribs and overall length. You could take a piece of string and route it such that it skips the A/C pulley, then measure it's length. For the ribs, just count them. I am not sure if different belts have different rib pitches, or if that is standard.

    This might be useful:

    http://www.autoparts-standard.org/in...J1459-2009.pdf
    Eppur si muove.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Tzu Click here to enlarge
    do u have DIY instructions on how to fit it

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    I believe belts are specified in number of ribs and overall length. You could take a piece of string and route it such that it skips the A/C pulley, then measure it's length. For the ribs, just count them. I am not sure if different belts have different rib pitches, or if that is standard.

    This might be useful:

    http://www.autoparts-standard.org/in...J1459-2009.pdf
    the pdf file super complicated Click here to enlarge

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 135idct Click here to enlarge
    the pdf file super complicated Click here to enlarge
    It's the SAE standard governing passenger car and light truck belts (PK profile/cross section). It basically says the belt is specified based on its effective length and number of ribs.

    For instance here:

    http://www.ecstuning.com/BMW-E90-335...lts/ES2581872/

    You can see the stock belt is a 7PK1855. This is a PK profile belt with 7 ribs and an effective length of 1855mm. It's the effective length that you need to determine to find your new belt size. The PK belts under 2000mm are specified in 10mm increments. You you need to be +/- 5mm accurate with your measurements.

    Just focus on sections 8 and 9. A lot of that document has to do with pulley profiles. You don't care about that.

    So to find the new effective length, use a piece of string or wire or something and route it the same way the new belt would be routed. The red line shows the difference in routing for the new belt.

    Click here to enlarge

    Keep in mind with the belt off, the tensioner is in a position which represents the maximum in travel. You are not going to be able to put much tension on it with just a piece of string. So when you do the measurement, you are going to need a belt a little smaller. You could try to measure the stock routing using the string method and compare that to the stock belt's effective length. The difference between these two measurements should be the same as the difference needed between the new routing measurement and the new belt.
    Eppur si muove.

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    So I forgot to ask, why are you removing the A/C compressor? Weight?
    Eppur si muove.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    So I forgot to ask, why are you removing the A/C compressor? Weight?
    the AC doesn't work i won't fix it will cost me a lot, ill remove it to save weight, i think less power loss with shorter belt

    if there's no one offers AC removing kit, i think ill keep

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    It's the SAE standard governing passenger car and light truck belts (PK profile/cross section). It basically says the belt is specified based on its effective length and number of ribs.

    For instance here:

    http://www.ecstuning.com/BMW-E90-335...lts/ES2581872/

    You can see the stock belt is a 7PK1855. This is a PK profile belt with 7 ribs and an effective length of 1855mm. It's the effective length that you need to determine to find your new belt size. The PK belts under 2000mm are specified in 10mm increments. You you need to be +/- 5mm accurate with your measurements.

    Just focus on sections 8 and 9. A lot of that document has to do with pulley profiles. You don't care about that.

    So to find the new effective length, use a piece of string or wire or something and route it the same way the new belt would be routed. The red line shows the difference in routing for the new belt.

    Click here to enlarge

    Keep in mind with the belt off, the tensioner is in a position which represents the maximum in travel. You are not going to be able to put much tension on it with just a piece of string. So when you do the measurement, you are going to need a belt a little smaller. You could try to measure the stock routing using the string method and compare that to the stock belt's effective length. The difference between these two measurements should be the same as the difference needed between the new routing measurement and the new belt.
    thanx to make it simple

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    Rather than use a string, if it were me I would put find/mark center and x/y targets on the deflection pully and the pulley betweeen the a/c compressor and the power steering pump with the belt on. Make sure the lines are level and cenetered. Mark the belt at the 180* point on both pulleys. Then measure between the two pulleys to determine the length of the section shown in red. Remove the belt. Subtract the distance between the two marks you put on the belt (will be the belt length to go from 180* point on pulleys around a/c comp and back) and add the distance (red) you measured on the car. This will allow for belt tension, the tensioner, etc.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Sure there are probably multiple ways to determine the length of the belt needed.

    You could also use a piece of masking tape and stick it on the belt as it loops around the "deflection pulley" and the idler pulley below it, following the path of the new belt. Put two marks on the old belt where the tape and the belt separate and measure between the marks to find the difference in length needed. In the picture above, the tape would go where the red line is. The marks would be made on the belt where the belt curls away from the tape to and from the A/C pulley.
    Eppur si muove.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by SCGT Click here to enlarge
    Rather than use a string, if it were me I would put find/mark center and x/y targets on the deflection pully and the pulley betweeen the a/c compressor and the power steering pump with the belt on. Make sure the lines are level and cenetered. Mark the belt at the 180* point on both pulleys. Then measure between the two pulleys to determine the length of the section shown in red. Remove the belt. Subtract the distance between the two marks you put on the belt (will be the belt length to go from 180* point on pulleys around a/c comp and back) and add the distance (red) you measured on the car. This will allow for belt tension, the tensioner, etc.
    another simple way, thanx

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    Sure there are probably multiple ways to determine the length of the belt needed.

    You could also use a piece of masking tape and stick it on the belt as it loops around the "deflection pulley" and the idler pulley below it, following the path of the new belt. Put two marks on the old belt where the tape and the belt separate and measure between the marks to find the difference in length needed. In the picture above, the tape would go where the red line is. The marks would be made on the belt where the belt curls away from the tape to and from the A/C pulley.
    maybe ill remove the power steering pump, what do u think?

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 135idct Click here to enlarge
    maybe ill remove the power steering pump, what do u think?
    Why would you do that?
    Eppur si muove.

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    5 out of 6 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    To workout the arms bruh

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    Why would you do that?
    ill transform it to race car, but im worrying about the belt length, it would be much shorter than the stock. where can i find it Click here to enlarge

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Tzu Click here to enlarge
    To workout the arms bruh
    It's been five minutes and I'm still laughing. I repped you in post 2 so I can't get you again.
    @135idct

    If you are making it into a legit race car then you can try it. Measure it up and see if you can find the belt. Goodyear has belts with 7 ribs down to 810mm effective length:

    http://www.goodyearep.com/ProductsDetail.aspx?id=3128

    You could also just walk into your local auto parts store. I bet they have a whole catalog of belts to order from. All you need to know is the length and number of ribs.

    I just didn't want to see you disable the power steering only to regret it later. Power steering is something you don't appreciate until it's gone. Trust me.
    Eppur si muove.

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    @135dct it's really not any harder than @ajm8127 is describing. Belts are cheap, and usually returnable if it doesn't fit, pending you don't gouge it up. Find a belt that fits first, then remove your desired accessories when you have a working belt.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Tzu Click here to enlarge
    @135dct it's really not any harder than @ajm8127 is describing. Belts and cheap, and usually returnable if it doesn't fit, pending you don't gouge it up. Find a belt that fits first, then remove your desired accessories when you have a working belt.
    the steering will be much stiffer when turning?

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    Absolutely. Find a decline road and run the car in accesory mode with the engine off; shift to manual and let the car roll while steering. That's what it'll feel like. I have, and wouldn't again, do that for a daily driver.

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Tzu Click here to enlarge
    Absolutely. Find a decline road and run the car in accesory mode with the engine off; shift to manual and let the car roll while steering. That's what it'll feel like. I have, and wouldn't again, do that for a daily driver.
    after watching this, changed my mind Click here to enlarge
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLltXRRz9Zo

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 135idct Click here to enlarge
    after watching this, changed my mind Click here to enlarge
    [video]www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLltXRRz9Zo[/url]
    Good call.
    Eppur si muove.

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    I have a spare OEM A/C compressor I bought on ebay a while ago i'll let go for $280 if you want or need it
    Click here to enlarge < Click picture for photoshoot
    E90 335i xDrive 6spd, Nav, Prem, Cold Weather, & Sports package - Msport Conversion
    More Pictures: Build Thread /// Shop I use: Aci Dynamix 408AWHP/ 483AWTQ Uncorrected Mustang Dyno

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    This is a BMW not a clapped out 5.0 mustang, the whole point of this cars is to have a 11 second car with the ac on and the windows up in comfort. Why are you even thinking of doing this? I don't really get it. the gains you get from removing the AC compressor are going to be so minimal. Just turn the AC off when you are about to race. What you want to try to shave another 10lbs? I think you may be on the wrong platform. These cars are not light.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 135idct Click here to enlarge
    the AC doesn't work i won't fix it will cost me a lot, ill remove it to save weight, i think less power loss with shorter belt

    if there's no one offers AC removing kit, i think ill keep
    you could get an ebay compressor for $200-$250... then it's about $100-$200 in labour to replace

    much easier imo lol
    boop

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