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  1. #1
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    Most Accurate E85 Tester

    What's a more accurate E85 tester than Quick Fuel's E85 Tester?

    Quick Fuel's E85 Tester has worked for me the handful of time's I've used it. With that said, I might just be crazy with something I noticed recently.

    I filled up with E85 a few weeks ago, and it was E80 per the tester and after about 20 minutes of waiting. While cleaning out my garage over the weekend, I found the test tube in a box that I forgot about. I looked at the percentage and it was now around E73.

    I found the tube on it's side, so could it just be a case of some of it spilling? Could it be that I didn't screw on the cap tight enough and x evaporated? Either way, I'm curious if anyone else is using another E85 tester.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by RoyalFlush Click here to enlarge
    What's a more accurate E85 tester than Quick Fuel's E85 Tester?

    Quick Fuel's E85 Tester has worked for me the handful of time's I've used it. With that said, I might just be crazy with something I noticed recently.

    I filled up with E85 a few weeks ago, and it was E80 per the tester and after about 20 minutes of waiting. While cleaning out my garage over the weekend, I found the test tube in a box that I forgot about. I looked at the percentage and it was now around E73.

    I found the tube on it's side, so could it just be a case of some of it spilling? Could it be that I didn't screw on the cap tight enough and x evaporated? Either way, I'm curious if anyone else is using another E85 tester.
    Ethanol is highly hygroscopic, meaning it will absorb water rapidly if it is not stored correctly. Most likely the ethanol just absorbed water and reduced the ethanol blend by dilution. Was the test tube sealed in any way?
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    Ethanol is highly hygroscopic, meaning it will absorb water rapidly if it is not stored correctly. Most likely the ethanol just absorbed water and reduced the ethanol blend by dilution. Was the test tube sealed in any way?
    It was just sealed by the cap it comes with. I'm unsure how tight it is, and unsure if I even capped it as tight as possible since I already had tested E85 by then. It was also just on a shelf in the garage for about 2-3 weeks. I don't know if weather plays a factor, but I'm in Northern VA.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by RoyalFlush Click here to enlarge
    It was just sealed by the cap it comes with. I'm unsure how tight it is, and unsure if I even capped it as tight as possible since I already had tested E85 by then. It was also just on a shelf in the garage for about 2-3 weeks. I don't know if weather plays a factor, but I'm in Northern VA.
    Temperature and humidity does play a factor. The quick fuel tester is just a "user friendly" version of the proper way to measure for ethanol content. Accuracy of the quick fuel tester is dependant upon accurate use and lack of contamination, here is the "official" way to do it without the user friendly quick fuel tester. http://www.ehow.com/how_2143193_test...l-content.html.
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    Put in a Zeitronix gauge or get a P3 gauge and wire up an E85 sensor to it

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    I have one of these sititng in my garage if anyone wants it. Shoot me an offer.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    Temperature and humidity does play a factor. The quick fuel tester is just a "user friendly" version of the proper way to measure for ethanol content. Accuracy of the quick fuel tester is dependant upon accurate use and lack of contamination, here is the "official" way to do it without the user friendly quick fuel tester. http://www.ehow.com/how_2143193_test...l-content.html.
    I bought a new graduated cylinder for this....

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by dzenno@PTF Click here to enlarge
    Put in a Zeitronix gauge or get a P3 gauge and wire up an E85 sensor to it
    ....then I snap-bought this (ECA Kit). What's the estimated install time and cost?

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    I think the install would be pretty quick. Just drop the sensor in the fuel line and run the wiring to a gauge somewhere in the cabin.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by RoyalFlush Click here to enlarge
    I bought a new graduated cylinder for this....



    ....then I snap-bought this (ECA Kit). What's the estimated install time and cost?
    Make sure you purchase the correct ECA package, harness, and source the correct flex fuel sensor. The zeitronix "flow through" sensor does not support the high pressure our "low pressure" fuel systems run. You need the pigtail and harness for GM sensor 12568450 or 12570260, and of course the actual sensor itself.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    Make sure you purchase the correct ECA package, harness, and source the correct flex fuel sensor. The zeitronix "flow through" sensor does not support the high pressure our "low pressure" fuel systems run. You need the pigtail and harness for GM sensor 12568450 or 12570260, and of course the actual sensor itself.
    Where does it say on the website what pressure their sensor can support? The only sensor specs they seem to list are for the GM one.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    Make sure you purchase the correct ECA package, harness, and source the correct flex fuel sensor. The zeitronix "flow through" sensor does not support the high pressure our "low pressure" fuel systems run. You need the pigtail and harness for GM sensor 12568450 or 12570260, and of course the actual sensor itself.
    So you mean this sensor is not specified up to a high enough pressure for our low pressure systems?

    http://www.usa.vdo.com/generator/www..._CO1483_C.html
    Eppur si muove.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    So you mean this sensor is not specified up to a high enough pressure for our low pressure systems?

    http://www.usa.vdo.com/generator/www..._CO1483_C.html
    @JC335xi, I don't see the specifications listed anymore, but about a year ago i was planning on going with this setup and IIRC, the VDO sensor was only accurate up to ~ 50 psi. The GM sensor is good to 145psi.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    Ethanol is highly hygroscopic, meaning it will absorb water rapidly if it is not stored correctly. Most likely the ethanol just absorbed water and reduced the ethanol blend by dilution. Was the test tube sealed in any way?
    If the Ethanol content is already separated from the gasoline wouldn't any additional water content just add to the Ethanol/Water portion and in the end show a higher concentration of Ethanol in the mix?
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by brusk Click here to enlarge
    If the Ethanol content is already separated from the gasoline wouldn't any additional water content just add to the Ethanol/Water portion and in the end show a higher concentration of Ethanol in the mix?
    Possibly. They also give you specific instructions on how to perform the test including the time to wait between adding the water, shaking the mixture, and letting it settle. Maybe the water and ethanol has mixed back together with the gasoline, who knows.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    @JC335xi, I don't see the specifications listed anymore, but about a year ago i was planning on going with this setup and IIRC, the VDO sensor was only accurate up to ~ 50 psi. The GM sensor is good to 145psi.
    From what I am reading, Seimens made the original aluminum brick ethanol sensor, probably when they still owned VDO. Ford and GM both used this sensor. Then Continental bought VDO and now the newest generation of sensors are the ones I've posted a link to above.

    I've tried to locate specifications for any of the following GM part numbers (which are Continental/VDO parts) to no avail:

    13577379
    13577429
    13577394

    I don't think the pressure will affect the accuracy. The sensors measure the capacitance of the fuel to judge it's ethanol content:

    http://www.cvel.clemson.edu/auto/sen...el-sensor.html

    The capacitance is dependent on the permittivity of the fuel, and the length and radius of the two electrodes. Pressure does not figure into the picture at all.

    What the fuel pressure will do is potentially rupture a sensor not designed for it.

    The most relevant piece of info I found is the 13577379 sensor is used in the Cadillac SRX which is equipped with GM's high feature LY7 3.6L V6 engine. This engine runs at a rail pressure of 60 psi.

    http://hfv6.org/showthread.php?t=349...full=1#post587

    The N54 low pressure is less than 80. So that's less than a 20psi difference. I doubt the sensor will burst at the slightly higher pressure. It's probably designed to fail at two or three times the rail pressure on the LY7.

    This is great because the 13577379 sensor is 80 bucks. I plan on buying one of these and designing some electronics to be able to read the sensor. It should be significantly cheaper than the Zeitronix product (like around half for the sensor, cabling and electronics), especially considering they are charging $200 for a 80 dollar sensor with a sticker on it.
    Eppur si muove.

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    @ajm8127, drr, not sure why i said only accurate to, i meant to say "only rated up to." Honestly with the plethora of the GM 12568450 or 12570260 sensors around, if i was going to go through with it i would just snatch one up from a junkyard. There is also a few on ebay for $150 bucks.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    @ajm8127, drr, not sure why i said only accurate to, i meant to say "only rated up to." Honestly with the plethora of the GM 12568450 or 12570260 sensors around, if i was going to go through with it i would just snatch one up from a junkyard. There is also a few on ebay for $150 bucks.
    No worries.

    If you can score one at a junkyard that is great. Personally I prefer to buy one new and i think the newer VDO sensors will work fine. I guess we will see.

    There is a flexible line between the fuel lines on the bottom of the car and the HPFP inlet. I was going to try and mount the sensor there. It almost looks like the stock fittings are the same type as the ethanol sensors. Not sure about size but I think Jegs and Summit both sell fittings which will work.

    Once the actual ethanol content of the fuel in the tank is known, it should be pretty easy to add the correct concentration of E85 at the pump.
    Eppur si muove.

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    Alright, so, I read through the feedback, and I really appreciate it. I'm one that doesn't care too much about paying a little bit more if it comes with everything needed. I believe they offer different ECA kits with different sensors, and the one(s) you all advised are available.

    With their new ECA-2 Kit, I'm thinking about mounting the gauge in the ashtray pod, along with my HFS-4 gauge.

    Am I correct in that the installation is basically connecting it to the return fuel line, and that's all? This would be somewhere under the car or in the engine bay?

    My friend and I installed the inline Walbro 255 LPFP, and I was thinking about maybe tackling this ourselves again. (Doable?)

    Edit: We don't have a return line?

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    I'd just message them about the LPFP pressure on our cars and ask them to recommend what would be compatible so you're covered if something doesn't work out.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by dzenno@PTF Click here to enlarge
    I'd just message them about the LPFP pressure on our cars and ask them to recommend what would be compatible so you're covered if something doesn't work out.
    Sounds like a plan

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by RoyalFlush Click here to enlarge
    Alright, so, I read through the feedback, and I really appreciate it. I'm one that doesn't care too much about paying a little bit more if it comes with everything needed. I believe they offer different ECA kits with different sensors, and the one(s) you all advised are available.

    With their new ECA-2 Kit, I'm thinking about mounting the gauge in the ashtray pod, along with my HFS-4 gauge.

    Am I correct in that the installation is basically connecting it to the return fuel line, and that's all? This would be somewhere under the car or in the engine bay?

    My friend and I installed the inline Walbro 255 LPFP, and I was thinking about maybe tackling this ourselves again. (Doable?)

    Edit: We don't have a return line?
    Correct, no return line. Maybe try contacting Vishnu and see if they will sell you just the lines for the fuel sensor (part of their E85 flex fuel kit). It uses the GM sensor listed above and mounts easily in the engine bay between the hard underbody line and the flexible line going to the HPFP inlet and uses factory style 5/16th quick connect fittings. If not you will need to source your own.
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