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  1. #1
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    Thumbs up 135i -> Racing Brake Stock Caliper Piston Upgrades

    If you track your car, then do this! No driving impressions yet, but you'll see from the pictures just how bad my stock pistons were. I let them get way beyond what they should, mostly due to laziness and I was getting away with it. But last time out, I ruined a set of pads from uneven wear, due to the deterioration of the pistons.


    Took about 6 hours with pad replacement.


    Links to what I purchased:


    FRONT KIT
    REAR KIT


    Process:


    No information on how to uninstall/install brake lines and calipers, there's plenty of that if you search around.


    1) Get car up on jack-stands (all four wheels at the same time preferred).
    2) remove brake line from caliper
    3) remove caliper from hub
    4) remove pads from caliper
    5) use compressed air (90 psi) or so through the same whole brake line plugs into. This ejects the pistons. I used carpenter clamps to hold the other pistons in place while ejecting one at a time and replacing. Otherwise only the closest piston to the air will eject.
    6) remove dust seal/boot
    7) remove pressure/oil seal
    8) install new pressure/oil seal
    9) place new dust boot/seal onto new piston neck (there's a slot that it falls into)
    10) Install new piston with dust boot at the same time, and make sure boot falls into caliper slot.
    11) repeat steps 5-10 for each piston (best to do one at a time)
    12) install pads
    13) install caliper to hub
    14) install brake line
    15) re-fill/bleed brake fluid system
    16) blah blah, you get it.


    Car still on jackstands, because almost through the process I forgot that I ran out of brake fluid.. [dumb move]


    Packaging


    Nothing fancy, but well put together and prepped. Each set of pistons and seals had their own sub-compartment within the bag.


    overall packaging
    Click here to enlarge


    Seals and Boots
    Click here to enlarge


    Pistons
    Click here to enlarge


    Install


    This is what the front caliper looks like with beat up stock pistons


    Picture 1
    Click here to enlarge
    Picture 2
    Click here to enlarge


    Side by side comparison of new stainless-steel piston and stock one. No idea how I was breaking like this, all of them were this bad or worse.


    Click here to enlarge


    Compressed air through pictured slot to eject pistons. Make sure to put about 1" to 1 1/2" inches of cardboard infront of the piston you're ejecting, it comes out rather quickly and with force.


    Click here to enlarge


    Removing the dust boot, use any thin flat-head screwdriver, or something to fit in and pull up.


    Click here to enlarge


    To remove the pressure seal, use the same tool and essentially place it behind the seal, and pull out. Once there's enough of the seal out of the slot, remove with fingers ore pliers.


    Install the new seal into the same slot, kinda of a pain, tedious, not hard.


    Click here to enlarge


    Here's the new piston with the dust-boot/seal attached, this goes into the caliper together. Then, the boot fits into the same slot as the one removed earlier.


    Click here to enlarge


    Once done, it should look something like this.


    Click here to enlarge
    Click here to enlarge


    ---------


    Here's what the six pistons from the driver side front caliper looked like.


    Click here to enlarge


    No pictures from the rear, they weren't nearly as bad, but still should be done. The process is the same, just less work, only one piston on each side of the caliper, bigger piston, whole and easier to work with.


    ---------


    If you decide to do this, do at your own risk.
    || DCT | ESS Tune | ACM Test-pipes | AA Green Filter | Swift Spec-R Springs | Stoptech ST-40 F || || My Youtube Channel|| My Vimeo Channel ||

  2. #2
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    reserved for on-street impressions
    || DCT | ESS Tune | ACM Test-pipes | AA Green Filter | Swift Spec-R Springs | Stoptech ST-40 F || || My Youtube Channel|| My Vimeo Channel ||

  3. #3
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    reserved for on-track impressions
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  4. #4
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    How many track days have you done before the point you wanted to change those out?
    PTF PROTuned | RB's | AMS FMIC | AR DP's | HPF Exhaust | CP-E DCI | Apex Arc 8's | 235/275 Star Specs |

    Click here to enlarge


  5. #5
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    they say its probably a good idea even just after hard street use for a few years. easiest way to tell is pull one of the fronts and see if they look like toast yet. just a matter of time really.

  6. #6
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Black Sheep Click here to enlarge
    How many track days have you done before the point you wanted to change those out?
    I have between 18-20 track days on them, but in all honestly even with shims, they should've been done after the 5th track day. That's only because I had no experience, if I was on the same car, same brakes, they'll be done on the first or second day, braking how I do now.

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by seth Click here to enlarge
    they say its probably a good idea even just after hard street use for a few years. easiest way to tell is pull one of the fronts and see if they look like toast yet. just a matter of time really.
    If you drive "hard/aggressive" at all, they really should be done sooner than later.
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    I did mine a few weeks back.
    Also got the Racing Brake BBK rotors, and replaced them at the same time
    Your dust seals look even worse then mine Click here to enlarge
    Getting the dust seals removed can be tricky. They don't come out easily.
    Be very carefull with the removal of the pressure rings. You really don't want to scratch the piston housing...

    This is also a great time to change your brake fluid to some more heat capable brake fluid.
    I switched to Motul 600, but there are other braking fluids out there.

    For those interrested, Racing Brake is having a group sell including the 2-piece floating rotors, with a 20% discount on all parts.
    There are two theories to arguing with women. Neither one works

  8. #8
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DavidV Click here to enlarge
    I did mine a few weeks back.
    Also got the Racing Brake BBK rotors, and replaced them at the same time
    Your dust seals look even worse then mine Click here to enlarge
    Getting the dust seals removed can be tricky. They don't come out easily.
    Be very carefull with the removal of the pressure rings. You really don't want to scratch the piston housing...

    This is also a great time to change your brake fluid to some more heat capable brake fluid.
    I switched to Motul 600, but there are other braking fluids out there.

    For those interrested, Racing Brake is having a group sell including the 2-piece floating rotors, with a 20% discount on all parts.
    Good info and thoughts. Those rotors are in my near future, but one step at time. Have added allot of stuff in the last 1-2 months.. budget is getting tight. Click here to enlarge

    Thanks
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  9. #9
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DavidV Click here to enlarge
    I did mine a few weeks back.
    Also got the Racing Brake BBK rotors, and replaced them at the same time
    Your dust seals look even worse then mine Click here to enlarge
    Getting the dust seals removed can be tricky. They don't come out easily.
    Be very carefull with the removal of the pressure rings. You really don't want to scratch the piston housing...


    This is also a great time to change your brake fluid to some more heat capable brake fluid.
    I switched to Motul 600, but there are other braking fluids out there.

    For those interrested, Racing Brake is having a group sell including the 2-piece floating rotors, with a 20% discount on all parts.
    How much we looking at?
    PTF PROTuned | RB's | AMS FMIC | AR DP's | HPF Exhaust | CP-E DCI | Apex Arc 8's | 235/275 Star Specs |

    Click here to enlarge


  10. #10
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Black Sheep Click here to enlarge
    How much we looking at?
    Caliper rebuild kit complete pistons and seals $475
    Front disks OEM replacement 2-piece floating rotors $710
    Option:Oversized version of same disks $1215
    In progress if enough animo: matching rear rotors 2-piece $700 (need 7 more people for this)
    If ordered thrue group buy (now offering at RB site) -20% discount on all parts.

    Easily the cheapest high quality big brake upgrade you will find anywhere.
    Their quality is top knotch. These pistons fit to the .01mm. Really high standard.

    Click here to enlarge
    There are two theories to arguing with women. Neither one works

  11. #11
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    Thanks David, at this time I do not think I need the rebuild kit, but will be in the market for some nice rotors soon. What makes these better than say bmw performance, ecs 2 piece rotors, and everything else out there?
    PTF PROTuned | RB's | AMS FMIC | AR DP's | HPF Exhaust | CP-E DCI | Apex Arc 8's | 235/275 Star Specs |

    Click here to enlarge


  12. #12
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Black Sheep Click here to enlarge
    Thanks David, at this time I do not think I need the rebuild kit, but will be in the market for some nice rotors soon. What makes these better than say bmw performance, ecs 2 piece rotors, and everything else out there?
    I'm replacing my BMW Performance rotors by these. They really didn't add a lot if you really track your car. It's mostly a cosmetic upgrade. Still as heavy as normal OEMs, still run hot.
    RBs will solve the heating problems.
    The RB disks are a lot lighter as well. A OEM size RB rotor is about 5lbs per corner lighter.
    Even the oversized rotor is almost 1.5lbs lighter than OEM.
    There are two theories to arguing with women. Neither one works

  13. #13
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    Thanks, I'll keep these in mind.
    PTF PROTuned | RB's | AMS FMIC | AR DP's | HPF Exhaust | CP-E DCI | Apex Arc 8's | 235/275 Star Specs |

    Click here to enlarge


  14. #14
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    Ryan I have a guy for aftermarket rotors (and the piston upgrade if you want that also) if you want the info. He might even be a member here.

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    Click here to enlarge I'll let you know once I get my first project done Thanks
    PTF PROTuned | RB's | AMS FMIC | AR DP's | HPF Exhaust | CP-E DCI | Apex Arc 8's | 235/275 Star Specs |

    Click here to enlarge


  16. #16
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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    I forgot that you can't edit posts after 10 minutes on this site (still find that stupid). So my reserved posts up top are useless. anyways....


    -------------


    finally got my RBF 660 in and the mid stainless-steel lines. I had done the others, but never the "mids", now I know why. What a pain in the ass those things are in this car, but got them done anyways.


    Just bedded my new RP2 Carbotech pads, didn't crash, car stops fine, so I think it's good for now.. lol

    I'll post up more, as I drive around.
    Last edited by yandyr; 04-05-2013 at 09:36 PM.
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  17. #17
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    I had my lines replaced by the local BMW dealer.
    They were complaining they had to make/modify a tool to get them in Click here to enlarge
    But if you're gonna replace them, best to replace them all.
    There are two theories to arguing with women. Neither one works

  18. #18
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    Reputation: Yes | No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by yandyr Click here to enlarge
    If you track your car, then do this! No driving impressions yet, but you'll see from the pictures just how bad my stock pistons were. I let them get way beyond what they should, mostly due to laziness and I was getting away with it. But last time out, I ruined a set of pads from uneven wear, due to the deterioration of the pistons.


    Took about 6 hours with pad replacement.


    Links to what I purchased:


    FRONT KIT
    REAR KIT


    Process:


    No information on how to uninstall/install brake lines and calipers, there's plenty of that if you search around.


    1) Get car up on jack-stands (all four wheels at the same time preferred).
    2) remove brake line from caliper
    3) remove caliper from hub
    4) remove pads from caliper
    5) use compressed air (90 psi) or so through the same whole brake line plugs into. This ejects the pistons. I used carpenter clamps to hold the other pistons in place while ejecting one at a time and replacing. Otherwise only the closest piston to the air will eject.
    6) remove dust seal/boot
    7) remove pressure/oil seal
    8) install new pressure/oil seal
    9) place new dust boot/seal onto new piston neck (there's a slot that it falls into)
    10) Install new piston with dust boot at the same time, and make sure boot falls into caliper slot.
    11) repeat steps 5-10 for each piston (best to do one at a time)
    12) install pads
    13) install caliper to hub
    14) install brake line
    15) re-fill/bleed brake fluid system
    16) blah blah, you get it.


    Car still on jackstands, because almost through the process I forgot that I ran out of brake fluid.. [dumb move]


    Packaging


    Nothing fancy, but well put together and prepped. Each set of pistons and seals had their own sub-compartment within the bag.


    overall packaging
    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...281fb7_c-1.jpg


    Seals and Boots
    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...4e1fa1_c-1.jpg


    Pistons
    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...121244_c-1.jpg


    Install


    This is what the front caliper looks like with beat up stock pistons


    Picture 1
    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...66f5a4_c-1.jpg
    Picture 2
    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...b64212_c-1.jpg


    Side by side comparison of new stainless-steel piston and stock one. No idea how I was breaking like this, all of them were this bad or worse.


    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...03041a_c-1.jpg


    Compressed air through pictured slot to eject pistons. Make sure to put about 1" to 1 1/2" inches of cardboard infront of the piston you're ejecting, it comes out rather quickly and with force.


    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...287f59_c-1.jpg


    Removing the dust boot, use any thin flat-head screwdriver, or something to fit in and pull up.


    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...e57ab1_c-1.jpg


    To remove the pressure seal, use the same tool and essentially place it behind the seal, and pull out. Once there's enough of the seal out of the slot, remove with fingers ore pliers.


    Install the new seal into the same slot, kinda of a pain, tedious, not hard.


    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...f06435_c-1.jpg


    Here's the new piston with the dust-boot/seal attached, this goes into the caliper together. Then, the boot fits into the same slot as the one removed earlier.


    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...2509d7_c-1.jpg


    Once done, it should look something like this.


    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...4965f8_c-1.jpg
    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...d3f1cd_c-1.jpg


    ---------


    Here's what the six pistons from the driver side front caliper looked like.


    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...cc1721_c-1.jpg


    No pictures from the rear, they weren't nearly as bad, but still should be done. The process is the same, just less work, only one piston on each side of the caliper, bigger piston, whole and easier to work with.


    ---------


    If you decide to do this, do at your own risk.
    Much respect and repped. This is how it's done ladies and gentlemen.

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