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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No

    Interesting video on running E85 on a non Flex-fuel equipped car


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    That's not really surprising. Nothing new here. E85 is fine for the car.

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    It's for this reason that I was rather surprised at AAA coming out to recommend strongly against the 15% ethanol blends being introduced around the country. I was trying to look up any studies that AAA cited, but, AAA cited none.

    http://newsroom.aaa.com/2012/12/susp...-e15-gasoline/

    This single article was recast by news channels with even wilder claims, such as "Ethanol blows up your engine."

    While I have concerns about 15% being used for everyone, I find it strange that they won't cite some sources. I've been running 40% ethanol (more or less) for months, with a few full tanks of E85 here and there.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Ferruccio Click here to enlarge
    This single article was recast by news channels with even wilder claims, such as "Ethanol blows up your engine."

    While I have concerns about 15% being used for everyone, I find it strange that they won't cite some sources. I've been running 40% ethanol (more or less) for months, with a few full tanks of E85 here and there.
    Does E85 have the potential to blow up a motor? Yes, but we've been tuning our cars with E85 use in mind. If you ran it in an aggressive blend long enough without adjusting your fueling & AFRs, a car without a FlexFuel sensor will likely run very lean, which after prolonged use could damage a delicate engine (not like the Chevy small block V8 that was used in the study OP posted)
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    I'm sure "big oil" has nothing to do with some of these wild claims. Wake up people, politics at its finest.
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    This video is stupid, they took a vehicle that just happened to possibly work. E85 runs fine in closed loop mode but not in open loop fueling where most cars aren't set for extreme rich values that would compensate for the extra fueling needs. My dad fell victim to this kind of thinking in his RAV4 and saw E85 that was quite a bit cheaper and thought he'd give it a try said he had to drive like my grandma and take about a minute or two to get up to speed or the car would start bucking and acting up, not good for an engine especially one with 250K miles on it.
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    That video showed pure e85 and no gasoline mixed with it. We are running 50/50 mix and some rebels run a bit more. Just wanted to show that it can be safe to run a small amount of less than 50% of E85. This video Also discredits Alot of myths about running E85 for a car not equipped for it. Just saying As this is the first time I have tried a mix of e85.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by brusk Click here to enlarge
    This video is stupid, they took a vehicle that just happened to possibly work. E85 runs fine in closed loop mode but not in open loop fueling where most cars aren't set for extreme rich values that would compensate for the extra fueling needs. My dad fell victim to this kind of thinking in his RAV4 and saw E85 that was quite a bit cheaper and thought he'd give it a try said he had to drive like my grandma and take about a minute or two to get up to speed or the car would start bucking and acting up, not good for an engine especially one with 250K miles on it.
    LOL, no offense but your dad is an idiot. Thats like thinking, hey that Diesel sure is cheaper, let me fill 'er up.
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    Problem with e85 is it prevents the car from knocking. Then before you know it boom. The tune is critical for older cars especially if you live in colder climates where the ethanol content changes during different seasons.

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    I will just run E30-E35 mix of E85 with 93 octane and with my meth mixture of 90/10 with about 570~ ml/min give or take should compensate for the fueling...When I do try the small shot of nitrous I will have have around 1200~ml/min...I think it should be safe but I will have to log it...My initial testing of the E30 mix was great.. I did feel some extra bump in power and the engine ran smoother.. I also saw my boost higher then it has been in a while at 16.5.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Andrew@activeautowerke Click here to enlarge
    Problem with e85 is it prevents the car from knocking. Then before you know it boom. The tune is critical for older cars especially if you live in colder climates where the ethanol content changes during different seasons.
    For larger mixtures of E85 I think it would be wise to make sure its properly tuned for it, but my search on it was rather to see what and how smaller mixtures like E30-E35 would hamper the safety of the engine..

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by lulz_m3 Click here to enlarge
    LOL, no offense but your dad is an idiot. Thats like thinking, hey that Diesel sure is cheaper, let me fill 'er up.
    He's old and uneducated when it comes to cars and like $#@! on the internet showing that you can run E85 in a normal car.

    As for the N54's running it that's a piece of cake since the DME shoots for a specific AFR and not a fixed amount of fuel injector pulse width as with other and older cars.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Cn555ic Click here to enlarge
    For larger mixtures of E85 I think it would be wise to make sure its properly tuned for it, but my search on it was rather to see what and how smaller mixtures like E30-E35 would hamper the safety of the engine..

    I was referring to using 100% e85 on something like a turbo e36 for example.

    I have been using 40-50% e85 in my 135 for a full year now every fill up. No problems besides my vanos bolts shearing off Friday ;(

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Andrew@activeautowerke Click here to enlarge
    Problem with e85 is it prevents the car from knocking. Then before you know it boom.
    Uh, what?

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    Okay I feel confident now to run E30-E35 and meth mix of 90/10. I just dont want to get the backend flash to enrich the a/f. I am hearing pros and cons of it, but I guess for others running more E85 than what I am using, they have no choice. For me I will stick to that mix...Thanks guys...People running E30-35 please chime in on what you think of my setup. I want to hear from people running E85 and not getting the backend flash and not using meth...THose I am most interested in feedback from

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Cn555ic Click here to enlarge
    Okay I feel confident now to run E30-E35 and meth mix of 90/10. I just dont want to get the backend flash to enrich the a/f. I am hearing pros and cons of it, but I guess for others running more E85 than what I am using, they have no choice. For me I will stick to that mix...Thanks guys...People running E30-35 please chime in on what you think of my setup. I want to hear from people running E85 and not getting the backend flash and not using meth...THose I am most interested in feedback from
    You gotta log it, each car is different. As long as your trims aren't maxing out you're fine. I run 50% all year with no meth and no issue. I can push a little higher like 55-60% but then I might get a random nuisance code like fuel mixture.

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    at idle and light cruise DME seems to adapt with LTFT... but anything beyond this it doesn't which is weird. I'm sure how LTFT is utilized can be changed (or selected) within the DME.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sered Click here to enlarge
    Uh, what?
    The knock threshold is much higher when using E85 than gas. If you push the power to much you could melt a piston.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Andrew@activeautowerke Click here to enlarge
    The knock threshold is much higher when using E85 than gas. If you push the power to much you could melt a piston.
    Are you saying that regular fuel would be knocking long before melting pistons, but E85 does t give you that warning in advance, so you can reach much higher temperatures without knocking? Does this include the fact that E85 burns cooler? Don't take this as rhetorical. I really do not know, and getting more information on this has been a pain in the butt, because I have to sift through a cloud of blind E85 hatred to try to figure out which pieces of information are useful and informative.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by benzy89 Click here to enlarge
    Does E85 have the potential to blow up a motor? Yes, but we've been tuning our cars with E85 use in mind. If you ran it in an aggressive blend long enough without adjusting your fueling & AFRs, a car without a FlexFuel sensor will likely run very lean, which after prolonged use could damage a delicate engine (not like the Chevy small block V8 that was used in the study OP posted)
    So, running lean for prolonged times will blow up an engine? I am trying to get my bearings with this.

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    If we are talking about the n54 /n55 this does not apply.

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    E85 doesn't have the same knock characteristics that gas has. Gas will tend to knock, make noise, and set off sensors before something terrible happens. E85 will knock, but does not give as much warning as gas. You would have to be really really abusing the car to melt something with E85, it allows you to tune very generously, but nothing is stupid proof.

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    First, the term lean is relative to the platform. I watched a dyno operators jaw drop when he saw my AFR on the JB4 when i first dyno'd there. To him 14 AFR even at onset of boost was way too high even though it dropped to a solid 11.5 up top.

    Second, too lean causes higher cylinder temps. too lean too long can burn a whole right in the top of your piston.

    Third, the increased cylinder temps causes detonation. Detonation causes undue stress/vibrations along the rotating assembly and is a common cause of spinning rod bearings.

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Ferruccio Click here to enlarge
    So, running lean for prolonged times will blow up an engine? I am trying to get my bearings with this.
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    ahhww snap, preignition!! Tell him about preignition!!
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    Do tell!
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