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  1. #51
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by benzy89 Click here to enlarge
    He Alumni? I don't know Georgetown's Undergrad Business Program, but it's obviously in the middle of DC and there's a LOT of networking to be done down there
    True. He isnt an alumni, but managed like $20M for an alumni from there. He has for like 20 years . Could pull some strings, most likely lol
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    I went to Purdue for undergrad and grad, as well as Cornell for grad school. Looking back over 20 years, let me suggest that you choose the school to get the type of knowledge you want.

    You indicated Wall Street as a goal, but that could be equities, debt instruments, buy-side or sell side transactions, financial modeling or strategy...... Decide what you want to do, then start to look at schools (profs. doing research in your specialty, school specialization (statistic, computer modeling, analytically techniques...)). Don't pick a school for a party's, pussy or Pernod. That will be there in varying amounts, depending on the campus.

    Good luck!

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    My GF went to Marist in upstate NY and she ended up landing a sick job @ Morgan Stanley fresh out of college. Major in Marketing, and Minor in Economics

    Apparently MS & GS heavily recruit from Marist from what she was telling me.
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  4. #54
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    UPDATE:

    I have a flight into NYC on March 10th, followed by a tour through Columbia (3/11), 2 days later at Cornell, and then followed by University of Pennsylvania. My boss (stock broker @ UBS) will be getting me a tour through wallstreet and onto the trading floors on the opening or closing bell on the 11th or 12th (really excited!). This will be followed by tours of the others schools, and when im done, ill be walking through Carnegie or Lehigh. I need to pick one of those two schools to visit (time constraint), what one would you all select?

    Also, this is my fist visiting an actual city. Naples is the largest city ive ever been to, and its quite small. Big Sky, MT is the only other place i live at, and thats only like 500 people lol


    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by yage202 Click here to enlarge
    I went to Purdue for undergrad and grad, as well as Cornell for grad school. Looking back over 20 years, let me suggest that you choose the school to get the type of knowledge you want.

    You indicated Wall Street as a goal, but that could be equities, debt instruments, buy-side or sell side transactions, financial modeling or strategy...... Decide what you want to do, then start to look at schools (profs. doing research in your specialty, school specialization (statistic, computer modeling, analytically techniques...)). Don't pick a school for a party's, pussy or Pernod. That will be there in varying amounts, depending on the campus.

    Good luck!
    Thanks for the advice. How did you like Purdue and Cornell? Ive been looking into Purdue, and have a tour at Cornell in March.

    As far as what i want to do, i want to be a stock-broker/financial adviser/investor. My ultimate goal would be to work for a firm, learn as much as i can, and then later down the road, create my own investment firm. But as college goes, im sure ill change my mind several times.
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    I'm going to Florida, getting the $#@! outta my parents house.

  6. #56
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bmwtek Click here to enlarge
    I'm going to Florida, getting the $#@! outta my parents house.
    Its too hot, id switch places if i could lol
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    I went to Bucknell (similar to Lehigh) back in the day for Computer Science Engineering. It was a great experience and have many friends working on Wall Street, Lockheed, GE, etc. Also, if you plan on going to wall street, be a compsci engineer with an economics/business minor. Wall Street is run by computers and your first job as an Analyst will make you live and die by Excel and other computer apps. If you have the ability to manipulate and write you own, you will simply dominate.

    When you are getting your MBA you will need the best possible school you can get. The network and name for your MBA will carry a lot more than your undergrad school.

    For your first job after undergrad, you need a decent school with a great GPA and a good connection to put your resume at the top of the list. Your undergrad job is all about knowing the right person or just being a star candidate. Going to a place like Columbia, Stanford, Harvard is ultra competitive and you may find being in the rat race is not worth it for the work/life balance. I have multiple friends that went to Harvard, they are great people, but they are nerds. College is more about learning how to take charge of your own life and manage yourself and your responsibilities. I know you may not understand this now, but your undergrad experience is one of the last times in your life you will have no serious responsibility. You want to be in a place were you can be challenged and do well, but know that you can have a great social life.

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    One other important note, if you are paying for this yourself, then go instate public wherever you are. It is not worth being in debt for 150k for any of these schools. Just carry a 3.8 or higher at that school, work hard for great summer experiences and all will be set. Your first job will pay off the loans and let you enjoy your 20s without being weighed down by terrible debt that you will still be paying off in your 30s.

    As long as you punish the GMAT, any business school will prefer you over a 3.5 at harvard any day because you had the common sense to save the dollars for their crazy expensive degree.

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    I agree with that to some degree. Doesn't need to be in-state but any great public school that gives you the best financial incentive to go there should also be considered. I have yet to see the advantage in going to the big name schools that put you in debt for the next ten to twenty years over a public school that lets your graduate free of debt and with the same pay.

    Are you sure about Wall Street? I know a lot of my friends changed their goals halfway through school when they realized that there were other companies with better paychecks and that are better to work for than the giants they were originally hoping for.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Eric335 Click here to enlarge
    How did you like Purdue and Cornell?
    I'd rate both schools as serious for what I went to school for, Mechanical Engineering. Both are in the middle of nowhere, which lent itself to focus. In both cases the student body was inviting and supportive. If you like the campus atmosphere they could very well work for you. To be honest with you both names have carried weight in business beyond my expectation!

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    Why would you get an M.E degree if you want to work on the stock market? That would be a waste, M.E is not easy and you will not use much if any of it by doing that sort of business. Also, I did not go to a big name school, but I was big on connecting and internships and I got in the door of big companies that way. Connectivity isnt everything, because if you suck your connections will know that, they are smart; most of the time. So even if you dont go to the biggest school, you can still make it big if you know the right people, albeit big schools make that easier.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DBFIU Click here to enlarge
    Why would you get an M.E degree if you want to work on the stock market? That would be a waste, M.E is not easy and you will not use much if any of it by doing that sort of business. Also, I did not go to a big name school, but I was big on connecting and internships and I got in the door of big companies that way. Connectivity isnt everything, because if you suck your connections will know that, they are smart; most of the time. So even if you dont go to the biggest school, you can still make it big if you know the right people, albeit big schools make that easier.
    Working on Wall Street require good quantitative abilities. Because engineering programs usually require strong math and the ability to understand complex systems, it is a good fit for the algorithm based trading that runs wall street. Undergraduates first job out of college on wall street are analyst positions where they are reading financial statements, listening to conference calls, and using excel to create models of companies and predict future value. Engineers are usually better at this than Business majors, but in the end it just comes down to the person. On top of that, if you fail to get a position on wall street, you have a solid degree that lets you get a decent paying job.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by GoBlando Click here to enlarge
    Working on Wall Street require good quantitative abilities. Because engineering programs usually require strong math and the ability to understand complex systems, it is a good fit for the algorithm based trading that runs wall street. Undergraduates first job out of college on wall street are analyst positions where they are reading financial statements, listening to conference calls, and using excel to create models of companies and predict future value. Engineers are usually better at this than Business majors, but in the end it just comes down to the person. On top of that, if you fail to get a position on wall street, you have a solid degree that lets you get a decent paying job.
    Software engineering will be more useful to you then M.E.
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    In the Mecheng programs, I went through the skill set I learned applied broadly. I started out as a power train engineer for GM and ended up in fiber optics and photonics, before I retired.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DBFIU Click here to enlarge
    Why would you get an M.E degree if you want to work on the stock market? That would be a waste, M.E is not easy and you will not use much if any of it by doing that sort of business. Also, I did not go to a big name school, but I was big on connecting and internships and I got in the door of big companies that way. Connectivity isnt everything, because if you suck your connections will know that, they are smart; most of the time. So even if you dont go to the biggest school, you can still make it big if you know the right people, albeit big schools make that easier.
    Because MBAs are losing their value, and fast. A rigorous engineering degree or computer science degree combined with a finance degree would be a pretty damn good ticket. I know several engineers that have come out of Cornell or UCF and gone straight to the Street, while MBAs are struggling to find a job. MBAs are turning into the sociology major lol not knocking it, just saying. Also, i might want to apply to BMW M Engineering or Merc AMG after college, but thats more of a dream job than a reality.


    Im starting to lean more towards a computer science/computer engineering type of degree, since wall street is ran by computers and what not.


    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DBFIU Click here to enlarge
    Software engineering will be more useful to you then M.E.

    Ive been considering this and computer science degrees. One of my hobbies is building computers (my current beast is a liquid-cooled 3570k overclocked), so i know that is a major that i would enjoy.
    Last edited by Eric335; 02-12-2013 at 10:14 PM.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by GoBlando Click here to enlarge
    Working on Wall Street require good quantitative abilities. Because engineering programs usually require strong math and the ability to understand complex systems, it is a good fit for the algorithm based trading that runs wall street. Undergraduates first job out of college on wall street are analyst positions where they are reading financial statements, listening to conference calls, and using excel to create models of companies and predict future value. Engineers are usually better at this than Business majors, but in the end it just comes down to the person. On top of that, if you fail to get a position on wall street, you have a solid degree that lets you get a decent paying job.
    This^

    The analytical skills are what the firms want, not what you learned (for the most part). As i said above, i have known several engineers (mechanical and aerospace) that have gone to wall street (mainly from Cornell, but one from UCF).
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DBFIU Click here to enlarge
    Software engineering will be more useful to you then M.E.
    I agree and mentioned that in my first post. I think any intelligent person that is going to a good school should graduate with at least a minor in Computer Science.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Eric335 Click here to enlarge
    Because MBAs are losing their value, and fast. A rigorous engineering degree or computer science degree combined with a finance degree would be a pretty damn good ticket. I know several engineers that have come out of Cornell or UCF and gone straight to the Street, while MBAs are struggling to find a job. MBAs are turning into the sociology major lol not knocking it, just saying.
    I agree with that sentiment but only for the bottom and middle tier schools. If you get an MBA at an Ivy league or well respected university you simply have a lot of doors opened to you that aren't there otherwise. Private Equity and hedge funds always require them. But that is only the Wall Street side of things. An MBA is important if you are a person that doesn't have the motivation to make something of your own. It allows you to climb the corporate ladder because of good performance (not exceptional or amazing).

    If you want true success, you need smarts, balls, and patience. If you have those things, the rest will follow.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Eric335 Click here to enlarge
    Because MBAs are losing their value, and fast. A rigorous engineering degree or computer science degree combined with a finance degree would be a pretty damn good ticket. I know several engineers that have come out of Cornell or UCF and gone straight to the Street, while MBAs are struggling to find a job. MBAs are turning into the sociology major lol not knocking it, just saying. Also, i might want to apply to BMW M Engineering or Merc AMG after college, but thats more of a dream job than a reality.


    Im starting to lean more towards a computer science/computer engineering type of degree, since wall street is ran by computers and what not.





    Ive been considering this and computer science degrees. One of my hobbies is building computers (my current beast is a liquid-cooled 3570k overclocked), so i know that is a major that i would enjoy.
    MBAs are losing value because the people getting them today are retarded. Everyone wants an MBA, and when you flood the market with the same product, no one wants it anymore. Get a computer science or software eng degree, M.E. is only if you really want to be an M.E. It will not help you on wall street like a computer degree will. I work as a full time M.E. in turbomachine industry and I kick myself in the nuts everytime I wish I could write a macro or program, but I can't because only the software people do that. If you can program a computer, you can get a job anywhere and replace 10 people and make their money. Trust me.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by GoBlando Click here to enlarge
    I agree with that sentiment but only for the bottom and middle tier schools. If you get an MBA at an Ivy league or well respected university you simply have a lot of doors opened to you that aren't there otherwise. Private Equity and hedge funds always require them. But that is only the Wall Street side of things. An MBA is important if you are a person that doesn't have the motivation to make something of your own. It allows you to climb the corporate ladder because of good performance (not exceptional or amazing).

    If you want true success, you need smarts, balls, and patience. If you have those things, the rest will follow.
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DBFIU Click here to enlarge
    MBAs are losing value because the people getting them today are retarded. Everyone wants an MBA, and when you flood the market with the same product, no one wants it anymore. Get a computer science or software eng degree, M.E. is only if you really want to be an M.E. It will not help you on wall street like a computer degree will. I work as a full time M.E. in turbomachine industry and I kick myself in the nuts everytime I wish I could write a macro or program, but I can't because only the software people do that. If you can program a computer, you can get a job anywhere and replace 10 people and make their money. Trust me.
    Thanks for the information guys! Really appreciate it!
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    Computer science is not computer engineering. They're for different types of people. I switched to CS from Business and couldn't be happier with my choice
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Brey335i Click here to enlarge
    Computer science is not computer engineering.
    This is soooo true. its the difference between hardware and software.

    Unless things have changed dramatically, engineers have more flexibility with job choices. The amount of programming that I had to do in undergrad and grad school put a foundation on my coding skills in Fortran 77 to understand what is needed in business. If you truly want to understand the applied physics behind what is going on then engineering is the only way to go.

    If you want to be the best software code writer and implementer, then computer science/engineering is the ticket. If an MBA enhances what you have accomplished so far, go for it. It has become, in many cases a check mark in the box of being competent in business practices.

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    Hello all, time for another update!

    UPDATE:


    Recently i had the opportunity to go and visit several of the schools on the top of my college list. The ones i visited were: Columbia, Cornell, Carnegie Mellon, and University of Pennsylvania. Basically, i met up with a few friends on Wall St and spent a few days in NYC, got to meet some big-wigs at UBS, and saw a friend from my high-school who now works for UBS. Then i got official tours/info sessions with Columbia and U Penn, walked through Carnegie Mellon (they are on Spring Break, so i only saw the campus), and an info session with Cornell (no tour, although i walked around FREEZING for an hour or so).

    From everything i saw, watched, learned, and experienced, i am 100% certain that U Penn is my top choice now. Ill be applying to the Wharton School of Business this November. I realized that i need to narrow down what degrees/majors/concentrations i want to pursue, so i have decided that finance/economics (you can do dual concentrations at Wharton) is what ill go with if i end up getting into UPenn. If not, my next top choice of the colleges is Cornell, and i would do an engineering major (either Computer science or something similar, not terribly sure on that...) with business classes on the side (minor, maybe). Im making back-up plans as well, but i wont post those on here.

    So, ask any questions if you have them. If anyone here went to UPenn, let me know how you liked it!

    Here are some photos from my trip:

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    The last two are College Hall at UPenn. Impressive building in person. Click on any of the photos to see a larger size.


    -Eric
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    Be prepared if you go to UPenn -- The students don't like to adventure around & stay on the campus (so don't expect to find a lot of friends that like to adventure around Philly for bars & sporting events). It's also a VERY liberal community, so if you happen to be a conservative/libertarian, you'll be in the minority.

    I worked in South PA for 4 months on the Presidential Campaign with UPenn, Temple, Drexel & LaSalle college students (all are in Philly). I can immediately tell you, the UPenn kids were the most difficult to deal with -- all of them felt entitled, spoiled and refused to get "hands on". The Wharton School of Business is the #1 in the country & UPenn is a phenomenal school, so congrats if you get in, but you might want to overnite/see if there's any students you can speak with to determine if you'll mesh with the student community for the ~4 yrs you'll be there.
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by benzy89 Click here to enlarge
    Be prepared if you go to UPenn -- The students don't like to adventure around & stay on the campus (so don't expect to find a lot of friends that like to adventure around Philly for bars & sporting events). It's also a VERY liberal community, so if you happen to be a conservative/libertarian, you'll be in the minority.

    I worked in South PA for 4 months on the Presidential Campaign with UPenn, Temple, Drexel & LaSalle college students (all are in Philly). I can immediately tell you, the UPenn kids were the most difficult to deal with -- all of them felt entitled, spoiled and refused to get "hands on". The Wharton School of Business is the #1 in the country & UPenn is a phenomenal school, so congrats if you get in, but you might want to overnite/see if there's any students you can speak with to determine if you'll mesh with the student community for the ~4 yrs you'll be there.
    Very interesting. While i was only there a whopping 3 hours, i felt like the students that i saw (probably 500, and it wasnt near the Wharton school) were very normal/nice compared to elsewhere (read: Columbia/Cornell. Those kids werent snobby, but downright weird/awkward/creepy). Ill have to see if i can overnight or do something like that. Thanks for the info though. I am definitely a conservative, but unfortunately all of the schools ive toured have been fairly liberal.

    Thanks for the insight into the student population. From the folks ive talked to (several college advisors/alumnis/etc) it is by far the most 'social' of the schools ive been looking at (aside from the safeties like UVA or UCF). Ive often heard it described as the 'social Ivy'. One thing that i did not like in other schools was the student population, i just found that there were too many ethnics (yeah, i know, i know), weirdos/socially awkward kids, and nerds. Im smart, but i like to have a good time too lol


    Also, if i dont get into UPenn, ill be looking at Notre Dame/Cornell/UVA as backups. Id love to apply to Stanford, but its a no-go with the family because of how far away it is (plus its California, which they dont love..).


    Here's a website that gives some good insight into the college:

    http://www.studentsreview.com/PA/UPE.html

    http://collegeprowler.com/university-of-pennsylvania/
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