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  1. #26
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    Nice, your correct. Thanks for the post! I'll get these.

    I understand vertical integration and manufacturing, just surprised BMW doesn't have more protection in place this early in the game on these parts...
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    ESS 6XX kit

  2. #27
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    No problem. I'm not sure exactly how its possible for Turner and ECS to grind off the M logo and sell the front arm kit for a 200 dollar discount, but I'm glad they do.

    Good luck with the upgrades. I feel suspension is often overlooked for power upgrades, but in a street car, suspension makes the car so much more fun. Like I said, I would give Ground Control a look before you make your coil over purchase. I've never spoke with them directly, but I've heard really good things, and all of their kits are made to order. The fact that they tune the dampers to the spring rate you choose is really something that sets them apart. Suspension is a system, as said above, and the dampers need to be tuned to the springs for everything to work at its best.

  3. #28
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    No problem. I'm not sure exactly how its possible for Turner and ECS to grind off the M logo and sell the front arm kit for a 200 dollar discount, but I'm glad they do.

    Good luck with the upgrades. I feel suspension is often overlooked for power upgrades, but in a street car, suspension makes the car so much more fun. Like I said, I would give Ground Control a look before you make your coil over purchase. I've never spoke with them directly, but I've heard really good things, and all of their kits are made to order. The fact that they tune the dampers to the spring rate you choose is really something that sets them apart. Suspension is a system, as said above, and the dampers need to be tuned to the springs for everything to work at its best.

    What is your exact setup?
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    ESS 6XX kit

  4. #29
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bobS Click here to enlarge
    What is your exact setup?
    Unfortunately I only bought the car in August, but I do plan on buying the Ground Control single adjustable street/school kit.

    http://www.ground-control-store.com/.../II=903/CA=165

    I would like to opt for their hybrid caster/camber plates, however, to try to prevent my 335 from sounding like my late Maxima with race style plates.

    This might not happen until next year though, I already have a Wavetrac, front M3 arms, and urethane diff bushings to install. I don't have a garage to work in and its too damn cold to work outside right now, not to mention these parts get expensive, and I plan on having this car for a while so spacing out the modifications seems to be the thing to do.

    I like how Ground Control uses the Koni Yellow dampers, those are great parts. Once they match them to the springs you choose, they never need adjusted. The Koni's are powder coated and they put them in powder coated housings in the front to stand up the salt spray. Eibach is also a world class company, and their 2.5 inch linear coil over springs are also made to last.

  5. #30
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    I would look into the "TRW" branded M front arms. I bought them from ECS for about 200 less than the BMW brand parts. When I got them I noticed that the M logo had simply been ground off with a die grinder. Nothing that would affect the strength of the arm, just so that they can be sold as TRW parts and not BMW. TRW looks to be the OEM for these parts. So the arms are the exact same parts, just without the M logo.
    Man, I wish these were available when I did my stuff...these are a recent development.

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bobS Click here to enlarge
    Lol nice, I'll take your word for it. Do I need the ground control camber plates?

    I'm thinking I'll get the m parts and coils and call it a day.....
    I'd definitely do the GC plates, the stock parts introduce a significant amount of squish and undesirable alignment characteristics into the system. And IMHO, I'd do the 3 Megan arms in the rear instead of the M parts, the sealed ball joints are nicer and better than m3 stuff, and they make alignments infinitely easier and significantly more versatile.

    Also I forget if I made this clear or not, but I would go with Delrin diff bushings from the get go. DEFIV's observations on urethane as it relates to the diff bushings and wheel hop (still allows it, just a higher and less noticeable frequency) has me nervous, and I may end up changing them for Delrin+the lockdown kit, as I really don't wish to destroy my axles, driveshaft, or worst of all, my diff.
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    Unfortunately I only bought the car in August, but I do plan on buying the Ground Control single adjustable street/school kit.

    http://www.ground-control-store.com/.../II=903/CA=165

    I would like to opt for their hybrid caster/camber plates, however, to try to prevent my 335 from sounding like my late Maxima with race style plates.

    This might not happen until next year though, I already have a Wavetrac, front M3 arms, and urethane diff bushings to install. I don't have a garage to work in and its too damn cold to work outside right now, not to mention these parts get expensive, and I plan on having this car for a while so spacing out the modifications seems to be the thing to do.

    I like how Ground Control uses the Koni Yellow dampers, those are great parts. Once they match them to the springs you choose, they never need adjusted. The Koni's are powder coated and they put them in powder coated housings in the front to stand up the salt spray. Eibach is also a world class company, and their 2.5 inch linear coil over springs are also made to last.
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    No problem. I'm not sure exactly how its possible for Turner and ECS to grind off the M logo and sell the front arm kit for a 200 dollar discount, but I'm glad they do.

    Good luck with the upgrades. I feel suspension is often overlooked for power upgrades, but in a street car, suspension makes the car so much more fun. Like I said, I would give Ground Control a look before you make your coil over purchase. I've never spoke with them directly, but I've heard really good things, and all of their kits are made to order. The fact that they tune the dampers to the spring rate you choose is really something that sets them apart. Suspension is a system, as said above, and the dampers need to be tuned to the springs for everything to work at its best.
    +1 on your thoughts. A properly set up suspension has really made my car significantly more entertaining. And I can personally attest to the GC street plates being 100% great at firming things up and allowing adjustibility without that race plate clanging. IMHO, Konis are great but are somewhat outdated, the tech in the KW dampers is superior to the Konis, though they still are a great product. If you want to do a Koni-based product, I'd recommend taking a look at the HPA Koni kit...same thing as the GC with the ability to customize spring rates with the dampers built to match (though obviously spring rate selection should be done with great care and consideration for the fundamentals of suspension design, something that is often applied incorrectly), great customer service, and most importantly, they use Swift springs, which are superior to the ERS springs used by GC.
    Click here to enlarge

  6. #31
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    @DefactoM6

    Thanks for sharing the information on the KW coil overs. I will look into them. What specific features make them superior to the Koni dampers?

    Ground Control aslo give you the ability to select whatever spring rate you wish. Basically you tell them what you want (full race, street/track, or full street) and they will recommend a spring rate. Once the rate is chosen, the damper valving is modified, and the dampers are adjusted on the shock dyno to match them to the springs.

    The HPA kit looks very similar, but the Ground control kit comes with the all important caster/camber plates, and it includes the lower M3 arms for the rear. With the Vorshlag cater/camber plates, the HPA kits looks to be $500 more than the GC kit (please correct me if I am wrong).

    One thing that stands out about the GC kit, is the caster/camber plates are designed so the spherical bearing does not support the weight of the car. Typically, spherical bearings only have ratings for radial loads, like the side to side and front to back loads seen when locating a strut shaft on a McPherson strut front suspensions. These loads are perpendicular to the strut shaft. They are not rated for axial loads, or loads produced by the weight of the car acting up on the bearing through the spring perch, parallel to the strut shaft. This results in plates that get noisy over time. Even the best spherical bearings wont prevent this, as they are not designed to support axial loads. I went through this with my last car. I bought the best bearings on the market to replace what came with my plates, and they were only noise free for six months, maybe

    Now this information comes from reading on the internet, and I have not held the GC and Vorshlag plates personally. I would call them for more details.

  7. #32
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    I think these will be going on the 1er

    http://www.brz-parts.com/bcbr135i.html
    2011 335is DCT, collecting parts....


  8. #33
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    @DefactoM6

    Thanks for sharing the information on the KW coil overs. I will look into them. What specific features make them superior to the Koni dampers?
    @ajm8127 My pleasure, happy to make the journey easier for anyone who wishes to listen! Click here to enlarge. Basically, what makes them superior to the Konis is the valving design/technology. The KWs have vastly superior valving design/tech that is very similar to Ohlins TTX technology (as seen in the Ohlins R&T, one of the nicest monotube designs around) in their real mechanical function. The use of defective disk and coils spring with discrete high and low speed circuits makes the magic happen on the KWs. All the other junk about dampers doesn’t matter as much compared to the valve design. And the KWs have this area really well taken care of, far more so than the ~25 year old Koni yellow valve design. It was for this reason that I never really considered the Koni-based kits. Only others I looked at were the JRZ RS1s (Would have needed a revalve and some customization to work with the rates of the springs I would've run, mega $$$) and the Ohlins R&T (sensational damper, but the spring rates are WAY off for anyone who isn't running a puny stock rear bar and a LSD; same problem of a staggering amount of $$$ for relatively diminishing returns). And don't get me wrong, Koni makes a great product that still works very well, depending on the application. For my application, however, it simply wasn't a consideration, as the KW's valve technology is superior, and the spring rates on the SCs using M3 sways and a LSD made numbers that were perfect for a street car right out of the box.

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127
    Ground Control aslo give you the ability to select whatever spring rate you wish. Basically you tell them what you want (full race, street/track, or full street) and they will recommend a spring rate. Once the rate is chosen, the damper valving is modified, and the dampers are adjusted on the shock dyno to match them to the springs.
    HPA does the exact same thing as GC, as far as I recall. That said, IMHO, the ability to play with spring rates is a blessing and a curse, as it can lead someone away from one's goal. What do you want out of your car? What kind of driving do you do/what is the car used for? What are your priorities/what is most important?

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127
    The HPA kit looks very similar, but the Ground control kit comes with the all important caster/camber plates, and it includes the lower M3 arms for the rear. With the Vorshlag cater/camber plates, the HPA kits looks to be $500 more than the GC kit (please correct me if I am wrong).

    One thing that stands out about the GC kit, is the caster/camber plates are designed so the spherical bearing does not support the weight of the car. Typically, spherical bearings only have ratings for radial loads, like the side to side and front to back loads seen when locating a strut shaft on a McPherson strut front suspensions. These loads are perpendicular to the strut shaft. They are not rated for axial loads, or loads produced by the weight of the car acting up on the bearing through the spring perch, parallel to the strut shaft. This results in plates that get noisy over time. Even the best spherical bearings wont prevent this, as they are not designed to support axial loads. I went through this with my last car. I bought the best bearings on the market to replace what came with my plates, and they were only noise free for six months, maybe

    Now this information comes from reading on the internet, and I have not held the GC and Vorshlag plates personally. I would call them for more details.
    The HPA kit is indeed similar, and the reason I'd go with the HPA kit over the GC kit mostly relates to the use of Swift springs. IMHO, while the m3 lower link is nice and is an upgrade, there are other things that are in far greater need of an upgrade/money than the lower link, namely the toe arms, upper links and guide rods, with the toe arms being by far the biggest deal. Furthermore, if one uses the m3 camber link, it prevents one from using the Megan (hardrace) toe arm, which is ironically arguably the best designed toe link for the application, as the other aftermarket pieces are not designed with adequate strength or with the right bearings, and begin to make noise very quickly. If I were designing the kit, I would've skipped the m3 lower link and included the Megan toe arms instead. That said, having a camber plate is pretty critical if your aim is performance, as the stock mounts deflect over 35 mm from compression to rebound, so it has a huge effect in both dampening and lateral loads as well, which cause poor handling when the car is driven hard. There is nothing preventing you from ordering a GC street plate to work with the HPA kit, as they can design camber plates to work with any application. If you don't want a noisy plate, definitely stick with the GC street plates...I have had that precise experience when using spherical bearing-based plates on previous vehicles of mine.
    Click here to enlarge

  9. #34
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    I've got a set of M3 front control arms in my garage awaiting install and I'm a bit apprehensive because I'm worried about the alignment afterwards. The one alignment shop I've used hasn't done well on our 370z, 4 tries so far and still drives weird.

    My car as-is rides perfectly straight and is not jumpy on bumps or anything. I'm worried that after I do this mod and take the car in for alignment, that it will be a never-ending saga. I hesitate to go somewhere else, because this shop is 'supposed' to be decent and so how much worse are the other shops?

    Should I take this to the dealer and just get the front-end aligned? I'm worried they'll charge me a ridiculous amount.

    Also, what front-end specs are you guys getting aligned to with the M3 control arms? I hear it adds 1.5deg of neg camber, but how much toe and caster, etc?

  10. #35
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    I had the BC Racing extreme low coilovers on my car. The ride wasn't great, but they did go as low as I wanted. I adjusted them a lot but couldn't find a happy balance between bounciness and stiffness. I ended up just making them very stiff, much better for a low ride.

    My buddy has the KW STs which are the same as the KW V1 but made with galvanized steel. They rust easier but we don't have those issues in Florida. The ride was much better than my BCs. They don't go as low though.

    Here's my car with the BC's:

    Click here to enlarge
    Daily: 2007 Montego Blue E92 335i - Stock
    Weekend: 2008 Graffiti CBR 600RR - Two Brothers | CBR Heaven | Shogun | Motovation | Power Commander | Honda Racing


  11. #36
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by EDM92 Click here to enlarge
    I had the BC Racing extreme low coilovers on my car. The ride wasn't great, but they did go as low as I wanted. I adjusted them a lot but couldn't find a happy balance between bounciness and stiffness. I ended up just making them very stiff, much better for a low ride.

    My buddy has the KW STs which are the same as the KW V1 but made with galvanized steel. They rust easier but we don't have those issues in Florida. The ride was much better than my BCs. They don't go as low though.

    Here's my car with the BC's:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im.../F080j-1.jpg?1
    Thanks for the review on the BC. I'm pretty sure most people on this thread are trying to gain performance value from the CO setup and aren't really concerned with how low the car will be. Actually i'm sure we'd all be pretty happy to keep the car similar to stock ride height while still gaining the chassis firmness from the CO setup.
    2011 335is DCT, collecting parts....


  12. #37
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sered Click here to enlarge
    I've got a set of M3 front control arms in my garage awaiting install and I'm a bit apprehensive because I'm worried about the alignment afterwards. The one alignment shop I've used hasn't done well on our 370z, 4 tries so far and still drives weird.

    My car as-is rides perfectly straight and is not jumpy on bumps or anything. I'm worried that after I do this mod and take the car in for alignment, that it will be a never-ending saga. I hesitate to go somewhere else, because this shop is 'supposed' to be decent and so how much worse are the other shops?

    Should I take this to the dealer and just get the front-end aligned? I'm worried they'll charge me a ridiculous amount.

    Also, what front-end specs are you guys getting aligned to with the M3 control arms? I hear it adds 1.5deg of neg camber, but how much toe and caster, etc?
    Dealer alignments are usually 180-200 bucks. The M3 arms add 0.5deg, not 1.5. My alignment is as follows:

    Camber: 1.40F, 1.60R
    Toe: 0F, 0.07R (in)
    Caster: 7.50 (not adjustable with my plates)

    Not sure what you would be able to get in terms of front camber without plates and the alignment pins knocked out, but when you bring it to that shop, give them the exact specifications you want, have them align, then have them drive it around the block a few times, then put it back up on the rack to check it again, adjust, drive, check one final time, you should have no problems whatsoever. For someone doing an alignment who isn't trying to just get you out of his hair, this is what they should be doing, and it should result in an accurate, problem free alignment.

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bigdnno98 Click here to enlarge
    Thanks for the review on the BC. I'm pretty sure most people on this thread are trying to gain performance value from the CO setup and aren't really concerned with how low the car will be. Actually i'm sure we'd all be pretty happy to keep the car similar to stock ride height while still gaining the chassis firmness from the CO setup.
    Yeah, unfortunately those BCs are good for being low, and that's about it. A friend got them and installed them, and I absolutely despised them. Made the car handle worse, and it was quite uncomfortable. I know that others on other platforms have better luck with them, but the ride was atrocious on this platform.
    Click here to enlarge

  13. #38
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    I really don't want to go to low, I just want the car to handle well. I might call VAC and get thier opinion. My ride height is perfect now, i don't rub the front lip or bottom out, but the handling sucks on stock shocks and eibach sport springs!
    Click here to enlarge
    ESS 6XX kit

  14. #39
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bobS Click here to enlarge
    I really don't want to go to low, I just want the car to handle well. I might call VAC and get thier opinion. My ride height is perfect now, i don't rub the front lip or bottom out, but the handling sucks on stock shocks and eibach sport springs!
    I agree with this. Going from an Evo to a 135i makes it painfully obvious. The BMW def need some stiffness to make the car feel less squishy. I'm looking for the best bang for the buck. CO setup that improves handling but doesn't break the bank.
    2011 335is DCT, collecting parts....


  15. #40
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    To me it sounds like the KW offerings may be a little more advanced than the Koni dampers in the GC kit, but you get everything you need in the GC kit, plus you get the damper dyno matched to the springs, as well as the ability to choose the spring rate best suited to your application.

    The KW coil covers have stainless bodies, but the GC kit is powder coated so both will fair well with salt. I can attest the Koni bodies don't rust easily after running them for a few winters on a different car.

    I spoke with a representative from Ground Control about the ride height of my car with their kit. They informed me that obtaining the factory sport suspension ride height is possibly with their kit. This is important to me because I need to keep a reasonable amount of ground clearance to cope with local roads, and the ZSP ride height is the ride height the suspension was meant to be run at, which can be significant with regards to suspension geometry.

    The Ground Control kit is probably still going to be the kit I choose when converting to coil covers. I like the fact that the kit is complete, and the dampers are dyno matched to the springs. I don't need the absolute best in technology, but the Koni yellow sport dampers are more than capable parts, with a reliable reputation. They also carry a lifetime warranty.

  16. #41
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    I did some more research, and if you cross reference the below documents, you will find that the Koni Sport dampers for the 335 (both AWD and RWD) are twin tube low pressure gas front and rear:

    http://www.koni-na.com/pdfcatalogs/K...ortCatalog.pdf - Page 35
    http://www.koni-na.com/pdf/AutoCatalog.pdf - Page 11

    This means a comparison with the KW Variant 2 is apples to apples since both are twin tube low pressure gas rebound adjustable only dampers. The Street Comforts are also rebound adjustable only for the 335.

    As for the springs, the GC kit is definitely linear, and I believe KW Variant 2 are progressive, front and rear. Street Comforts also appear to be progressive.

    For $2K, you get more pieces with the GC kit (the caster/camber plates are included), but the KW's are stainless, as mentioned above (except the Street Comforts it appears), however, the powder coating on the Koni's has proven to be reliable in the winter, for me at least. The Street Comforts for the 335 are Galvanized, according the KW's online store.

    What is odd, now that I am looking at the KW online store, is for a RWD 335 sedan, they do not list a Variant 2 system. Only Street Comfort, Variant 1, Variant 3, and Club Sport. Not really sure what that is about because online stores like ModBargains has Variant 2 systems for sale for the 335 RWD sedan and coupe. They don't list a Variant 2 kit for the AWD chassis, so maybe that is the disconnect.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ajm8127 Click here to enlarge
    I did some more research, and if you cross reference the below documents, you will find that the Koni Sport dampers for the 335 (both AWD and RWD) are twin tube low pressure gas front and rear:

    http://www.koni-na.com/pdfcatalogs/K...ortCatalog.pdf - Page 35
    http://www.koni-na.com/pdf/AutoCatalog.pdf - Page 11

    This means a comparison with the KW Variant 2 is apples to apples since both are twin tube low pressure gas rebound adjustable only dampers. The Street Comforts are also rebound adjustable only for the 335.

    As for the springs, the GC kit is definitely linear, and I believe KW Variant 2 are progressive, front and rear. Street Comforts also appear to be progressive.

    For $2K, you get more pieces with the GC kit (the caster/camber plates are included), but the KW's are stainless, as mentioned above (except the Street Comforts it appears), however, the powder coating on the Koni's has proven to be reliable in the winter, for me at least. The Street Comforts for the 335 are Galvanized, according the KW's online store.

    What is odd, now that I am looking at the KW online store, is for a RWD 335 sedan, they do not list a Variant 2 system. Only Street Comfort, Variant 1, Variant 3, and Club Sport. Not really sure what that is about because online stores like ModBargains has Variant 2 systems for sale for the 335 RWD sedan and coupe. They don't list a Variant 2 kit for the AWD chassis, so maybe that is the disconnect.

    Please don't take this the wrong way, because it is pretty clear that you have your heart set on that GC kit (which is a good setup), and there's nothing wrong with that, but many shocks are twin tube, low pressure gas...and the KW isn't even one of them (it's oil pressure, not gas, for starters). It's the way that style/theory implemented which makes them different. Comparing the Koni to the KW is in no way apples to apples. But even then, you are comparing them on the most basic of principals.. By that logic, I should've compared the BC coilovers to the JRZs because they are both monotube dampers...but I would never have dreamed of it, because we know that is just about where the similarities end between those two dampers. Comparing the Konis on the merit of being twin tube, low pressure gas (which the KW isn't) is equivalent to comparing a 1M to a Cummins powered Ram because both have 24v inline 6es. Don't get me wrong, the Konis are pretty good for what they are, and just like the 1M vs Cummins Ram example, each engine has strengths and weaknesses depending on the purpose/application. But the KWs are very different...very different indeed.
    Last edited by DefactoM6; 01-10-2013 at 07:56 PM.
    Click here to enlarge

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DefactoM6 Click here to enlarge
    Please don't take this the wrong way, because it is pretty clear that you have your heart set on that GC kit (which is a good setup), and there's nothing wrong with that, but many shocks are twin tube, low pressure gas...and the KW isn't even one of them (it's oil pressure, not gas, for starters). It's the way that style/theory implemented which makes them different. Comparing the Koni to the KW is in no way apples to apples. But even then, you are comparing them on the most basic of principals.. By that logic, I should've compared the BC coilovers to the JRZs because they are both monotube dampers...but I would never have dreamed of it, because we know that is just about where the similarities end between those two dampers. Comparing the Konis on the merit of being twin tube, low pressure gas (which the KW isn't) is equivalent to comparing a 1M to a Cummins powered Ram because both have 24v inline 6es. Don't get me wrong, the Konis are pretty good for what they are, and just like the 1M vs Cummins Ram example, each engine has strengths and weaknesses depending on the purpose/application. But the KWs are very different...very different indeed.
    I don't have my heart set on GC, but for my price point it seems like the best option. I am an objective individual, and like facts to drive my decision making. I am not trying to start an internet argument, we are just talking about the merits of each setup here as educated individuals to help people make the decision that makes the most sense to them.

    Comparing one manufacturer's implementation of a given technology to another manufacturer's is applicable to this discussion. We talk about price, performance, and reliability to figure out which part is right for who in what situation. I am not saying something like twin tube dampers on a 335 are the same as twin tube dampers on, say, a turbo diesel Dodge Ram, but I am saying two twin tube dampers on a 335 or 135 can be directly compared because they implement the same technology on the same platform. One may be more reliable, perform better, cost more, or all three, but if you don't need that performance or reliability, you can choose a damper that costs less. And of course, some products are just a better value than others.

    The diagram here:

    http://kw-suspension.com/us/kw_valve_technology.php

    is of a twin tube low pressure gas damper. Please compare it to the diagram in the Koni catalog, first page figure 'B':

    http://www.koni-na.com/pdfcatalogs/K...ortCatalog.pdf

    The fourth bullet point on this page:

    http://kw-suspension.com/us/kw_sprin...nstruction.php

    specifically says the KW dampers are twin tube, and as such I know they implement a low pressure gas (usually nitrogen) reservoir to prevent cavitation of the damper's oil.

    As the shaft slides into the body it displaces oil and the gas compresses. This very displacement of oil is what gives compression damping in the twin tube setup (through detail area #4 in the first link). Same as the Koni Sport dampers for the 335. Without the gas reservoir, the shaft could not travel into the body of the damper, because the shaft must displace some of the damper's oil and, for all intents and purposes, oil is incompressible. Now there is such a design that just uses regular air instead of low pressure gas (low pressure relative to the monotube damper), but low pressure gas is desirable because it prevents oil cavitation that would otherwise happen as the piston travels up and down in the damper body. I must assume for a higher performance damper KW would implement low pressure gas to prevent this cavitation, as cavitation would drastically alter the ability of the damper to do its job and would cause a very noticeable difference in the handling of the vehicle.

    If you can find documentation that states the KW dampers (for the 135 or 335) are not twin tube, I will be more than happy to read it. I will even recant what I have said above right here in this thread if I am legitimately wrong. I am going on the best information I have, and that information says the KW dampers are twin tube, and that design implements a low pressure gas reservoir, which is the same design Koni uses in their Sport model for the platforms of interest (135, 335).

  19. #44
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    Ok I'm going to go with kw v2 coilovers....still on the fence about the m parts....
    Click here to enlarge
    ESS 6XX kit

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    Bob - what is a good time to call tomorrow?Defacto - what makes Swift springs so superior to Eibach?

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Mike@VAC Click here to enlarge
    Defacto - what makes Swift springs so superior to Eibach?
    That he thinks they are.

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    so what i get from this is kw and m3 bits is the best way to go for a street car ? im pretty much done with all hp mods other than turbos when that day comes and i have always thought my car handled like crap even with the sport suspension and replacing the rft with pss.

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    I'm actually looking at koni shocks and my eibach sport springs along with m3 parts....VAC has been extremely helpful. I would suggest anyone to call them up and talk about what they plan to do with thier car. I will keep the drop I have now, maybe slightly lower, and the car will be nimble and give me that balanced feeling I like when I drive the m3(obviously not as good). I could go with kw's but since this is only a street car and I already have eibach springs, the koni setup seems like the best bang for my buck.

    I haven't pulled the trigger yet, but I'm close.
    Click here to enlarge
    ESS 6XX kit

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    Does anyone have any experience with these?

    http://www.horsepowerfreaks.com/part...trol_Pro/11526
    2011 335is DCT, collecting parts....


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    Man you guys got me all mixed up now. I'm definitely getting my suspension upgraded because I can't stand the ride with the stock sport suspension with run flats (i have a '07 coupe). The suspension right now with 40,xxx miles on it reminds me of riding in the back seat of a school bus the way it bounces up and down and then it's way too harsh over sharp bumps at the same time. Anway, I thought I had it narrowed down to either the ground control street/school kit or possibly the Ohlins road & track but now I'm considering the KW street comforts as well but I don't want my car lowered any from the zsp level; it's low enough right now as is. So, can you keep the stock sport ride height or very close to it with the KW's? I was kind of leaning towards the Ohlins but as mentioned earlier, the springs (the rears at least) seem like they would be too soft. I'ts weird to me how most setups come with rear springs roughly double the rate of the front springs but the Ohlins are almost the same front and back. I don't get that and that's about the only thing holding me back from them I guess. I like the ground control too and was kind of leaning that way but somebody brought up the point that you can't use the meagan toe arms with the m3 camber arms they come with (let me know if i misunderstood this). Basically I just want to really tighten up the suspension and get rid of the floaty feeling when hitting an undulation on the highway at high speed and your cars starts to kind of bob up and down like you're in a boat or something. I probably will get all the M3 arms also and can't wait to switch to non run flats....I'd love to hear some more impressions though of the GC kit and the Ohlins as well (I know Alpina likes the Ohlins)...

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