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    • All time ranking of BMW M motors - Best production BMW Motorsport engines list

      The intro you will read below obviously was written before the F80 M3 was on the streets. BimmerBoost revisited this piece and edited it to include the BMW M turbo motors. Despite these engines not being true 'Motorsport' derived engines and not being raced by the division that shares the Motorsport name BimmerBoost is including them in order to have an up to date list.

      That certainly makes it tricky to balance the naturally aspirated M engines with the turbocharged engines. Let's rank the motors and see where the dust settles.


      Previous intro:

      This list will definitely elicit some emotional responses as well as a good amount of debate. With the BMW Motorsport division leaving their spectacular naturally aspirated tradition and the next generation M3 set to have a forced induction motor for the first time in its storied history, this is a good point in time to honor the history of M and acknowledge the great motors they have produced before the last naturally aspirated M motor officially ends production which will happen next year.

      What is the best M motor BMW ever created? Well, below you will find BimmerBoost's ranking which of course is subjective but based on an analysis of BMW M's history, engineering, the aftermarket, and Motorsport prowess as the letter M is supposed to stand for. Let the debate begin...

      1. S38


      Why the S38? If you have to ask then it is a good thing you are not compiling this list. This is the first true M motor, the one that started it all. A buttery smooth inline-6 with individual throttle bodies that set the standard for all that would follow. It is based on the M88 motor which can really be considered the father of all M motors as it was included in the very first M car, the BMW M1.

      If BMW themselves saw fit for this motor design to go into what they specifically titled the first of all that is M, who are we to argue? The M88 was turbocharged for Motorsport use way back in 1979 where it was said to make over 950 horsepower and used in Group 5 racing starting in the 1980 season. 950 horsepower way back in the 80's. If this is not an M engine design that has stood the test of time, what is?

      Now of course with the introduction of the S38 for the E28 M5 the M88 design saw some changes although the bore, stroke, and cylinder head all carried over. A dual-row timing chain, different cam profile, internals with a different compression ratio, and a catalytic converter for emissions reasons were the major changes. Log headers were introduced which was a cost cutting effect of the motor going into a sedan so there was a performance penalty versus the M88/3. The S38 would see duty in the E28 M5 and E34 M5. The motor design was so stout it was seen fit for two generations of M5's undergoing minor evolution for the E34. No other BMW M5 motor can make this claim. This motor also saw double duty in the very first M6.

      The S38 eventually reached 3.8 liters of displacement with the S38B38 fitted to the E34 M5 producing 335 naturally aspirated horses. BMW pushed the S38B38 very far considering it was a street motor as the spacing between cylinders was even more narrow than that of the version used by BMW in Motorsport.

      The S38 remained in production until 1995 when all was said and done. This is the same basic engine design that was used by BMW since 1978. There is no other BMW M motor that can make the claim of its design seeing use in three separate decades. There is no other M motor that more deserves the first place spot. There is no other M motor as storied or with such longevity. There is no other M motor that started it all. This is the first, this is the best, and so it shall always be.


      BMW S38B36
      Horsepower:315
      Torque:266 pound-feet
      Wheel Horsepower: 250
      Wheel Torque: 231
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 93.4 x 86.0
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 7000
      Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: Not applicable


      2. S85


      The S85 V10 should be the best M motor of all time. Unfortunately, it never saw the development and push that the S38 saw. BMW did push it in concept form for the E60 M5 CSL where they increased the stroke and made the motor a 550+ horsepower 5.5 liter unit but tightening emissions regulations and cost cutting put an end to a BMW sedan ever having a high revving naturally aspirated V10 again.

      Just the idea of a naturally aspirated 8250 rpm V10 for a four door car was absurd to begin with. This was a sports car motor in a sedan. That is what makes it so incredible and so very BMW M in its execution. Nobody blended everyday usability with a Motorsport inspired powerlpant better than BMW.

      The only other place you could find an engine resembling it would be in the Lamborghini Gallardo. At a $100k premium mind you and the S85 V10 with its oversquare design actually had more naturally aspirated potential. The Gallardo's 5.0 liter V10 evolved into today's 5.2 liter 8700+ rpm direct injected unit making roughly 600 naturally aspirated horses. It's a shame the S85 will never see similar development over time.

      The only knock on the motor is the aftermarket. S85 V10 tuning is alive and well it is just that the engine took considerably longer to see widespread forced induction than its S65 4.0 liter V8 little brother. Considering the extra liter of displacement, the better oiling system, and more material to work with the S85 V10 should be doing some big things. Only one group has really pushed it:


      It is the most awarded BMW engine in history and the S85 V10 is the best blend of revs and displacement that M ever put into a BMW vehicle. It deserved a longer life than it received.


      Displacement: 5.0 liter
      Horsepower: 507
      Torque: 384 lb-ft
      Wheel Horsepower: 426
      Wheel Torque: 320 lb-ft
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 92.0 x 75.2
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 8250
      Compression Ratio: 12.0:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: 10

      3. S54


      This is the engine that got me hooked on BMW so no doubt there is some bias here. The S54 earns its place among the greats though. It is the best inline-6 motor to ever find its way into a BMW 3-Series. It makes a strong argument for the best BMW inline-6 of all time but the S38 simply has a longer track record, more Motorsport wins, more displacement, and ultimately edges it out based on history. That said, this is the baddest modern BMW six cylinder of all time.

      Why? Seriously, you have to ask? 8000 rpm from an undersquare design. Piston speeds at the time that rivaled those in Formula 1 cars. Over 100 horsepower per liter. An iron block that could take just about anything you could throw at it. Excellent Motorsport results going toe to toe with Porsche who kept increasing displacement to try to stay ahead of it.

      The USA finally got a naturally aspirated M inline-6 motor that was not neutered compared to the rest of the world. The only other place you could get an engine like this was from Porsche in the 996 GT3 which the MKI version was not sold in the USA meaning only BMW offered six-cylinder Motorsport thrills in a car like the E46 M3 that you could drive everyday. Combine the motor with the SMG (sequential manual transmission) and you were in a race car for the road.

      This engine started a love affair with BMW M for many. Today's BMW M motors do match the response partially thanks to the lack of individual throttle bodies, do not have blocks as strong, do not rev as high, and they also have lower compression. You add a little bit of boost to this engine and you can run 9's in the 1/4 mile at over 140 miles per hour. It's just a hell of a motor.

      The only knock on it is that it eventually became a liability in racing. BMW replaced it with a 4.0 liter V8 and went back to kicking ass and taking names. BMW was so dominant with the V8 instead of the I6 that Porsche petitioned successfully to have it banned in ALMS racing. BMW would return of course with the S65 V8 and Porsche could not stop that from happening.

      The S54 also was the first BMW M motor to dominate its International Engine of the Year Award category winning best 3.0 to 4.0 liter motor for six years straight.

      Some people will make the case that the S54 belongs first on this list. They have a point.


      Displacement: 3.2 liter
      Horsepower: 343
      Torque: 269 lb-ft
      Wheel Horsepower: 280
      Wheel Torque: 235
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 87.0 x 91.0
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 8000
      Compression Ratio: 11.5:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: 8

      4. S65


      Ah, the S65. BimmerBoost has a love-hate relationship with this motor. Based on pure efficiency it is pretty much the best of the M bunch short of the S85 which it will always trail due to having one liter less displacement. Essentially that is what the S65 V8 boils down to, an S85 missing two cylinders.

      However, this is when BMW started to get cheap and it spelled the end of the naturally aspirated M engine. BMW built the S65 with racing in mind of course but also because they could share the pistons and rods from the S85 V10. If you look at the bore and stroke, it is the same thing. If you disassemble both engines you can see it is the same damn thing for yourself.

      That starting to get cheap part rears its ugly head in the oiling system. The S85 oiling system is better and some call it a 'quasi-dry sump' setup. Whatever you want to label the S85 does a better job of keeping the motor lubricated than the S65 system. Even in the track special E92 M3 GTS model where BMW took the S65 to 4.4 liters by increasing the stroke they still did not give it a dry sump oiling system and just kept it the same. Cost cutting, once again.

      The Motorsport version of course has a dry sump system and this motor flat out kicked ass in ALMS racing. Back to back championships for BMW who spanked Porsche, Ferrari, Corvette, and anyone else who wanted to compete. There is no other BMW M motor with more modern racing success. The S65 even has Grand-AM and Daytona victories under its belt.

      Such incredible Motorsport success should mean great aftermarket success. However, big power is the S65's weakness. It is very efficient in that it makes more power per psi of boost than even the vaunted S54 (12.0:1 compression and 8400 rpm helps) but it is not as strong of a motor. It is built with naturally aspirated performance in mind for the race track.

      it is lighter than an S54 but that lightweight silicon-aluminum Formula 1 inspired block is not as strong as an iron block. It is so compact that there is not a lot of room between the cylinders. It is designed for great weight distribution and to be mounted as far back as possible whereas an S54 is longer due to its inline design. This makes all the sense in the world for racing which is what a Motorsport engine is supposed to do. Unfortunately, for BMW street cars this means a lot of reinforcement and big cost to handle big boosted power past the 700 wheel horsepower mark.

      BimmerBoost's own (never ending) project M3 saw more torque than any other E9X M3 or S65 V8 in the world. With that torque comes challenges and the S65's weakness is not in making power but in holding together at high power. Where the S54 block is a liability in racing the S65 block is a liability in the aftermarket.

      That said, the S65 V8 is the best naturally aspirated V8 ever produced by BMW M. 8400 rpm, individual throttle bodies, a beautiful torque curve, and smooth power delivery. That it delivers more power and torque in a lighter package than the six cylinder motors that preceded it is a feat in of itself. It certainly earns its spot and its five straight 3.0 to 4.0 liter displacement category International Engine of the Year Awards.


      Displacement: 4.0 liter
      Horsepower: 414
      Torque: 300 lb-ft
      Wheel Horsepower: 350
      Wheel Torque: 254 lb-ft
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 92.0 x 75.2
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 8400
      Compression Ratio: 12.0:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: 5


      5. S63/S63TU


      The first boosted M motor on the list. Why the S63? Because it is a hell of a design and quite an engineering achievement. BMW M innovated with the design. It is based on the N63 V8 but the N63 V8 itself had engineering input from the M engineers who knew it would be a base for future M motors. That is part of the reason it has its innovative top mount turbo placement with the turbochargers sitting in the V.

      The Mercedes turbo engines of the same time period did not share this design. As a matter of fact, one of the most telling reasons that the S63 design is as good as it is happens to be Audi and Mercedes-AMG copying it. You will notice the Audi 4.0 TFSI V8 and the Mercede M178 have some BMW M S63 inspiration in them essentially going to the same manifold and turbo placement. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, right?

      What is special about this design? Well, BimmerBoost covered this in a previous article on the motor:

      Quote Originally Posted by BimmerBoost
      What are they?

      The BMW N63 and S63 are both twin turbo and direct injected V8's. They are different from traditional turbo V8's in the sense that the intake and exhaust systems are reversed. By designing the intake and exhaust this way BMW is able to put the turbos in the V, or valley, of the motor on top instead of the traditional location which would have turbos at the bottom off the exhaust manifold. The advantage is that the exhaust gas leaves the head traveling a very short distance to reach the turbo. BMW engineers have often prided themselves on the response of their motors and with this type of design even when going to turbo motors they are able to provide very little lag and strong response from low RPM. Not to mention, top mount turbos are just flat out cool.

      How are they different?

      The S63 is based on the N63 but there are some very significant differences between the two motors. The main difference being that the S63 uses a pulse tuned, cross engine exhaust manifold. That sounds cool, but what does it mean? It means that each turbo gets its exhaust flow from 4 exhaust pulses but also from opposite cylinder banks. This exhaust gas is fed into twin-scroll turbos which means there are two passages for the exhaust gases in the turbos. The N63 on the other hand uses single scroll turbos which means one passage for the exhaust gases. It is this pulse tuned exhaust manifold as well as the twin-scroll turbos that is major difference in the architecture of the S63 vs. the N63.




      BMW released the graphics above to illustrate what is taking place. By using this manifold with the twin scroll setup BMW is able to keep constant exhaust pulses flowing to the turbos at every 180 degree rotation. The N63 on the hand will have uneven exhaust pulses as it is fed by only one bank of cylinders instead of a cross-engine setup. This is a significant difference that shows BMW innovation in turbo development.
      This is impressive work by BMW. It is not just any old V8 with turbos tacked on as an afterthought. However, in the opinion of BimmerBoost these motors are not as good as their naturally aspirated M counterparts.

      Why? Because BMW can be lazier in the tuning. They can change the software for huge gains rather than have to redesign the hardware or make it more efficient. The motors go in extremely heavy vehicles that need a ton of torque down low to move them. Do you remember naturally aspirated M SUV's? You shouldn't because they do not exist. BMW tuned these engines for huge torque and it shows in their power curves.

      They do not rev high in the traditional sense and the torque drops off quickly. That is not a traditional M trait. They also are not exactly responsive. Turbo lag exists and individual throttle bodies do not. These engine are about raw power more than throttle response and finesse. Not to mention, where is the racing pedigree? BMW is not racing an X5M and if you tried you would go into limp mode right away. Just as the M5 and M6 do when they attempt repeated laps with their bloated 4300+ pound bodies. Twin turbo engines generate a lot of heat on the track and naturally aspirated motors are better in this respect for repeated lapping.

      While a great design the S63 marks the precise moment when BMW became more about muscle than finesse. Some people may like that but BimmerBoost does not as it does not represent what M is supposed to be about.

      F10 M5 Dyno:


      Displacement: 4.4 liter
      Horsepower: 547/575
      Torque: 500/550 lb-ft
      Wheel Horsepower: 527
      Wheel Torque: 476 lb-ft
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 89.0 x 88.3
      Fuel Injection: Direct
      Redline RPM: 7000/7200
      Compression Ratio: 9.3:1/10.0:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: 0



      6. S50B32 / S52


      This is a tricky one and no doubt E36 fanboys will complain about the placement here. They would have an argument if the S50B32 made it to the USA instead of a tweaked M50/M52 powerplant. While the US E36 M3 did have a BMW M engine as denoted by the 'S' prefix it was not the real thing. The real thing was the higher revving S50B32 sold in Europe that made 316 horsepower.

      The US S52 engine is just a reworked M52. Output of 240 horsepower is good but a far cry from what the real M motor was making overseas. Due to BMW M not giving us the real thing the engine is moved down the list.

      Its aftermarket potential with the iron block is great and the entire BMW M50 engine family deserves recognition. The S54 is really the ultimate evolution of these motors but as it is the ultimate evolution BimmerBoost places it higher on the list.

      Some US M fans still do not forgive BMW for the S52. This one doesn't.

      S52:


      Displacement: 3.2 liter
      Horsepower: 240
      Torque: 240
      Wheel Horsepower: 226
      Wheel Torque: 227 lb-ft
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 86.4 x 89.6
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 6500
      Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: 0



      8. S14


      It is tough putting the S14 all the way down here but unfortunately time has caught up to it. Part of what hurts it is that it is a small motor and horsepower has moved to levels nobody could have foreseen. Not to mention that BMW moved on from it in racing.

      That does not make the S14 bad by any means. It could even be thought of as the Honda F20 (S2000 engine) of its time except with the addition of DTM racing dominance under its belt. For its time the S14 was unrivaled. Nobody made a better four-cylinder engine in the world.

      Built racing examples made well over 300 horsepower. Incredible when you take into account the engine starts at only 2.0 liters of displacement. Final iterations such as the S14B25 displaced 2.5 liters and made a very respectable 217 horsepower in the street legal E30 M3.

      The S14 ended up being retired for BMW I6's which of course have a much more storied history but for its period in racing nobody could match the S14. It is the true definition of a BMW M engine.


      S14B23

      Displacement: 2.3 liter
      Horsepower: 189
      Torque: 155 lb-ft
      Wheel Horsepower: 157
      Wheel Torque: 158 lb-ft
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 93.4 x 84.0
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 7300
      Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: Not Applicable

      9. S55


      Some people are enamored with the BMW S55 because of the stock power it makes. Yes, BMW underrated the motor significantly and it makes far more power than the 425 horsepower rating implies. It makes 427 to the wheels stock. That means this is a motor at 500+ horsepower not 425.

      That is cool and all but making big power with a turbocharged inline-6 is not that big of a deal. Squeezing out naturally aspirated horses takes far more skill than just throwing boost at something. To BMW's credit, they did not just take an N55 and up the boost. The S55 motor sees some significant changes.

      The block is a closed deck example and they rev the motor out to 7500 rpm. Nice, but so what? The S54 revs to 8000 rpm. It has an even stronger iron block which is better if chasing power is your thing. It also has more displacement. Everything the S55 does the S54 already does better. Not to mention it has higher volumetric efficiency thanks to its naturally aspirated design base. Plus just look at its torque curve in comparison.

      The S55 is hardly BMW's most impressive M motor or inline-6. Take the turbos off it and it's nothing special at all. Take the turbos off an S54 or S50 and you still have a gem as they were gems from the moment they were designed without needing turbos to be relevant.

      Combine all of this with absolutely no Motorsport prowess, limp mode issues on the track, and you have an M3 motor that really is not what an M3 motor is supposed to be. Unless you think the M3 is a dragster now. Some of you probably do think that.


      Horsepower: 425
      Torque: 406 lb-ft
      Wheel horsepower: 427
      Wheel torque: 429
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 84.0 x 89.6
      Fuel Injection: Direct
      Redline RPM: 7500
      Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: 1


      9. S62


      The S62 is a good motor, no doubt about it. I remember reading an article from one of the major magazines that said, 'Only Enzo's heirs make a sweeter V8.' The S62 V8 in the E39 M5 indeed is that good but it is not BMW M's best work.

      The S65 V8 with a liter less displacement makes more power at the wheels. The S85 V10 with the same amount of displacement makes nearly a 100 more wheel horsepower. The S62 is not the most efficient design.

      This is partially due to it basically being a larger and higher revving M62 V8. BMW bored it out a bit, increased the stroke a bit, revved it out a bit, and gave it individual throttle bodies. That is certainly good stuff but it is not quite the same as designing an M motor from the ground up like the S85 and the S85 definitely shows its superiority.

      Not every M engine needs to be a ground up design but the S62 is simply a good M Motor and a good V8, not necessarily a great one. At its time it still outpaced its competition as even the larger 5.5 liter M113 V8 in the W210 Mercedes E55 AMG could not match it. BMW had the muscle, the revs, the response, the power, the torque, you name it.

      The aftermarket performance has not been stellar as supercharged S65's easily outpace supercharged S62's. In the context of other M motors of similar displacement or cylinder count it just is not as good of a design.

      We remember it with nostalgia as we do the S14. Time just has not been as kind to the S62 as it has other BMW M motors.


      Horsepower: 394
      Torque: 369 lb-ft
      Wheel horsepower: 326
      Wheel torque: 327 lb-ft
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 94.0 x 89.0
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 7000
      Compression Ratio: 11.0:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: 0



      10. S70B56


      The forgotten M V12 and the lowest production M engine of all time. This was an M motor but one that never was fitted to an M car. It saw duty in the E31 850csi model.

      The horsepower and torque figures are respectable at 380 and 410 lb-ft respectively. Not exactly a powerhouse and not exactly a revver either. It was a better M70 V12 but still a lazy motor designed for cruising.

      If this was the BMW S70/2 engine, it would be at the top of the list. It isn't though. That engine was fitted to the McLaren F1 and never saw duty in a BMW vehicle which is what the motors on this list are about. That BMW S70/2 engine also won BMW a Le Mans title.

      It showed what M could really do with the V12 design pushing it to high revs and over 100 horsepower per liter. The S70/2 is a marvel. The S70 is forgotten and for good reason. It was not a memorable powerplant.


      Horsepower: 380
      Torque: 410 lb-ft
      Wheel horsepower: 301
      Wheel torque: 331 lb-ft
      Bore x Stroke (mm): 86.0 x 80.0
      Fuel Injection: Port
      Redline RPM: 6400
      Compression Ratio: 9.8:1
      International Engine of the Year Awards: Not Applicable


      All of the engines on this list are good. Yes, some are better than the others. Some of them are great. Yes, the naturally aspirated motors are gone and turbocharged engines now take their place.

      Looking over the numbers and curves M fans have to feel some sense of nostalgia. We will not see super high revving razor sharp engines ever again from BMW M. That hurts as the fans and even those at M are forgetting what the BMW Motorsport division is supposed to be about.

      BimmerBoost is not without fault as many of the readers of this forum network are wrapped up in dyno figures as measures of greatness instead of the whole package. The M motor was the heart of the driving experience due to offering a Motorsport feel in a street car with all around daily usability.

      Now, BMW engines are boosted just like everyone else's and it is a game of who wants to push the most boost and fit the biggest turbos. Not exactly as exciting as BMW creating a high revving V10 with an engine block built in their Formula 1 factory. Then sticking that motor in a sedan and telling their competition they do not need superchargers or larger motors to compete as they already build the best engines in the world.

      That is who BMW used to be. The company that took no shortcuts and showed off their skill with incredible motors those competing in their class could not match in anything other than raw output. A pity but at least performance cars are still alive and well. Unfortunately these days at BMW the driver's car is slowly being phased out. Let's hope we do not ever have to write about when BMW's used to be driven by enthusiasts.

      This article was originally published in forum thread: All time ranking of BMW M engines - Best production BMW Motorsport motors list started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 23 Comments
      1. onurleft's Avatar
        onurleft -
        Haha I reckon that dyno sheet is my S52!
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by onurleft Click here to enlarge
        Haha I reckon that dyno sheet is my S52!
        No idea.
      1. Nugs's Avatar
        Nugs -
        Is this just M motors that came to the US?
        Why would you put in the US S50 instead of the rest of the world version?

        I just picked up a 1994 M3 with the S50b30.
        Stock with 200,000kms and still pulls great.

        Click here to enlarge
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Nugs Click here to enlarge
        Is this just M motors that came to the US?
        Why would you put in the US S50 instead of the rest of the world version?

        I just picked up a 1994 M3 with the S50b30.
        Stock with 200,000kms and still pulls great.

        http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im..._zpsziuf-1.jpg
        It is biased toward the US, yes. It is mentioned in the description that due to this the S52 the motor is penalized. Also that some enthusiasts do not forgive them for it.

        If it was an S50B30 or S50B32 that the US got obviously it would be much higher on the list. You do not know the pain of getting overlooked for that engine considering it is one of the all time best.

        It would still be behind the S54 though which took things further.
      1. Itsbrokeagain's Avatar
        Itsbrokeagain -
        IMO I would have put the S62 above the S65, as it saw some good use in actual racing (Turner Motorsports E92 in IMSA for example) and ran the 24hrs more than once. Same as the S14.

        I'm not sure if the S65 ever saw a big undertaking like that aside from a few private owner cars? I know Turner had issues trying to keep that motor alive in sustained running..
      1. richpike's Avatar
        richpike -
        Good read.

        -Rich
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by richpike Click here to enlarge
        Good read.

        -Rich
        I'm surprised more people aren't into this one. It's a good one.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Itsbrokeagain Click here to enlarge
        IMO I would have put the S62 above the S65, as it saw some good use in actual racing (Turner Motorsports E92 in IMSA for example) and ran the 24hrs more than once.
        http://www.bimmerboost.com/content.p...t-at-Brickyard
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Itsbrokeagain Click here to enlarge
        I'm not sure if the S65 ever saw a big undertaking like that aside from a few private owner cars? I know Turner had issues trying to keep that motor alive in sustained running..
        The S65 won its Daytona debut unlike the S62 and ended up replacing the S62.

        That doesn't include the ALMS victories and titles.

        The S62 belongs exactly where it is and far below the S65 both in racing and street applications.
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        Good article Sticky.

        One awesome thing about old M days is the sheer of talent they had back in the day. Take the S14 for example. It's based off the M10 so it should be called S10, but they didn't call it S10. Instead they named S14 which is after the time frame they had to deal with (14 weeks) to make the engine.
        @Sticky i think a great condidate for a depth-throw article would be focusing on recently passed Paul Rosche. He totally changed BMW and it's engines.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        Good article Sticky.


        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        It's based off the M10 so it should be called S10, but they didn't call it S10. Instead they named S14 which is after the time frame they had to deal with (14 weeks) to make the engine.
        This isn't entirely accurate but it's way too late and I'm way too drunk to refute it.
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtMv6V7ZvmE



        This isn't entirely accurate but it's way too late and I'm way too drunk to refute it.
        I challenge you to correct me RIGHT NOW lol
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        I challenge you to correct me RIGHT NOW lol
        Fine. Saying it is a souped M10 is not accurate. The oil passage drainback is different and essentially it is a mashup of an M10 block and S38 head.
      1. justa335i's Avatar
        justa335i -
        Waiting for someone with a N54 to start crying lol
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Fine. Saying it is a souped M10 is not accurate. The oil passage drainback is different and essentially it is a mashup of an M10 block and S38 head.
        Click here to enlarge
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        @Sticky i think a great condidate for a depth-throw article would be focusing on recently passed Paul Rosche. He totally changed BMW and it's engines.
        I might do this. I just don't think many people would care.

        An article about a new M2 paint color somehow would get more attention. It's weird trying to write quality articles these days.
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        For class project i need to present someone in Automotive industry anyways so im gonna do it and share it here. I guess he is a solid choice, any suggestions?
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        For class project i need to present someone in Automotive industry anyways so im gonna do it and share it here. I guess he is a solid choice, any suggestions?
        Past or present? Ferdinand Piech is a good choice.
      1. 93siro's Avatar
        93siro -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Past or present? Ferdinand Piech is a good choice.
        Doesn't matter. Someone more like an underdog that most guys don't know about. Piech is too high profile.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by 93siro Click here to enlarge
        Doesn't matter. Someone more like an underdog that most guys don't know about. Piech is too high profile.
        Oh. Then me.