• Vargas Stage III Turbo upgrade for 335/135 N54 motor hits 572 wheel horsepower on 91 octane pump gas (no meth injection) with Cobb flash

      Well here are some results for the Vargas Stage III upgrade that has caused the N54 forum section to basically be engaged in chaos for the past few months. From accusations of vaporware, to comparison to single turbo upgrades, to countless other arguments the day has come and the Stage III Vargas Turbo upgrade dyno'd on 91 octane with no meth 572 horsepower to the rear wheels. This is with a Cobb flash tuned by BimmerBoost vendor Pro-Tuning Freaks.


      Impressive? Yep, sure is and this seems to also be a 91 octane pump gas only world record for the N54. Now keep in mind this is just the beginning. What will it do with meth? What will do on E85? What will it do with race gas and big boost? What about different turbos? Sky appears to be the limit but for now this kind of performance on pump gas sure is a big boost (hah, get it?) to the N54 scene.

      Congratulations to all involved, Vargas Turbo Tech, Pro-Tuning Freaks, Cobb, and just the N54 community as well. The impossible just became possible. Pictures, video, and dynograph below.



      This article was originally published in forum thread: 572WHP 537WTQ - ACN 91 Octane, no meth - VTT Stage 3 Early Dynos PTF / COBB Protune started by VargasTurboTech View original post
      Comments 575 Comments
      1. vasillalov's Avatar
        vasillalov -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sered Click here to enlarge
        We can hope that the new M3/M4 cars have one compatible with the N54, because it will undoubtedly be beefed up. Or unless someone figures out how to rig up two HPFPs running en-tandem.

        BINGO! I am also hopeful that other components from the M3/M4 will be swappable as well: LPFP and injectors.
      1. Turkeybaster115's Avatar
        Turkeybaster115 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by vasillalov Click here to enlarge
        Where have you been in the bast 3 years? BMW issued several different versions of the HPFP which was failing in earlier models. The latest HPFP version, coupled with software and injector recalls cures the major fiasco BMW had on their hands. This was resolved in 2010. All new N54 motors that come out of the factory will have the latest part numbers. This is how recalls work, whether its for an airbag or fuel pump.

        Your posts suggest that there is a difference in output and performance in the 1M fuel pump, when in fact there is none. ALL fuel pumps are the same. If your car does not have the latest pump, it is because you did not receive a recall letter from your BMW dealer to get it replaced.
        Guy, the recalls weren't sent out in the mail. BMW doesn't do things like that. I got my HPFP changed, with the SAME OLD part number mind you, only after I failed emissions testing at well over 50K miles. If you haven't failed an emissions test, and just go to a dealership, even with problem codes, they typically won't just sit there and start applying recalls to your car. At 100K+ I'm still on original turbos. These suckers have a waste gate rattle recall on them, up to 80K miles. Even with waste gate rattle the dealership refused to do the change.

        It truly is best for you to quite quoting me. I don't want to have anything to do with you.
      1. vasillalov's Avatar
        vasillalov -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Turkeybaster115 Click here to enlarge
        Guy, the recalls weren't sent out in the mail. BMW doesn't do things like that..

        Yes they were. I got one in the mail and so have many others! As a matter of fact I get regular communication in the mail from BMWNA related to my car. You did not get yours because you did not call BMWNA and did not have them update the mailing address associated with the VIN of your car. This also means that you won't get future recall letters.

        By LAW all car makers are required to send letters to all owners if there is a recall on a critical component of the vehicle that can jeopardize passenger safety.

        Get your ducks in a row mate.
      1. Turkeybaster115's Avatar
        Turkeybaster115 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sered Click here to enlarge
        No, you won't. You might find a 335i that hasn't had a HPFP recall yet, but BMW has gone through quite a few model #s on the HPFP part. This is why you're seeing different part numbers. There is no other HPFP out there right now for this platform. End of discussion.
        Yes, so which part number does he have? What are the differences in part numbers? was the equipment redesigned? Even if nothing has changed, how old is the OP's fuel pump? An LPFP, or HPFP, at say 50-80K miles is VERY different from a brand new one.
      1. Turkeybaster115's Avatar
        Turkeybaster115 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by vasillalov Click here to enlarge
        EXACTLY my thoughts. Turkeybaster somehow thinks he can easily ditch the O2 sensors and run open loop all the time. Idiotic idea at best.
        It's called O2 sims. Ditching would mean, leave em in there to get fouled up by the lead.
      1. Sered's Avatar
        Sered -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Turkeybaster115 Click here to enlarge
        Guy, the recalls weren't sent out in the mail. BMW doesn't do things like that.

        Full stop. No one said that. At all. And it's completely besides the point, quit deflecting.

        Over the span of existence of the N54 platform, BMW has had to deal with warranty repair issues. (I know right? Dealers repairing cars? Pffft). So in their system, they find over time that certain parts suck and attempt to find another manufacturer or maybe press the manufacturer to upgrade/fix the commonly failing part. Well guess what? BMW, like most manufacturers, CHANGES THE PART NUMBER WHEN RECEIVING A NEW PART IN INVENTORY. They do this in order to distinguish between parts in order to not get them confused. Sounds like a smart idea that would save them money considering they're already having to pay their mechanics for the install and the manufacturer for this part. So they update them, and put things like 'ENDED' on the part to notify a service center that the part is no longer used.

        It is already well-known that the current HPFP model has a fuel flow problem at a certain power level (which is one reason why Shiv was reduced to using a LOT of meth to put up the numbers he did). While they MIGHT get slightly better flow out of the newest model (assuming they don't have it already), Vargas/DZenno have to tune this setup for the median N54 platform user; there will be glory-runs later, and most of us doubt a HPFP update (again assuming they don't have the newest model) will do much as the physical dimensions (inlet diameter, pump design) are either identical or very similar.
      1. Sered's Avatar
        Sered -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Turkeybaster115 Click here to enlarge
        It's called O2 sims. Ditching would mean, leave em in there to get fouled up by the lead.
        Sure thing. Point out where we can find a O2 sim for a 5/6-wire O2 sensor; oh and lemme know how well that works out with the DME (considering something as simple as putting both O2 sensors on a single downpipe causes it to go bonkers).
      1. carcars's Avatar
        carcars -
        Click here to enlargeClick here to enlargeClick here to enlarge...Click here to enlarge
      1. Irishace's Avatar
        Irishace -
        Wow, excellent work!
      1. trufus's Avatar
        trufus -
        That is some sick power on 91. The power band is nuts too... Keep it up guys, can't wait to see more
      1. VargasTurboTech's Avatar
        VargasTurboTech -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by vasillalov Click here to enlarge
        Congratulations to everyone who worked on this project! Impressive!

        @VargasTurboTech : What is your projected production capacity for Stage 2 turbos? The biggest turn-off for me to get RBs is the super long waiting list.
        This first batch is 25 sets. We have pre-sold almost all of them, but just waiting for the beta numbers / make sure everything goes trouble free before I ship the rest. The betas are there for this reason. To test the turbos and make sure everything goes smooth. As soon as I get the green light I can start shipping the rest. I think I have a one or two sets unsold if you want to grab one of those just email me.
      1. funkmobster's Avatar
        funkmobster -
        I see they advertise the new Alpina B3 biturbo (F30) with a upgraded "performance" fuel pump.

        Maybe they found a solution and adapted it to the new model. I believe they use a N55 engine with N54 twin turbo's.

        Somebody know more about this pump?
      1. VargasTurboTech's Avatar
        VargasTurboTech -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Terry@BMS Click here to enlarge
        If low pressure is really going up to 80-90psi then he is overrunning the regulator with his pumps which should also be corrected. I'm not sure how the DME reacts to seeing higher than target low pressure like that. It might lower the pump PWM. Keep an eye on it. Ideally you'd want to bias the low pressure signal back to the dme to keep it observing around 72psi. If 90psi isn't enough try 100psi, etc. His parallel fuel pumps can probably support it. A higher low pressure should allow the high pressure pump to increase flow. Remember a wider line won't do anything. If you had a volume problem, low fuel pressure would drop. It's read at the high pressure pump inlet. But while he is rigging up a new regulator there are a few bits of 1/4" line in tank that should be replaced for 5/16" line.
        I made mention of this a while back that it overruns the regulator, but it only does so as the voltage increases with RPM as the alternator gets spun up. Which is pretty much what I was hoping for. There are pick up problems using both pumps when levels get really low, the company I sent the tank and bucket too are still on the ball making the dual pump drop in to solve all this. I can tell you exactly how the DME reacts to it. It stores a fuel pump code in the system but thats it. Never trips a light while driving, etc. It will tell you when you shut your car off to check your fuel pump, but its a courtesy reminder as it assumes the pump is going out.
      1. Eleventeen's Avatar
        Eleventeen -
        That is simply impressive, add to that the fact it was done on 91 octane... awesome!
      1. rader1's Avatar
        rader1 -
        Now that the pisswasser is out the way... GET SOME 93 IN THE TANK AND GET THE METH FLOWING Click here to enlarge
      1. VargasTurboTech's Avatar
        VargasTurboTech -
        As far as the Xi questions. The way we routed our downpipes, one on top and one on the bottom, we think it might work on the XI as is. But if not its just a matter of designing new DP's for the XI no biggy. You guys will not be left out of the production run. If DP's need to be changed this will be done during production and we will offer 2 kits a RWD and an AWD version.
      1. bobS's Avatar
        bobS -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by benzy89 Click here to enlarge
        391 / 435 sounds slightly below what an FBO 91 + Meth car should be putting down (prob a nice ~25 WHP deduction), so the dyno is probably on target while being just a little conservative (which I'd rather have then promising HP that isn't actually there).

        The WOT tuning sounds like it's going flawless since not a single CEL or fault code was thrown. Def cannot wait to see some drivability videos that show when the boost comes on & how quickly the power can ramp up when you put your foot down Click here to enlarge


        NOW if I only had an MT N54 that could put up with these numbers Click here to enlarge
        Buy mine, it already has a quaiffe LSD, helix FMIC, and only 55k miles...should be sold very soon as I have a serious buyer looking at it next weekend...my car is perfect for someone looking to build a sick n54Click here to enlarge
      1. amclint's Avatar
        amclint -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by VargasTurboTech Click here to enlarge
        As far as the Xi questions. The way we routed our downpipes, one on top and one on the bottom, we think it might work on the XI as is. But if not its just a matter of designing new DP's for the XI no biggy. You guys will not be left out of the production run. If DP's need to be changed this will be done during production and we will offer 2 kits a RWD and an AWD version.
        Excellent Click here to enlarge
      1. Animal29's Avatar
        Animal29 -
        VTT & PTF ftmfw!!
      1. Terry@BMS's Avatar
        Terry@BMS -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by VargasTurboTech Click here to enlarge
        I made mention of this a while back that it overruns the regulator, but it only does so as the voltage increases with RPM as the alternator gets spun up. Which is pretty much what I was hoping for. There are pick up problems using both pumps when levels get really low, the company I sent the tank and bucket too are still on the ball making the dual pump drop in to solve all this. I can tell you exactly how the DME reacts to it. It stores a fuel pump code in the system but thats it. Never trips a light while driving, etc. It will tell you when you shut your car off to check your fuel pump, but its a courtesy reminder as it assumes the pump is going out.
        The fuel pump controller uses a variable PWM signal to control pump output in an attempt to keep low pressure around 72psi. So one side effect to the DME seeing say 90psi might be it reduces PWM which is the opposite of what we'd want it to do. You can monitor voltage at the pumps to see exactly what effect it's having. Having your low pressure so high is probably boosting your fueling capacity over what we normally see at only 72psi. And we're hoping going to say 100-120psi will result in even more potential for the high pressure pump. Ideally though, we'd keep it around 72psi and have a ported high pressure pump in place.

        On the bucket, fuel that leaves the bucket *should* only be able to travel either A) in to a cylinder or B) back in to the bucket. So the only way to exhaust the bucket should be if you're making so much power the fuel is going in to the engine faster than the bucket can fill itself through the siphon valve. You could rig up a camera with the tank open on the dyno to video what is happening in the bucket when the fuel levels are low and from that we can figure out what the issue is and how best to correct it.