• DCT Build Part XII - Build complete, pictures of final assembly, transmission cooler, and Viton seals

      Well, this has been a rather lengthy road to completion but the transmission is basically complete. The car was dropped off by SSP last month to Gintani who should have the motor in by the end of this week. The problem is SSP mounted their trans cooler in the location the heat exchanger for the supercharger needs to go so SSP will need to come to Gintani's facility to re-run their lines as the cooler will need to go in a different location. What took so long for this update? Well, we have been waiting, and waiting, and waiting for SSP to send us details on the Viton seals that required 3 redesigns but never received the information on why these seals are superior to the stock units.

      So, I decided to do my own research and here is what I came up with. These are the stock BMW seals used in the DCT. What is wrong with them exactly? We do not know other than they apparently are not up to the task:










      Here are the Viton seals which delayed the project by 3 months. Viton is a synthetic rubber used for seals, O-rings, things of that sort. Viton was likely used as it is less susceptible to decay and already used in BMW applications such as in VANOS. Viton has much higher temperature and chemical resistance characteristics than the stock seals. Here is what they look like:










      This is the DCT cooler that was mounted by SSP up front. This needs to be moved somewhere else as the supercharger heat exchanger will need to go there. This means SSP will need to come out and run their lines again checking all their fluids and so forth before tuning can take place:














      This is the final assembly. So, the transmission is built but it took about a year longer than estimated. I believe I was as patient as possible and hopefully this will all be wrapped up in December with a built motor, built transmission, a YSI, and a ton of horsepower.





































      This article was originally published in forum thread: M3 DCT Build Journal - World's First BMW DCT Build started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 2372 Comments
      1. Jimefam's Avatar
        Jimefam -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by MrClean335i Click here to enlarge
        Aren't build threads suppose to have updates of the build? This build thread sucks.
        Not to bright huh? He just updated the build thread yesterday when he said they picked the wrong sleeve for the block and $#@!ed up the motor and have/are rebuilding it.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by oldgixxer Click here to enlarge
        Sticky how much HP can a bone stock block handle?
        I'd say ~700
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Jimefam Click here to enlarge
        Lol a little butthurt aren't you, think of it this way now you know what deck height is a can properly use it in a sentence.
        You're kind of just being a tool in this thread instead of discussing the topic. As if you're educating me on a motor you know nothing about. Anyway, since you're not contributing anything of value to my thread I'm removing you from it.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by JRCART Click here to enlarge
        [video]http://www.vacmotorsports.com/blog/are-cylinder-sleeves-bad-for-your-bmw-engine/[/url]

        Holy $#@!, look at these pics, there is really no space between cylinders on these blocks. Sticky you were not kidding.
        I know, BMW kept it super compact to try to sit it as far back as they could. It makes sleeving not such a simple exercise.

        If the motor was iron it wouldn't be a big deal but the alusil is honestly not very tough and way too flexible.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by funkmobster Click here to enlarge
        So it seems they are testing the high boost version since 2008. Its 2013 for christ's sake and they still haven't figured this out??
        Would you please tell me who has?

        Everyone focuses on me as I'm in the spotlight so to speak, that's fine. But have you forgotten there is a stroker M3 that ESS boosted (and blew the motor) that has been down longer than mine and still isn't running? Nobody knows why? I do.

        It isn't just me guys, the S65 isn't the boost platform the S54 is. We all were wrong about it and it looked better on paper than in practice. The design can support big power as you see what mild boost does but it's a problem when going to the next level. If the weaknesses are addressed, it will be a beast, just watch guys.

        Instead of constant criticism try to appreciate the build and journey. It's not a small monetary sacrifice or a small time sacrifice for that matter so the community should not be so divisive but should instead pool together. It will be fun once it's done and a testament to a shop's ability as well as what an M3 can do. These are good things, not bad.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        @JRCART here loook at this:

        Click here to enlarge
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by MrClean335i Click here to enlarge
        Aren't build threads suppose to have updates of the build? This build thread sucks.
        There are over 12 highly detailed updates about the DCT BUILD WHICH IS THE TOPIC AND WAS COMPLETED. What sucks is your reading comprehension and if you don't like it don't read it.
      1. bdtsulev's Avatar
        bdtsulev -
        Sticky, I don't know if this has been asked yet, but are you using longer sleeves so that you can use longer rods and therefore change the rod/stroke ratio and put less stress on the internals at high rpms?
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bdtsulev Click here to enlarge
        Sticky, I don't know if this has been asked yet, but are you using longer sleeves so that you can use longer rods and therefore change the rod/stroke ratio and put less stress on the internals at high rpms?
        You're onto something sir.
      1. bdtsulev's Avatar
        bdtsulev -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        You're onto something sir.
        I would think the better rod angle would help prevent pushing the piston into the cylinder wall, thus flexing the block less and causing less piston wear like you were seeing. Am I getting warmer?
      1. JRCART's Avatar
        JRCART -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        You're onto something sir.
        Isnt that called a stroker??? Increasing rod and piston stroke is called a stroker, at least east of the Mississippi it is.


        This thread officially blows....way too much secrecy.
      1. MisterEm's Avatar
        MisterEm -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        It must be getting close Sticky. This is the most specific information you have shared on the car in an excruciating amount of time. How much time on that motor by the way. Some nice scoring for sure. How much material was gone?
      1. bdtsulev's Avatar
        bdtsulev -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by JRCART Click here to enlarge
        Isnt that called a stroker??? Increasing rod and piston stroke is called a stroker, at least east of the Mississippi it is.
        What I believe he is doing is using longer rods only. If he doesn't change the crankshaft then longer rods would move the piston travel up farther, but wouldn't actually change the stroke, just where the piston sits and the rod angle. This would explain the use of longer sleeves. Also, I'm pretty postive a stroker would use shorter rods
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by MisterEm Click here to enlarge
        It must be getting close Sticky. This is the most specific information you have shared on the car in an excruciating amount of time. How much time on that motor by the way. Some nice scoring for sure. How much material was gone?
        Not my block just showing the bore spacing/material.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bdtsulev Click here to enlarge
        What I believe he is doing is using longer rods only. If he doesn't change the crankshaft then longer rods would move the piston travel up farther, but wouldn't actually change the stroke, just where the piston sits and the rod angle. This would explain the use of longer sleeves. Also, I'm pretty postive a stroker would use shorter rods
        Exactly correct.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by JRCART Click here to enlarge
        Isnt that called a stroker??? Increasing rod and piston stroke is called a stroker, at least east of the Mississippi it is.


        This thread officially blows....way too much secrecy.
        Don't you understand why a tuner wouldn't want to share too much at this stage? It's a rather large investment.
      1. JRCART's Avatar
        JRCART -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bdtsulev Click here to enlarge
        What I believe he is doing is using longer rods only. If he doesn't change the crankshaft then longer rods would move the piston travel up farther, but wouldn't actually change the stroke, just where the piston sits and the rod angle. This would explain the use of longer sleeves. Also, I'm pretty postive a stroker would use shorter rods
        .....if what you are thinking is the case then wouldnt that decrease the stroke and theoretically decrease engine displacement? what about piston clearance on the top?
      1. bdtsulev's Avatar
        bdtsulev -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by JRCART Click here to enlarge
        .....if what you are thinking is the case then wouldnt that decrease the stroke and theoretically decrease engine displacement?
        If he uses taller sleeves and increases the deck height then it would keep the displacemen the same as stock. Without raising the deck height the piston would actually go through the head.
      1. JRCART's Avatar
        JRCART -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by bdtsulev Click here to enlarge
        If he uses taller sleeves and increases the deck height then it would keep the displacemen the same as stock. Without raising the deck height the piston would actually go through the head.
        I assume addressing deck height means scabbing onto the factory head? Not really the smartest thing to do for heat disapation and cooling, especially on a FI motor. .
      1. bdtsulev's Avatar
        bdtsulev -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by JRCART Click here to enlarge
        I assume addressing deck height means scabbing onto the factory head? Not really the smartest thing to do for heat disapation and cooling, especially on a FI motor. .
        I would think you could essentially use an iron spacer in between the block and head to raise the deck height. Or perhaps the flanges on the sleaves themselves, if widened over the top of the block could be used as the spacer. I think that would also help keep the block from flexing. I guess we will find out soon enough what exactly was done.