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    • Horsepower Freaks Right Hand Drive (RHD) E46 M3 (S54) Stage I twin turbo kit officially released - $18,500





      The HPF Stage 1 Twin Turbo systems provide the "ULTIMATE" powerband for your BMW M3 (RHD) making it a brutal daily driver and track monster with full boost hitting before you can press the gas pedal to the floor. Enjoy the amazingly quick spool of twin GT22 turbos in your M3 that come on-line in just a fraction of a second. No more waiting until red-line for full boost as you do with many supercharger systems. All this power is produced while still retaining all the factory controls and air-conditioning and works on both SMG and non-SMG equiped vehicles.

      All of the technology we developed and employed over the past 5 years with our Left Hand Drive turbo systems is packed directly into this amazingly streetable twin turbo system available for Right Hand Drive E46 M3s. A vast majority of the parts in our RHD turbo system have passed the 2 million mile test in our customer's vehicles both on and off the track. No tuning is required, however our twin turbo system comes with an "unlocked" engine management system for the end user to datalog, add nitrous, E85, and any other systems they desire. Simply download the AEM sortware from http://forum.aempower.com/forum/inde...c,26751.0.html and plug your laptop into the HPF EMS and you are tuning with all the same capabilities the AEM system has to offer.

      For Details please visit
      http://www.horsepowerfreaks.com/part...s/E46_M3/11037












      This article was originally published in forum thread: HPF Right Hand Drive (RHD) TWIN TURBO SYSTEM RELEASE!!! started by HPFBranden View original post
      Comments 52 Comments
      1. Riotch671's Avatar
        Riotch671 -
        Sick!
      1. PEI330Ci's Avatar
        PEI330Ci -
        I posted this on another forum, thought it would interesting info to add here as well:

        "The turbos aren't too small, they just don't fit this engine properly from a flow perspective.


        The exhaust housing is not a big restriction, there's still more left in it before it chokes. Corrected mass flow choke point is about 15 lb/min @ a PR of 1.8, which I'm guessing is pretty close to what these turbos are running at on pump fuel. That's 300hp worth of exhaust flow per turbo...which they aren't doing yet. So in this case, we are not "turbine" limited.


        Looking at the compressor housing, it can flow a bit more than what is being used, but you need a higher pressure ratio to tap into that.


        The issue here is that the compressor STARTs in the middle of it's efficiency range at 4000 RPM which is 76% adiabatic, progresses through 78%, then continues to decrease down to about 65% by redline. In layman's terms, the engine is too big for this turbo. The compressor needs a little bit more flow potential to match the airflow requirements of the engine.


        If I was designing a twin turbo system, I would have the target airflow at peak torque fall on the left of the compressor map closer to 70% efficiency, so that as RPM increased the airflow would walk "through" the highest efficiency band of the compressor. The way it is, it's starting the middle and dropping off as RPM increases. On the dyno chart, you could gain another 10-15% at peak power just by matching the compressor side better at the same pressure ratio. (Manifold pressure would be the same, the air flow would just be denser)


        Now I'm sure every will say "Just get a billet wheel, and all will be good". That isn't the case, as testing has shown that the new billet wheels make power on larger frame turbos, and that the gains in efficiency scale down as you reduce the compressor size and increase compressor speed. Billet wheels aren't going to solve this issue, the size of the compressor wheel will. In this case, a custom wheel (probably billet by design) and cover would be the solution without having to re-design all the supporting hardware that HPF has built.


        BTW, adding meth would help the situation a little bit, but it's not going to change the shape of the torque curve dramatically.


        Just my opinion."
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
        I posted this on another forum, thought it would interesting info to add here as well:

        "The turbos aren't too small, they just don't fit this engine properly from a flow perspective.


        The exhaust housing is not a big restriction, there's still more left in it before it chokes. Corrected mass flow choke point is about 15 lb/min @ a PR of 1.8, which I'm guessing is pretty close to what these turbos are running at on pump fuel. That's 300hp worth of exhaust flow per turbo...which they aren't doing yet. So in this case, we are not "turbine" limited.


        Looking at the compressor housing, it can flow a bit more than what is being used, but you need a higher pressure ratio to tap into that.


        The issue here is that the compressor STARTs in the middle of it's efficiency range at 4000 RPM which is 76% adiabatic, progresses through 78%, then continues to decrease down to about 65% by redline. In layman's terms, the engine is too big for this turbo. The compressor needs a little bit more flow potential to match the airflow requirements of the engine.


        If I was designing a twin turbo system, I would have the target airflow at peak torque fall on the left of the compressor map closer to 70% efficiency, so that as RPM increased the airflow would walk "through" the highest efficiency band of the compressor. The way it is, it's starting the middle and dropping off as RPM increases. On the dyno chart, you could gain another 10-15% at peak power just by matching the compressor side better at the same pressure ratio. (Manifold pressure would be the same, the air flow would just be denser)


        Now I'm sure every will say "Just get a billet wheel, and all will be good". That isn't the case, as testing has shown that the new billet wheels make power on larger frame turbos, and that the gains in efficiency scale down as you reduce the compressor size and increase compressor speed. Billet wheels aren't going to solve this issue, the size of the compressor wheel will. In this case, a custom wheel (probably billet by design) and cover would be the solution without having to re-design all the supporting hardware that HPF has built.


        BTW, adding meth would help the situation a little bit, but it's not going to change the shape of the torque curve dramatically.


        Just my opinion."
        So essentially you do not feel the proper sized turbos are being used?
      1. PEI330Ci's Avatar
        PEI330Ci -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        So essentially you do not feel the proper sized turbos are being used?
        It's not as simple as it seems.

        Compressor maps don't take into account everything that the turbo is attached to that affects it's performance. You can theoretically have a great match, then find that the VE of the engine is different, and it shifts the operating range off the edge of the map.

        I'm not going to point fingers, but I know of one very well respected builder who is touting very good numbers from a car on the dyno, and I've found them technically impossible to achieve based on the compressor map. You just can't get XXX power from a turbo if you've got it operating far to the left of the surge line at X.X pressure ratio. I know...I said left of the compressor map....that's what makes it so strange.

        Anyway, all I'm getting at is that HPF has probably been excited about getting the RHD system finally working, and has gone a little bit ahead of the normal R&D curve in releasing the kit with only dyno testing under their belt. There will be revisions and changes that I don't doubt will make the LHD guys think twice about the single turbo kits. Chris is a visionary and reads the market exceptionally well, I don't think he's got it wrong in this case....just a little bit "off".
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
        I'm not going to point fingers, but I know of one very well respected builder who is touting very good numbers from a car on the dyno, and I've found them technically impossible to achieve based on the compressor map.
        Who and with what motor/turbo?
      1. George Smooth's Avatar
        George Smooth -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
        It's not as simple as it seems.

        Compressor maps don't take into account everything that the turbo is attached to that affects it's performance. You can theoretically have a great match, then find that the VE of the engine is different, and it shifts the operating range off the edge of the map.

        I'm not going to point fingers, but I know of one very well respected builder who is touting very good numbers from a car on the dyno, and I've found them technically impossible to achieve based on the compressor map. You just can't get XXX power from a turbo if you've got it operating far to the left of the surge line at X.X pressure ratio. I know...I said left of the compressor map....that's what makes it so strange.

        Anyway, all I'm getting at is that HPF has probably been excited about getting the RHD system finally working, and has gone a little bit ahead of the normal R&D curve in releasing the kit with only dyno testing under their belt. There will be revisions and changes that I don't doubt will make the LHD guys think twice about the single turbo kits. Chris is a visionary and reads the market exceptionally well, I don't think he's got it wrong in this case....just a little bit "off".
        I think he has gotten it quite a bit "off" without realizing. The LHD cars have been doing the marketing for all potential RHD owners. They have built in their mind that type of power level and the various staging going up to pretty high powers. They then release a 500whp kit that is at its limit and undersized for the S54 and start marketing it as a excellent package for track use etc. A lot of potential buyers are disappointed with the outcome, I personally know of three that where cash in hand. The error was that the mid frame turbos should have been used as a start point even if it meant many more months development. Sooner or later the customer with the RHD car at HPF is going to want it back and that will be the end of the development for the RHD cars.
      1. PEI330Ci's Avatar
        PEI330Ci -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Who and with what motor/turbo?
        This person is a really valuable source of information for a lot of people including myself, so I'd rather not say exactly what I found. I still respect what his builds do, and they have some great "firsts" coming out of this shop, but the power numbers confuse me. If people compared dyno numbers to compressor maps, they'd see what I mean. That's all I want to say.

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by George Smooth Click here to enlarge
        I think he has gotten it quite a bit "off" without realizing. The LHD cars have been doing the marketing for all potential RHD owners. They have built in their mind that type of power level and the various staging going up to pretty high powers. They then release a 500whp kit that is at its limit and undersized for the S54 and start marketing it as a excellent package for track use etc. A lot of potential buyers are disappointed with the outcome, I personally know of three that where cash in hand. The error was that the mid frame turbos should have been used as a start point even if it meant many more months development. Sooner or later the customer with the RHD car at HPF is going to want it back and that will be the end of the development for the RHD cars.
        You certainly cut to the point, and I respect that.

        I think the existing RHD power band is suited to street driving where you want a quick kick in the pants, then shut it down before the next stoplight. Track guys want a wide and flat torque curve that's linear; this torque cliff is kind of hard to drive on a road course....although the Rally guys love that type of power.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by George Smooth Click here to enlarge
        I think he has gotten it quite a bit "off" without realizing. The LHD cars have been doing the marketing for all potential RHD owners. They have built in their mind that type of power level and the various staging going up to pretty high powers. They then release a 500whp kit that is at its limit and undersized for the S54 and start marketing it as a excellent package for track use etc. A lot of potential buyers are disappointed with the outcome, I personally know of three that where cash in hand. The error was that the mid frame turbos should have been used as a start point even if it meant many more months development. Sooner or later the customer with the RHD car at HPF is going to want it back and that will be the end of the development for the RHD cars.
        People can't hold the LHD and RHD cars to the same standards.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
        This person is a really valuable source of information for a lot of people including myself, so I'd rather not say exactly what I found. I still respect what his builds do, and they have some great "firsts" coming out of this shop, but the power numbers confuse me. If people compared dyno numbers to compressor maps, they'd see what I mean. That's all I want to say.
        I understand and respect this. It is still going to bug the hell out of me.
      1. George Smooth's Avatar
        George Smooth -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        People can't hold the LHD and RHD cars to the same standards.
        Sure they cannot once they are released. But up to that point the RHD guys have been using the LHD as a reference in their mind when considering a turbo option or moving onto another platform. Similar affect to when the US guys discovered they where getting a watered down E36 M3.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by George Smooth Click here to enlarge
        Sure they cannot once they are released. But up to that point the RHD guys have been using the LHD as a reference in their mind when considering a turbo option or moving onto another platform. Similar affect to when the US guys discovered they where getting a watered down E36 M3.
        In a sense, true, but RHD people needs to understand the design differences and can't expect the same things.
      1. George Smooth's Avatar
        George Smooth -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        In a sense, true, but RHD people needs to understand the design differences and can't expect the same things.
        Sure, there was also a chance they said they can't or won't do it. I am just expressing the sentiment of a few potential clients I know.