• 3.3 liter triple turbo inline 6 cylinder confirmed for next generation F30 M3 - Motor to possibly power X3 M as well

      Looks like those triple turbo rumors 6 cylinder rumors for the X3 M were true. Auto Express reports they confirmed the triple turbo 3.3 liter with head of M Dr. Nitschke. 450 horsepower is the expected output with 2 turbos fed by gasoline and 1 that is electric. How would this work? We aren't entirely sure how BMW plans to arrange them but the attached diagram may help resolve how the turbos could be positioned with an inline 6 with the electric turbo in the middle working as a sort of quasi-compound turbo setup.

      This article was originally published in forum thread: Auto Express: The next flagship BMW 3 Series will be powered by an amazing 450bhp tri-turbo engine started by KB View original post
      Comments 29 Comments
      1. Eleventeen's Avatar
        Eleventeen -
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      1. GG///M3's Avatar
        GG///M3 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Eleventeen Click here to enlarge
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        Plus 1
      1. black bnr32's Avatar
        black bnr32 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sorena Click here to enlarge
        also the 3.3liter displacement sounds like a V6 based on S63, if so you are screwed BMW.
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      1. andrew20195's Avatar
        andrew20195 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Why not? What is it then?
        The word turbo is short for turbosupercharger, that is to say, a supercharger driven by a turbine. If there is no turbine, and it is driven purely by an electric motor, it cannot be considered a turbo. At that point, it is simply an electrical supercharger. It likely will use a centrifugal compressor, like a turbo, but so does every E9x M3 supercharger system. Nobody calls those turbos.
      1. George Smooth's Avatar
        George Smooth -
        The third turbo could be a electric motor and the marketing guys are having a field day throwing terms around. Three turbo chargers is a big mechanical nightmare for the power they want to make unless we see a car with peak power from 3000-7500rpm. BMW's tactics are starting of little bits and pieces is getting to me now.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by andrew20195 Click here to enlarge
        The word turbo is short for turbosupercharger, that is to say, a supercharger driven by a turbine. If there is no turbine, and it is driven purely by an electric motor, it cannot be considered a turbo. At that point, it is simply an electrical supercharger. It likely will use a centrifugal compressor, like a turbo, but so does every E9x M3 supercharger system. Nobody calls those turbos.
        I don't think you can say it is just driven by electricity as we simply don't know if electricity is used to spool and then exhaust gas comes in later. It is premature to call it a supercharger especially when BMW themselves is calling it a turbo. Until further information comes in, we should go with what BMW has provided is which is information on a tri-turbo setup assisted by electricity. To what extent, we do not know.
      1. metrik's Avatar
        metrik -
        I've been doing a little research on this, and of course wikipedia came through for me. Due to the fact that BMW is calling it a turbo, I think it's pretty safe to assume that it will be a device like this:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_turbochargerBasically it is just a regular turbo that has been decoupled in the middle, with an electric generator on the turbine, and an electric motor on the compressor. At steady speeds, the turbine power output is matched to the compressor requirements, but when the driver depresses the throttle, stored energy (battery) is used to bring the turbo up to speed in less than 500ms, eliminating lag.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by metrik Click here to enlarge
        I've been doing a little research on this, and of course wikipedia came through for me. Due to the fact that BMW is calling it a turbo, I think it's pretty safe to assume that it will be a device like this:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_turbochargerBasically it is just a regular turbo that has been decoupled in the middle, with an electric generator on the turbine, and an electric motor on the compressor. At steady speeds, the turbine power output is matched to the compressor requirements, but when the driver depresses the throttle, stored energy (battery) is used to bring the turbo up to speed in less than 500ms, eliminating lag.
        That actually makes a lot of sense.
      1. PEI330Ci's Avatar
        PEI330Ci -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by metrik Click here to enlarge
        I've been doing a little research on this, and of course wikipedia came through for me. Due to the fact that BMW is calling it a turbo, I think it's pretty safe to assume that it will be a device like this:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_turbochargerBasically it is just a regular turbo that has been decoupled in the middle, with an electric generator on the turbine, and an electric motor on the compressor. At steady speeds, the turbine power output is matched to the compressor requirements, but when the driver depresses the throttle, stored energy (battery) is used to bring the turbo up to speed in less than 500ms, eliminating lag.
        Bingo!

        There is a company that has been developing this in the UK for a number of years. It is a functional system, but needs to be integrated into the engine management. That's where the OEMs come in...as current aftermarket ECUs (with the exception of the McLaren SCU system) are unable to integrate with it.

        We will most likely see this in 2014 in F1 cars when they switch to the 1.6L turbo engines.