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    • How do you punish car thieves trying to steal your BMW? With a Dubstep security system

      We hate car thieves and have absolutely no problem with extreme security systems that punish them when they attempt to steal a car. This one is a little bit different and leaves a bit of a mess but definitely teaches a lesson. Warning, if you are a bit squeamish or the sight of blood makes you woozy you might want to skip this video. You have been warned.



      This article was originally published in forum thread: How do you punish car thieves trying to steal your BMW? With a Dubstep security system started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 44 Comments
      1. dreikraft's Avatar
        dreikraft -
        umm, thats sick. good find sticky!
      1. Sorena's Avatar
        Sorena -
        what a mess ! a shutgun would do that much cleaner Click here to enlarge
      1. Forced Air's Avatar
        Forced Air -
        where do we buy?
      1. blkclk550's Avatar
        blkclk550 -
        AWESOME!! just don't like the fact they didn't make the Hair vibrate from such a high base!
      1. DBFIU's Avatar
        DBFIU -
        I love dubstep
      1. blkclk550's Avatar
        blkclk550 -
        Click here to enlarge
      1. DBFIU's Avatar
        DBFIU -
        Attachment 7800
      1. jacobs323i's Avatar
        jacobs323i -
        ive had this security system for years, this is nothing newClick here to enlarge
      1. nickr519's Avatar
        nickr519 -
        Dubstep = tempo-halfed breakbeat with a signature bass synth waveform. How original. Not that 90% of electronic music is original anyway.
      1. DBFIU's Avatar
        DBFIU -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge
        Dubstep = tempo-halfed breakbeat with a signature bass synth waveform. How original. Not that 90% of electronic music is original anyway.
        Do you produce? Because I do.

        Have you ever sculpted a sound before? Used your own signal generators to produce a perfectly equalized waveform? Taken over 6 months to make one 'electronic' track with over 80 channels of instruments and effects? Have you ever appreciated what real audio mastering entails?

        Like not just pushing buttons, but carving a sound into something beautiful?

        Just wondering, since self expression through electronic music is sorta new. I'm sure when Bach came out with his $#@!, everyone was saying "yo fool that piano is so not original".

        there is good techno and bad techno, but calling 90% of an entire genre unoriginal is pretty dumb.

        Just sayin'

        Click here to enlarge
      1. e92's Avatar
        e92 -
        did thay died?
      1. Yukohama's Avatar
        Yukohama -
        that's a sick alarm system
      1. nickr519's Avatar
        nickr519 -
        Ok, I'm gonna try my very best not to be a completely pretentious dick in my response, but I play jazz and classical piano, guitar, bass guitar, and percussion, and have for a decent amount of years; I have an entire recording setup in my house and have done some recording as well as live sound for a few years, and I messed with electronic music in high school. I've taken far more than 6 months to perfect various pieces; the difference is, if the power grid in my city went completely out for a year straight, I could still make the same beautiful music every single second of every single day of that year, and you could do nothing; that lack of slavery that is innate to electronic music is extremely freeing from an personal expressive aspect. Every single musical instrument besides the computer is expressely for the purpose of creating music, and requires some form of physical coordination, aside from being able to click a mouse, look at a screen, and type on a keyboard. I'm an electrical engineering student, I'm somewhat proficient with OOP and could probably sounds from scratch if I so desired. I'm definitely not discounting the time and effort that goes into electronic music production. Just don't see the point. Additionally, calling 90% of all electronic music as unoriginal is certainly quite stupid, considering I don't really know what constitutes "original", especially since its generally believed that the human brain is incapable of creating new thought; also, I pulled that number out of my ass.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge
        Ok, I'm gonna try my very best not to be a completely pretentious dick in my response, but I play jazz and classical piano, guitar, bass guitar, and percussion, and have for a decent amount of years; I have an entire recording setup in my house and have done some recording as well as live sound for a few years, and I messed with electronic music in high school. I've taken far more than 6 months to perfect various pieces; the difference is, if the power grid in my city went completely out for a year straight, I could still make the same beautiful music every single second of every single day of that year, and you could do nothing; that lack of slavery that is innate to electronic music is extremely freeing from an personal expressive aspect. Every single musical instrument besides the computer is expressely for the purpose of creating music, and requires some form of physical coordination, aside from being able to click a mouse, look at a screen, and type on a keyboard. I'm an electrical engineering student, I'm somewhat proficient with OOP and could probably sounds from scratch if I so desired. I'm definitely not discounting the time and effort that goes into electronic music production. Just don't see the point. Additionally, calling 90% of all electronic music as unoriginal is certainly quite stupid, considering I don't really know what constitutes "original", especially since its generally believed that the human brain is incapable of creating new thought; also, I pulled that number out of my ass.
        I do not necessarily agree with everything you said but think you conveyed your point well in an interesting post. Additionally, some spacing to break it up would have helped but you raise some good points.

        Thing is, I do most of my work on the computer and although I do not write everything with a pen and paper somehow I don't think that diminishes what I'm writing. Although the argument could made the text has less thought put into it as I know I can correct/edit it at any time rather than taking the time to think much further ahead working within a medium with different properties yet still producing an end result that is eventually read.

        This forum just would not be as exciting through postal mail, you dig? Different formats sometimes have different standards. It's a very interesting philosophical question you are hinting at.
      1. DBFIU's Avatar
        DBFIU -
        I cannot say any genre of music is unoriginal. I cannot play the piano, or the guitar or any single instrument for that matter.

        So I rely completely on my software to produce music, which is why it is more important to me than say someone like yourself that can play an acoustic instrument.

        If my city lost power then yes I would have no way of producing, but if your guitar strings broke at 12 AM and guitar center was closed, youd be kinda $#@!ed too. Arguments like "what if" kinda apply universally to everybody.

        But I understand where you are coming from.
      1. SSDD's Avatar
        SSDD -
        I think it's just ingrained in you to hate any form of synthesized music in music theory/performance classes. I don't see the problem with liking, if not at least respecting, both sides.

        This conversation reminds of the 'your sport isn't a real sport' argument.
      1. DBFIU's Avatar
        DBFIU -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by SSDD Click here to enlarge
        I think it's just ingrained in you to hate any form of synthesized music in music theory/performance classes. I don't see the problem with liking, if not at least respecting, both sides.

        This conversation reminds of the 'your sport isn't a real sport' argument.
        This.

        I pretty much never took a single formal music class, I self taught myself music theory and sound synthesis and mastering. I have a tremendous amount of respect for acoustic performers such as the mammoth Chopin, Bach and Beethoven. I love the acoustic bass guitar and I also happen to play the australian aborigine didgeridoo (I lied when I said I didnt play a single instrument).

        But, I find it more enjoyable to produce electronic music because I have more freedom. Where in a guitar you are limited by a range of sounds, in electronic music I can create an infinite combination of sounds and moods. I pretty much like every genre of music from rap to drum and bass (my fav) and everything in between except country.

        So, saying that techno and dubstep is just repetitive electronic music is like saying that metal is just repetative lead guitar chords.
      1. nickr519's Avatar
        nickr519 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Thing is, I do most of my work on the computer and although I do not write everything with a pen and paper somehow I don't think that diminishes what I'm writing. Although the argument could made the text has less thought put into it as I know I can correct/edit it at any time rather than taking the time to think much further ahead working within a medium with different properties yet still producing an end result that is eventually read.

        This forum just would not be as exciting through postal mail, you dig? Different formats sometimes have different standards. It's a very interesting philosophical question you are hinting at.
        The analogy of you doing work on a computer nor the forum being by post has really no relevance to a debate about music ... That being said, I'm a big fan of handwriting personally as it much more effectively embeds information into my brain, and I think handwritten letters that I write people are far more thought out and insightful than emails.
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DBFIU Click here to enlarge
        I cannot say any genre of music is unoriginal. I cannot play the piano, or the guitar or any single instrument for that matter.

        So I rely completely on my software to produce music, which is why it is more important to me than say someone like yourself that can play an acoustic instrument.

        If my city lost power then yes I would have no way of producing, but if your guitar strings broke at 12 AM and guitar center was closed, youd be kinda $#@!ed too. Arguments like "what if" kinda apply universally to everybody.

        But I understand where you are coming from.
        I'm not sure of your point about an instrument breaking ... Click here to enlarge
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by SSDD Click here to enlarge
        I think it's just ingrained in you to hate any form of synthesized music in music theory/performance classes. I don't see the problem with liking, if not at least respecting, both sides.
        This conversation reminds of the 'your sport isn't a real sport' argument.
        Aside from taking piano lessons as a young child, I'm entirely self taught, so I wouldn't really know ... but this hasn't been my experience at all. I already noted I respect electronic musicians for what they do, and listen to some electronic music myself; I just think there is something that innately separates what they do from what I do.
        All forms of musical instruments besides the computer require physical coordination combined with rhythm, to create sound "as it happens", whereas producing doesn't require you to physically create the rhythm whatsoever: the clocking output of the CPU ultimately does this for you. This is where electronic music and acoustic music can never be reconciled as entirely equatable, at least in my mind.
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DBFIU Click here to enlarge
        This.

        I pretty much never took a single formal music class, I self taught myself music theory and sound synthesis and mastering. I have a tremendous amount of respect for acoustic performers such as the mammoth Chopin, Bach and Beethoven. I love the acoustic bass guitar and I also happen to play the australian aborigine didgeridoo (I lied when I said I didnt play a single instrument).

        But, I find it more enjoyable to produce electronic music because I have more freedom. Where in a guitar you are limited by a range of sounds, in electronic music I can create an infinite combination of sounds and moods. I pretty much like every genre of music from rap to drum and bass (my fav) and everything in between except country.
        That's awesome that you play the didgeridoo, I've always wanted to learn! Could never get the circular breathing to work. I have a lot of respect for self taught musicians of any kind, as this was the case for me learning guitar, bass, and drums.
        I've heard the range of sounds point about electronic music from several different people. I guess I think about it differently. I strongly, strongly, strongly disagree that I'm "limited" by a range of sounds with my guitar, piano, bass, drums, or any other acoustic instrument really, as a function of how the human body works. We "analog" coordination (in a sense) that allows us to physically apply our force and finesse within some set range based on our abilities, and anywhere in between ... anyone who would tell you they're "limited" by the sound of any instrument is frankly not much of a musician; music expresses the human experience, to say it's limited in any way is far off, IMHO.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge
        The analogy of you doing work on a computer nor the forum being by post has really no relevance to a debate about music ... That being said, I'm a big fan of handwriting personally as it much more effectively embeds information into my brain, and I think handwritten letters that I write people are far more thought out and insightful than emails.
        A making a point about a medium, in this case writing, and the approach of traditional vs. modern.
      1. DBFIU's Avatar
        DBFIU -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge


        I'm not sure of your point about an instrument breaking ... Click here to enlarge
        The point was, just as my power might cut off for no reason due to some uneventful reason; your strings might just snap. Basically, yes i require electrical power for me to use my instrument but you require taught strings which can also break. So that makes the argument moot.


        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge
        Aside from taking piano lessons as a young child, I'm entirely self taught, so I wouldn't really know ... but this hasn't been my experience at all. I already noted I respect electronic musicians for what they do, and listen to some electronic music myself; I just think there is something that innately separates what they do from what I do.
        Yes I do agree that there is a different skill required to actually play an instrument, there is no argument there on my behalf.

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge

        All forms of musical instruments besides the computer require physical coordination combined with rhythm, to create sound "as it happens", whereas producing doesn't require you to physically create the rhythm whatsoever: the clocking output of the CPU ultimately does this for you. This is where electronic music and acoustic music can never be reconciled as entirely equatable, at least in my mind.
        Computer music production obviously doesnt require real time hand coordination, but since you are an electrical engineering student you should be able to understand the following concept.

        Say I were to record an acoustic instrument using a high end microphone, the acoustic instrument such as a guiter produces extremely irregular waveforms with many overtones (this is what gives the guitar a very rich sound).

        The microphone will capture all of this single, irregular wave. If you were to observe this wave using a typical spectrum analyzer, you would see peaks anywhere from 600 hz up to about 5k hz depending on what kind of guitar you use.

        This waveform that YOU produced with the stroke of your hand, is a unique waveform, it is not a sine wave, but a combination of a possible infinite number of sine waves. Sounds familiar? Fourier series, you probably know what that is.

        I can guarantee you, that with enough time and resources I can program my computer to produce a waveform that your ears will recognize instantly as a real live guitar. Which means, although I do not have the physical capability to produce that waveform, I broke down the acoustic signal using a combination of digital waves and produced your guitar sound almost perfectly.

        At the end of the day we are both producing the same exact sound.

        Now there is no argument about the physical coordination aspect of creating the music, but I can almost prove to you that I can make any sound you can make on your guitar, and then some.

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge
        That's awesome that you play the didgeridoo, I've always wanted to learn! Could never get the circular breathing to work. I have a lot of respect for self taught musicians of any kind, as this was the case for me learning guitar, bass, and drums.
        I do play the didgeridoo almost professionally, for fun though. Circ breathing is very hard because it requires a lot of practice, the funny thing is some people get it RIGHT AWAY and some dont. I have sinus inflammation so i cant always circular breath, it has to be an allergy free day. Maybe ill post up some recordings of my didge skills Click here to enlarge


        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge
        I've heard the range of sounds point about electronic music from several different people. I guess I think about it differently. I strongly, strongly, strongly disagree that I'm "limited" by a range of sounds with my guitar, piano, bass, drums, or any other acoustic instrument really, as a function of how the human body works.
        I will have to disagree here, and you should know why. A guitar can only produce acoustics in a 600 Hz to about 3k Hz range. That's pretty much it, unless you play a different guitar. Can you produce a 12kHz high E sharp on your guitar? No you cant, there is a physical limitation to your guitar by the amount of tension on the strings. I can hit 12kHz on my computer as a matter of fact I can go below and above the audible range with it.

        Lets not confuse range of sounds with 'timber'. You have an infinite number of tones and combinations you can make with your guitar, but you still are limited to a range due to the physical tension of the strings and shape of the guitar cavity.

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by nickr519 Click here to enlarge
        We "analog" coordination (in a sense) that allows us to physically apply our force and finesse within some set range based on our abilities, and anywhere in between ... anyone who would tell you they're "limited" by the sound of any instrument is frankly not much of a musician; music expresses the human experience, to say it's limited in any way is far off, IMHO.
        I guess I should have worded it differently, you have a limited range but you can produce unlimited waveforms or 'tones'. Basically, if you were pissed at your gf one day and stroked the guitar harder, you just created a brand new never heard before sound, but i guarantee you its still within the range of 600-3k Hz.