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    • Horsepower Freaks offering built/sleeved S54 shortblocks with options up to 1200 horse capacity

      Horsepowerfreaks (HPF) has released pricing and details on their S54 shortblocks. There are 4 options whose full specs are listed below. The first one offers a slight overbore, second is an OEM bock, third is a Darton sleeved underbored used block, and the fourth is a Darton sleeved underbored new OEM block with 1200+ rwhp capacity. Great to see these options from HPF.

      Option 1 (900rwhp - .020 Over Bore) $7,495.00
      • Send your used short block complete with crank, rods and pistons to us or pay a $2500 core charge
      • Strap your block securely to a pallet
      • It should be a motor that has never been bored or honed
      • We will magnaflux it and check for cracks when we receive it
      • We will build it to HPF specifications at .020" over bore

      Option 2 (1000rwhp - STD Bore) - New OEM Block $9,995.00
      • Securely Ship your used crankshaft to us or we will sell you one for $900
      • Greater wall thickness than option 1 from not having to bore cylinder walls
      • Greater head sealing surface area between cylinders
      • Built to HPF specifications at STD bore

      Option 3 (1200rwhp+ - .040 Under Bore) - Darton Sleeved Used Block $10,495.00
      • Send your used short block complete with crank, rods and pistons to us or pay a $2500 core charge
      • We will magnaflux it and check for cracks when we receive it
      • Darton sleeves are 4 times stronger than the OEM factory cylinder walls
      • Cylinder wall thickness increased drastically
      • Head sealing surface area increased significantly
      • Built to HPF specifications at .040" under bore

      Option 4 (1200rwhp+ - .040 Under Bore) - Darton Sleeved New OEM Block $12,995.00
      • Securely Ship your used crankshaft to us or we will sell you one for $900
      • Darton sleeves are 4 times stronger than the OEM factory cylinder walls
      • Cylinder wall thickness increased drastically
      • Head sealing surface area increased significantly
      • Built to HPF specifications at .040" under bore





























      This article was originally published in forum thread: Horsepower Freaks offering built/sleeved S54 shortblocks with options up to 1200 horse capacity started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 227 Comments
      1. Sorena's Avatar
        Sorena -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Umm, sure, more details, please.
        Seriously ?
        tell me in which parts you are interested and i'll explain it .
        please don't make me to explain all possibilities of power loss in the whole drivetrain , it's going to be a book and i don't have enough time to translate it to English.
      1. Karo's Avatar
        Karo -
        Read this while ago. Explains it pretty well.

        The whole concept of a fixed percentage drivetrain loss in evaluating chassis dyno tests is one of the most absurd things i've ever heard of in my experience as a powertrain engineer, and is the motivation behind this post.

        First, a primer: energy (or in the case relevant to this discussion -- power) cannot be created or destroyed. Simple enough? Where then, does that power that is transmitted from the crank, to the wheels, and ultimately to the road, go? Most of it goes to friction and therefore heat.

        Second, an illustration: For argument's sake, take a stock 90HP TDI, and we'll arbitrarily say that it has a 15% driveline loss. That means that the engine would be developing about 104HP (90/1.15) at the crank. The loss through the drivetrain was 14HP (104-90). Now, you do a bunch of engine mods without touching the drivetrain, and you now measure, say, 135HP at the wheels. Adding the customary 15% to refer back to the crank, you get 155HP, but the loss through the drivetrain is now 20HP, a difference of 6HP, WHEN NOTHING HAS BEEN TOUCHED THERE!

        Do you now see the absurdity of this concept?

        Firstly, may I submit that 2WD vehicles with manual transmissions have very good mechanical efficiencies, as evidenced by the fact that 2 quarts of non-pressurized, non-circulating oil is sufficient to keep the entire transmission cool and lubricated. In fact, to attach a number to it, manual transmissions are usually over 90% efficient, and many over 95%. That implies a loss through the transmission of between 5.3-11%. Even the best automatic transmissions with lock-up TCs achieve between 80-85% efficiencies.

        Secondly, may I submit that contrary to popular (mis)conception, flywheel weights, rim weights/diameters and tire type (should) have very little contribution to the HP numbers on a rolling road dyno. Heavy flywheels and rims act as inertial dampers but do not destroy or create energy, nor transform it to heat, as would have to happen to if it is to result in a greater or lesser HP value on the dyno. Tires will shed energy in the form of heat by the simple contact with the ground and also though the flexing of the treads and sidewalls, but this amount is negligable in the scheme of things that it is generally ignored unless you are an engineer for an OEM, race car team or tire manufacturer. More on inertia in a moment.

        Thirdly, I hope the above underscores that an accurate measurement of drivetrain loss cannot be overgeneralized. For one, it is not constant across the entire measurement range within a given run. In fact, friction increases roughly linearly with speed. In automotive engineering speak, this is quantified by a parameter called the FMEP (friction mean effective pressure), and although it's is not called that, it is manifested in many engine graphs you may read without even realising it. Frictional losses are different at 2000RPM to 4000 RPM, etc., etc. You cannot, therefore, equate the drivetrain loss of a car whose engine is turning at 8000RPM at the maximum rated power to one turning at 4000RPM, because on the basis of the RPM alone, frictional losses at 8000RPM are roughly double that at 4000RPM.

        That said, yes, it's true: gear selection when performing a rolling road dyno DOES have an impact on HP, but it is not usually borne in dyno results, because the difference is small and within the inevitable variation from test-to-test and also measurement error.

        Further, engine/driveline design considerations mean that there is a wide variance in frictional losses between different cars; the comparison of mechanical efficiencies between manual- and automatic transmissions have already been discussed above. Cars with AWD, automatic trannies, and large-displacement/many-cylinder engines will tend to have higher frictional losses than small-displacement, 2WD, manuals.

        Finally, The importance of "motored" or coast-down tests in a dyno evaluation is important and needs to be stresssed, because that is what accounts for your true frictional losses and balances the inertial "ledger sheet" of the different driveline components, including the wheels and tires. The energy that is absorbed in the form of inertia in the flywheel/wheels/tires, etc. is accounted for ("given back," to oversimplify) in this coast-down, and when doing a street (i.e. butt) dyno, also accounts for the very important aerodynamic drag.
      1. GG///M3's Avatar
        GG///M3 -
        Karo where did you copy that from?

        Click here to enlarge
      1. spdu4ea's Avatar
        spdu4ea -
        Only got this far:

        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Karo Click here to enlarge
        First, a primer: energy (or in the case relevant to this discussion -- power) cannot be created or destroyed.
        Energy is conserved, power is not.
      1. Jimefam's Avatar
        Jimefam -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by spdu4ea Click here to enlarge
        Only got this far:



        Energy is conserved, power is not.
        +1 I had a WTF moment when I read that. Click here to enlarge
      1. EricC's Avatar
        EricC -
        Option 3 for $10,495??? I called Darton and was told sleeves are about $800 and $1600 to install them.
      1. BattaM3's Avatar
        BattaM3 -
        And the cost of all the other parts and machine work for build engine. I would know. Lol