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  • 135pats's Avatar
    01-05-2015, 02:15 PM
    Question for single turbo amigos, or anyone with more knowledge on the subject of crankcase ventilation than myself: Is it dangerous or otherwise unnecessary to have an OCC with a single turbo? The single is going in as we speak, so I’m trying to determine what I can/should get rid of. Any thoughts on how these catch cans behave once you stray from stock turbos? Everything about the stock PCV system is awful, so I’ll almost certainly continue to run Rob’s PCV valve. Just curios what you all have done with your catch cans – if it’s just adding unnecessary restriction to the system, I’ll pull it. It’s the BMS OCC, which I’ve been perfectly happy with to this point. If this question is absurd, muh bad. Thanks and Happy 2015 :greetings-waveyell:
    244 replies | 4480 view(s)
  • dzenno@PTF's Avatar
    01-26-2015, 11:03 PM
    Given recent developments in flash based tuning we wanted to offer our insight into the inner workings of the N54 DME when it comes to boost control tuning or more specifically, PID based boost control. Boost control in the N54 OEM DME as well as most modern electronic boost controllers out there is based on what is called a PID algorithm. PID algorithms aren't exclusive to boost control and are applied to various systems where correction to a signal can be applied by feeding the actual value of the signal through the algorithm and adjusting control for it automatically by comparing setpoint/requested to actual and adjusting the controlling device which in the case of boost control is pulse to a boost control solenoid. Concept of a PID algorithm is quite simple. It is based around knowing two values: 1) Setpoint - in the case of boost control this is requested boost pressure that the DME is targeting for a given Load 2) Actual Value fed into the PID algorithm - in the case of N54 boost control this is the signal coming from the OEM TMAP sensor feeding back a 0-5V value representing absolute pressure DME converts the analog 0-5V signal coming off of the TMAP sensor into engineering units based on the Map Conversion table you can find in your maps. OEM TMAP sensor is a 2.5bar sensor. That means it can read 2.5bar of absolute pressure. This means your actual boost will vary based on your atmospheric/barometric pressure which needs to be subtracted from 2.5bar to understand how much readable range you've got out of your MAP sensor. This readable range above your barometric is what is referred typically as the word we all love and we're here for, "BOOST" (i.e. positive pressure or pressure above barometric). The OEM N54 DME works on the principle of Load based tuning and PID based boost control. Load is a calculation based on various parameters primarily around "boost" (i.e. pressure at the MAP sensor - barometric presure) and charge air temp which in turn calculate into Mass Air Flow (MAF). N54 doesn't use a MAF sensor to meter airflow on the intake side. It calculates/infers it based on other values mentioned. In order to make boost from the turbos the DME regulates boost control solenoids via a PWM (pulse-width modulated) signal pulsing them and allowing vacuum to hit the wastegate actuator. The frequency of that pulse/signal is what is typically referred to as wastegate duty cycle (WGDC). This is where PID based boost control comes in and helps the DME regulate the amount of WGDC applied to the solenoids so that Target Load is hit as required. Very few of us speak about our tunes in terms of target load and it makes sense as most are used to talking about "Boost". While the DME targets a given load and given that Load is defined based on primarily boost+IAT+compressor maps and airflow modelling around stock turbos/intakes/intake pipes it ends up calculating a Requested Boost level. In your Cobb datalogs you can monitor this value by looking at the Req. Boost Abs. channel. You can refer to the Req. Boost Abs. as the DME's Setpoint for the PID based algorithm. When using Cobb's ATR software there is a hard limit at 1.28bar in terms of maximum Requestable boost. If for any reason your car boosts past this level the DME's safety mechanism will kick in to prevent motor damage due to what it perceives as an uncontrollable boost condition for its settings. For a tuner using ATR to get around this issue and provide a smooth tune they need to effectively remove this first DME safety by calibrating tables related to boost control and throttle management. In other words, if at any point in time the turbos were to spike boost and cause it to overshoot target to say 35psi instead of where they've set/expect your tune to be, given how they've set the DME tables up to get that extra 2-5psi out of your car, it ends up being quite unsafe and won't have the DME intervene as it normally should/would. With appropriate PID control and DME failsafes in place the signal to the solenoids is taken way, DME closes throttle causing DVs/BOV to open and vent boost and the DME goes into limp mode. If you've been around the N54 scene long enough or even owned an N54 for while, especially a tuned one, you know that there are countless N54s out there that have had an experience with either overboost (30FE) or underboost (30FF) induced limp mode issues that otherwise could've ended up in a tune that knocked damaging the motor potentially ending in a really unnecessary and expensive repair. Some N54 ROMs, such as the I8A0S and IJE0S, have had support added by Cobb (i.e. race code) so that the full range of the OEM TMAP sensor can be tuned with PID based boost control and the DME safety net entirely in place. It is only available with AccessTuner Pro (ATP) software and only by request to Cobb from a licensed protuner shop. Even with the above race code in place going past the limits of the OEM TMAP sensor with flash only tuning carries an extreme level of risk for a motor. N54 is a stout motor that we all know can take quite a beating but that hasn't prevented engine failures in the past due to various reasons but also due to poor and unsafe tuning. If you're running a flash-only tune on your N54 today, with or without the N20 3.5bar capable TMAP sensor, the hard limit is in place for the readable boost range of 2.5bar absolute (~21.5-22psi at sea level) inside which the DME's boost safety mechanism works. This is also the range in which PID based boost control has authority to adjust your boost. If your tune is pushing past 22psi rest assured that even though some tuners love throwing the word PID in their descriptions that PID simply doesn't exist and is virtually eliminated. Why? As mentioned before, PID based boost control revolves around knowing the actual boost. If you're seeing boost flatline in your logs at ~21psi it is at that point that PID based boost control and safety has basically gone out the window for your car/DME and all you're left with basically is the wastegate duty cycle which is mapped based on what is now a really skewed MAF calculation. Can you make power in this way? You sure can, but so could the old versions of popular piggybacks before CANBus days. There will always be multiple ways of making power on any given motor. We've also shown that pushing past the TMAP sensor limit is quite doable setting a former N54 HP/TQ record on a beta Stage 3 VTT twin setup. However, the difference at least with us is that we explicitly stated that such tuning is not recommended and WILL NOT be provided for any customer car given boost control safety mechanisms aren't in place. We are not ones to hand responsibility of appropriate tuning and throw risk into customer hands or make them stare at a boost gauge in hopes that they'll react in time to save their motor from uncontrollable boost spikes. It is also why we recommend going with an external form of boost control when tuning any car past its OEM TMAP sensor as there simply isn't any other proper way of doing it and certainly no way of using PID based boost control. Dyno glory numbers and tinkering are always fun and certainly help marketing buzz but its one thing to make power and another to do it with appropriate safety and control in mind. Bottom line is, if you see anyone claiming PID based boost control while going past the TMAP limit you can refer them to this thread and let them know they're missing a key piece of information to claim effective PID based control. You can also ask them what happens if your wastegate actuator sticks (not uncommon especially with wear on the turbos) or a boost control solenoid fails in the open position or when the car is already tuned to the edge at altitude and you drive down to sea level with the same map and heavily overboost. Not pretty, potentially very costly, irresponsible and just plain unnecessary given how far the N54 has come.
    157 replies | 3654 view(s)
  • GiveEmTheDD's Avatar
    01-25-2015, 04:40 PM
    Hi everyone, The last 24 hours has been crazy, but the results speak for themself. Yes, you read correctly, my car just made 607awhp/618AWTQ. Background: Over the last year or so, I have been fortunate enough to dedicate some much needed wrench time to my e92 n54 AT 335XI. Back in Nov, I was finally able to get my car to the track, and cut the XI record, running an 11.363 1/4 mile. My mods at the time were: FBO, e40 fuel, RB Turbos and some outstanding flash tuning my BQ and WedgePerformance. At the time, Rob@RB, BQ/wedge, and myself were thrilled with the results, but in all honesty I wanted to hit 10s. Since November, I was searching for more ways to get more EFFICIENT power. I happened to stumble across a post in a 335 facebook group, someone had posted a dyno graph showing standard RB turbos making over 600whp, what made it even more astounding was the power was all the way to redline. After doing some research, and poking around some other boards, I found a few threads talking about the results. Honestly, I was shocked with the comments from board members and a few vendors. I saw words and phrases that essentially were calling the dyno and owner a fraud, fake, "we tried that already it didn't net much" and standard RBs can't make that power. Nevertheless, I was still curious, so I found Brian May's # and left him a voicemail. He gave me a call back about a day later, most of the stuff he was going over, honestly was way too advanced for me to fully understand, but after we spoke, I did some math on my own and it made sense. I had stayed in contact with Brian over the next few months, and we finally nailed down a shipping date to get me the 1st set of inlets. In anticipation for the new inlets, I figured my RB turbos, although nothing wrong with them, could use a "refresh." I was hearing exceptional feedback on Robs VSR balancing, and after speaking with a few board members who were using some of his billet wheel options, I contacted Rob about giving my RBs a refresh. I let Rob know I was planning on running Brian's inlets, and was very anxious to see what a fresh, updated (15T billet wheel, Vsr balanced, clipped, thrust upgrsded) RB could do. Fast forward to last weekend- Both Brian, and Rob delivered ahead of schedule and I was able to get the entire new setup installed in about 20 hours over the weekend, and the rest is pretty much history. Every aspect of Brian's kit fit perfectly, and went in without a hitch, and the turbos that Rob sent were equally beautiful in their own right. I ran the car around town a bit using the same map from BQ/Wedge at the track, and right away I noticed 2 things- the sound coming from the engine bay was intoxicating and the car pulled like an absolute freight train. Extremely anxious to see exactly how much more power we were making, I hit the dyno last night, and well the results are CRAZY. The Green Run- RB turbos, stock inlets (map I ran at track to cut 11.363), e60 fuel The Blue Run- New RB turbos, TFT inlets, SAME MAP as Green run LOL, e60 fuel The Red Run- New RB turbos, TFT inlets, Prelimiary revision by BQ/Wedge, about e60 fuel Sorry guys for the novel, but I wanted to give everyone as much of the story as I could. I want to give a huge thank you to Brian May@Trueform Technologies, Rob@RB Turbo and last and certainly not least Ken and D@ BQ Tuning by WedgePerformance for throwing that preliminary map together for me last night. I will say there is PLENTY of room left in my setup, I don't even think we exceeded 50% wgdc to hit 607 AWHP, and I've got my eyes set on a 10 second 1/4 pass in the near future. Thanks again team
    112 replies | 2895 view(s)
  • Vertigo's Avatar
    01-07-2015, 11:50 AM
    I wanted to start a thread where all those of us who have decided to go with a single turbo kit can share their experiences be it positive or negative. This includes tuning as well. For example, I am currently running lean everywhere except 100% throttle. I don't believe it to be any fuel system issue as much as I believe it to be a tuning issue as this is occurring at low boost under low load conditions. I want to keep an open dialogue of the speed bumps and how I manage to overcome them. (If I can) :)
    103 replies | 2441 view(s)
  • SCGT's Avatar
    01-15-2015, 03:55 PM
    The car: 2007 E90, full weight with a 15" subwoofer in the trunk. 105k miles! 6MT, Spec SMFW, BMW 550i clutch BMS DCI CP-e charge pipe with Tial BOV VRSF 7" FMIC 1 step colder plugs Riss Racing downpipes Corsa exhaust Fuel-it Stage 2 LPFP Fuel-it Protoype Supplemental Fueling System (stage 1) Vargas Stage 2+ Turbos (19t/unclipped) E60 fuel First, Tony was awesome to deal with. I ordered some stage 2's back long before they would be ready, and I knew this. Tony kept in contact with me and when the delays came, he with no questions asked if I wanted a refund. He was courteous, no BS, and extremely knowledgeable on the turbo side of things. My background is most recently as a test engineer working on turbine engines; Tony clearly knows his stuff. I will say that I had no issue with the delays as I ordered turbos before mine were completely dead. When the 2+'s were offered as an upgrade, I couldn't say no. Since I like ripping around and am not super concerned with 1/4 mile or trap speed, we decided on 19t compressor and unclipped turbines. If I were to do it again I might go clipped, because spool on these things is fantastic. Second, in full disclosure, I've been working as part of the Fuel-it! team for upwards of a year on the engineering side of things. The car has the Fuel-it! prototype supplemental fueling system on it. I'm sure you guys are going to have some questions on this, as you should. I'm going to be light on details, but on E60 and a solid HPFP (which has over 40k miles on it) we were able to run up to 25 psi while targetting upper 11's A/F ratio. An actual sample from in-tank measured at E62. As far as the tune goes, I went to my standby, Bren of Brentuning. He's been involved in tuning N54's since 2008 (DIMSPort open source back then). He really does have a ton of experience and he's been my go-to since my Subaru days. I told him I wanted something that was fast, fun, but kept in mind my car has over 100k miles on it, and I do like thrashing the car somewhat severely. Using a Cobb V3 and some wizardry, he ended up giving me a map that's running 25 psi tapering down to 16-17 at redline. Timing ramps to 13.5 degrees. The DME is not blind to the boost, but it is tricked -DME won't read above 22.5 psi (although I have one unicorn log that it read 22.6). As far as power output goes, I don't have the holy grail of N54 dynos (dynojet), I use Virtual Dyno. I will say, that I use the same stretch of track, with the same start point, and the same weight for the car (and even endeavor to have the tank within 1/4 tank each time). I did do a 60-130 using Steve's VBOX and with very little idea of what I'm doing (i.e. no FFS, no tailwinds/max acceptable downslope) ran 8.96s. I am 300 lbs. On a stock timing/boost target map, but running all of my mods, I put down 302/292. On my best FBO stock turbo E50 map I was 407/450. My most recent map revision on the VTT 2+'s is 500/555. Anyway, looks like I'm at about 500 whp with lots of torque. When Tony sends the upgraded turbo inlets, we're revisit this and see if we can open up a little more on the top end. I'm sure Bren could have gotten more out of them on a more aggressive map, but that was not my goal. Of course I want it all, but it's gotta be sane and handle daily driving thrashing. Log (I added "actual boost" based on testing): http://www.datazap.me/u/scgt/bretuning-vargas-2-19t-fuel-it-prototype-e60-log?log=0&data=3-10-16&solo=3&mark=75 Overall I'm very happy with the results. The car sounds and feels awesome, it's very fast, and it's very responsive -I'm nomally pretty sensitive to turbo lag and really don't like the feel of the average big-turbo car. These spool super quick, so much so that were I to do it again I'd really consider going clipped. The few people that I've had ride with me have normally commented on how different the engine sounds (Bren's VANOS magic) and then that's usually followed by "holy s&%$!" I love it. The next progression of things will be to add inlets, then change to 100% E85 and see where we're at. Thanks! Chris
    84 replies | 2527 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-05-2015, 03:00 AM
    This list from Autobild features stock and modified cars making it not exactly uniform but certainly interesting. You get a little of bit of everything in here. For those of us who do not use kilometers per hour 200 kph is 124 miles per hour and 300 kph is 186 miles per hour. Not every car that was tested to 200 kph was tested to 300 kph (or could make it there) which is why the 300 list is smaller. Also, do not be surprised a German car is on the top of both lists. The Germans like to feel superior but we all know there are much faster cars than what Autobild tested. 0-200 kph: 1. 6.52 s - 9ff G-Tronic 1200 (997) 2. 7.82 s - Heffner TT Ford GT 3. 8.21 s - McLaren 650S 4. 8,49 s - MTB GT-R Mission 1000 5. 8,62 s - Brömmler GT-R Alpha 9 6. 8.82 s - McLaren 12C Coupé 6. 8.82 s - 9ff GTurbo 1000 (997.2 GT3 RS) 8. 8.83 s - Lingenfelter C6 Corvette Z06 TT 9. 8.85 s - Bugatti Veyron 16.4 10. 8.86 s - Hennessey Viper 1000 TT 11. 8.91 s - HGP Golf VI R DSG 3.6 Bi-Turbo 11. 8.91 s - Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4 13. 8.92 s - GAD C63 AMG Black Series 4matic 14. 9.03 s - TechArt 911 Turbo S (991) 15. 9.30 s - Lamborghini Huracán LP610-4 16. 9.31 s - Ferrari 458 Speciale 16. 9.31 s - Manthey 996 Turbo GT-MR 18. 9.33 s - MTM MP4-12C 19. 9.36 s - Wimmer 997 GT2 RS 19. 9.36 s - GAD CLS63 AMG 4matic 21. 9.39 s - Porsche 911 GT2 RS 21. 9.39 s - TechArt 911 Turbo PDK (997) 23. 9.40 s - Sportec 997 GT2 SP 750 24. 9.42 s - McLaren 12C Spider 25. 9.44 s - Ruf 911 Turbo PDK (997) 26. 9.53 s - Heffner TT Gallardo 27. 9.60 s - Porsche 911 Turbo S (991) 28. 9.65 s - Novitec Rosso 430 Scuderia 29. 9.70 s - 9ff GT2 BT2-800 (997) 30. 9.71 s - Edo 911 Turbo S (991) 31. 9.79 s - SKN Audi R8 V10 X-Treme2 32. 9.80 s - Ruf Rt12 (997) 33. 9.82 s - Hohenester A4 HS 650 RR 34. 9.90 s - Ruf CTR3 Clubsport 34. 9.90 s - Brabus E850 T (E63 AMG S) 34. 9.90 s - HGP Golf V R36 Bi-Turbo 37. 9.92 s - Brabus SL850 (SL65 AMG '14) 37. 9.92 s - Saleen S7 Twin Turbo 39. 10.00 s - TechArt GTstreet RS (997) 40. 10.03 s - Porsche 911 Turbo S (997) 41. 10.07 s - Ruf Rt35 Roadster (991 PDK) 42. 10.09 s - Brabus Bullit by GAD Motorsport 43. 10.14 s - Wimmer 911 GT2 (997) 44. 10.23 s - Geiger Corvette ZR1 45. 10.23 s - MTM Audi R8 LMS 46. 10.24 s - Importracing GT-R 47. 10.25 s - 9ff 911 Turbo TR-63 (997) 48. 10.28 s - Lamborghini Gallardo LP570-4 Superleggera 49. 10.28 s - Sportec 911 Turbo SP580 (997) 0-300 kph: 1. 14.2 s - 9ff G-Tronic 1200 (997) 2. 15.9 s - Heffner TT Ford GT 3. 16.3 s - Lingenfelter C6 Corvette Z06 TT 4. 17.9 s - Hennessey Viper 1000 TT 5. 18.6 s - Wimmer 997 GT2 RS 6. 19.8 s - Bugatti Veyron 16.4 7. 21.1 s - 9ff GT2 BT2-800 (997) 8. 21.2 s - Sportec 997 GT2 SP 750 9. 21.3 s - Heffner TT Gallardo 10. 21.7 s - Brömmler GT-R Alpha 9 11. 22.0 s - HGP Golf VI R36 DSG 3.6 Bi-Turbo 12. 22.5 s - MTB GT-R Mission 1000 13. 23.1 s - Ruf CTR3 Clubsport 14. 23.5 s - Brabus Bullit by GAD Motorsport 15. 23.7 s - GAD CLS63 AMG 4matic 16. 23.7 s - McLaren 650S 17. 23.8 s - Brabus SL850 (SL65 AMG '14) 17. 23.8 s - Novitec Rosso 430 Scuderia 17. 23.8 s - GAD C63 AMG Black Series 4matic 20. 23.9 s - Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4 21. 24.9 s - Ruf Rt12 (997) 22. 25.1 s - Brabus E850 T (E63 AMG S) 23. 25.4 s - SKN Audi R8 V10 X-Treme2 23. 25.4 s - TechArt 911 Turbo PDK (997) 25. 25.5 s - TechArt 911 Turbo S (991) 26. 25.6 s - Saleen S7 Twin Turbo 27. 26.5 s - Wimmer 911 GT2 (997) 28. 26.7 s - Geiger Corvette ZR1 29. 26.7 s - Porsche 911 GT2 RS 30. 26.9 s - TechArt GTstreet RS (997) 31. 28.3 s - HGP Golf V R36 Bi-Turbo 31. 28.3 s - Edo 911 Turbo S (991) 33. 28.8 s - Lamborghini Gallardo LP570-4 Superleggera 33. 28.8 s - Ruf 911 Turbo PDK (997) 35. 29.6 s - Lamborghini Huracán LP610-4 36. 29.7 s - Porsche 911 Turbo S (991) 37. 30.0 s - Importracing GT-R 38. 32.9 s - Ferrari 458 Speciale Source
    2 replies | 11545 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-17-2015, 12:48 AM
    You may be noticing several S63TU flash tunes hitting the market this month. What will separate them is the quality of the tune, features, and of course the pricing. Eurocharged in addition to the horsepower and torque gains offers CEL (check engine light) deletion, a 300 rpm raised limited, and speed limiter removal. The horsepower and torque gains though are really where it is at and they are massive. On 93 octane pump gas the F10 M5 gains 120 wheel horsepower and 137 lb-ft of torque at the wheels with the Eurocharged tune and downpipes. That makes for a total of 650 wheel horsepower and 608 lb-ft of torque at the wheels on the Eurocharged Dyno Dynamics and that is a night and day difference over stock. A Stage II tune is on the way but the turbos are about reaching the end here. Race gas will allow timing advances but keep in mind the S63TU already pushes 22 psi of boost on higher compression than the S63 on which it is based. The tune retails for $1999 (tell them BimmerBoost sent you, I hear they love that) and the ECU must be sent in if you are not close to a Eurocharged location. Eventually OBD-II flash tuning will come but let's be happy we have flash tuning solutions for the F10 M5 and F13 M6. Further details on the Eurocharged downpipes will come later, contact @Jake@Eurocharged.com for any additional inquiries.
    83 replies | 1334 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-17-2015, 12:44 AM
    You may be noticing several S63TU flash tunes hitting the market this month. What will separate them is the quality of the tune, features, and of course the pricing. Eurocharged in addition to the horsepower and torque gains offers CEL (check engine light) deletion, a 300 rpm raised limited, and speed limiter removal. The horsepower and torque gains though are really where it is at and they are massive. On 93 octane pump gas the F10 M5 gains 120 wheel horsepower and 137 lb-ft of torque at the wheels with the Eurocharged tune and downpipes. That makes for a total of 650 wheel horsepower and 608 lb-ft of torque at the wheels on the Eurocharged Dyno Dynamics and that is a night and day difference over stock. A Stage II tune is on the way but the turbos are about reaching the end here. Race gas will allow timing advances but keep in mind the S63TU already pushes 22 psi of boost on higher compression than the S63 on which it is based. The tune retails for $1999 (tell them BimmerBoost sent you, I hear they love that) and the ECU must be sent in if you are not close to a Eurocharged location. Eventually OBD-II flash tuning will come but let's be happy we have flash tuning solutions for the F10 M5 and F13 M6. Further details on the Eurocharged downpipes will come later, contact @Jake@Eurocharged.com for any additional inquiries.
    83 replies | 630 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-17-2015, 07:33 AM
    What is the worst car you ever had? Well, chances are it probably was not as bad as the rides some of these people have had. We spend a ton of time talking about what the best car is, what the most powerful car is, and what the fastest car is. Rarely do we talk about the pieces of crap we have driven along the way. So take a look, take a laugh, and remind yourself how fortunate you are to be modifying whatever it is you are modifying for more power while some people are sticking their head out their sunroof to get a cheeseburger.
    21 replies | 5870 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-04-2015, 10:08 PM
    You do not need a ton of torque to lose control of your car. We all like to think of ourselves as badass drivers who can never have too much power but you do not need to have 1000 wheel horsepower or be going hundreds of miles per hour to lose control. This F82 M4 driver illustrates the point perfectly. While leaving Car and Coffee which is a popular Southern California Sunday morning car show where you can see everything from a BMW to a Bugatti this M4 driver quickly manages to lose control when trying to get on it apparently to impress some people who want to see exactly this sort of thing happen. There is a reason they have people hold up signs while you leave saying no burnouts to make sure that testosterone does not overwhelm common sense and lead to events such as this. We do not know what settings the driver had enabled on his M4 but speaking from experience when MDM is enabled it does a hell of a job helping keep the car straight. You can definitely see why manufacturers include traction control these days and why you will not see cars without some form of it despite the idea that people should supposedly be smart of to not need to be protected from themselves. So this guy gets on it, quickly loses control, and instead of staying in it and using the throttle to correct hits the brakes meaning physics being physics the car continues to carry toward the median which he promptly hits and crosses flying into the air. Fortunately he avoided the trees and any oncoming traffic which would have made this much messier. An onlooker exclaims, 'Got that on camera!' rather than 'Is he ok?' as is the social protocol today. Worry more about whether you captured the event than any potential harm to those who participated in it. Likes and views from strangers on the internet matter more, right?
    38 replies | 3777 view(s)
  • Tony@VargasTurboTech's Avatar
    01-13-2015, 09:54 PM
    Second round of fitment samples came back today. Changes to the front intake were perfect, they are both approved for production, and will be done in the next few weeks. We also got our second sample of the charge pipe and this one is what we wanted the first time, extremely free flowing Y merge, 1.5" ID the entire pipe, zero heat transfer. We still have to make a couple changes and get one more sample, but its getting there. You may ask how does it fit, we had custom CNC bungs made that will connect to the turbo outlets using the factory clamps, but we did them differently so they get rid of the neck down inside. All in all, these intakes, and this charge pipe will give the most flow your stock frames can put out, and get it into the motor as efficiently as possibly. Also the shotguns are basically done. We got our custom packaging in, all parts are completed, they have not shipped yet because our harness manfacture put the wrong pins in the male side of the harness extender and they all had to be sent back. Once those are fixed and we receive them, these will begin leaving. As always we appreciate the patience, and support.
    55 replies | 1810 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-08-2015, 01:03 AM
    The BMW S1000RR is a great measuring stick for a fast street car. If you can beat one of these bikes, congratulations, you have a fast automobile. Beating a modified S1000RR? Well now you are getting into that upper echelon territory and this 1200+ wheel horsepower Nissan GTR certainly fits the bill. The GTR is said to trap in the 160 mile per hour range. A stock S1000RR will trap just under 150. We have seen tuning results for full bolt ons get them around ~200 whp (depending on fuel, exhaust, etc.) so they certainly are capable of that 160 range as well when modified. This GTR owner may be sandbagging just a bit based on AAM's own performance ranges: The races start at the ~75 mile per hour mark. The first run they get an even start and the GTR walks the S1000RR. In the second run the S1000RR gets a nice jump as you can see even with a very fast car running one down is no small feat. It takes a ton of power to close that gap and a bit of time as the speedo on the GTR shows 186 once he passes and lets off. Per the GTR owner: "Both race were starting at about 70-75mph.. One was a even start which i walked him pretty bad so second race i gave him the hit.. He took off when i wasn't so ready and wasn't in my prime spot but i said $#@! it chase is a a race right?"
    30 replies | 5138 view(s)
  • Rob@RBTurbo's Avatar
    01-27-2015, 03:47 PM
    Here is a reference of the latest development of Standard RB Turbos combined with TFT inlets, allowing unrestricted RB Turbo Performance on our customer car documented here: http://www.bimmerboost.com/showthread.php?62716-BQ-WEDGE-335xi-w-RB-Turbos-607-AWHP-618-AWTQ-w-TFT-inlets-w-Sub-50-WGDC Datapoints- RB Car (Blue lines) E92 XI/AWD Automatic Transmission in 4th gear. Independent results. RB Standard Turbos with TFT inlets, Billet 15T Compressor, MHI 12 blade clipped turbine, stock charge pipe Boost- Unknown (slightly below 50% WGDC) Fueling/Tuning- OEM HPFP with inline LPFP. E60. Fueling insufficient at this time and to be addressed at a later date. Wedge/BQ Tuning. VTT Car (Red lines) E90 RWD Manual Transmission in 4th gear. Shop results. VTT 2+ Turbos with no inlets, Billet 20T Compressor, Proprietary 9 blade Garrett turbine with a 15* clip, stock charge pipe Boost- ~29-25psi (slightly below 70% WGDC) Fueling- VTT Double Barrel with SteveAZ LPFP solution. 100% E85. Fueling sufficient to max out turbos. PTF Tuning. As you can see the RB car having a very evident disadvantage with drivetrain losses, manages to absolutely destroy the VTT 2+ car at low RPM's and even hang right with them on the top end. The RB car seems to have much nicer results overall considering the drivetrain losses (not even considering the 20% extra WGDC potential in the RB's yet unleashed!!!). Without going too much into the hardware decisions made in each setup, it is fair to say that one is demonstrating a MUCH better curve and response than the other… while maintaining a similar top end at less effort. So sharing this comparison graph seemed appropriate. Thanks, Rob PS. Sorry if the overlay is not of the best quality. We had to have it quickly photoshopped. PSS. Some may take note of the VTT graph NOT being the advertised 645rwhp record. We will gladly redo the overlay if anyone can prove that the 645rwhp RECORD has a verifiable MPH dyno to prove it was in 4th gear (and not 5th); as we could not source that evidence NOR was VTT supportive in providing it.
    53 replies | 1476 view(s)
  • Tony@VargasTurboTech's Avatar
    12-31-2014, 11:07 PM
    We are pleased to announce the charge pipe, and intake fitment samples for Stage 3 came into and we are extremely happy with them. They are 100% 4 ply silicone 6mm thick, the intakes are of course wire reinforced and the charge pipe is rated at over 100 psi. With these parts out of the way and the water block final sample to arrive next week, we are finally nearing the finish line. We appreciate all who have remained patient, you will not be disappointed, we are confident this kit will set the bar for N54 performance. Happy New Year!
    51 replies | 1776 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-03-2015, 04:23 AM
    Underground Racing has a bit of an ace up its sleeve. Most people are aware of an 'X' package above the 2R but little is known about its power output or components. BoostAddict was tipped off from a source that will remain anonymous as to the power capability of the 'X' cars. A minor debate raged on the forums as to who has more power Heffner or UGR and the peak number on the dyno pull below show it is not even close. It takes well over 2000 wheel horsepower to play with the big boys these days. We just recently saw the GTR crack 2,000 wheel horsepower although it maxed out the dyno so its actual peak horsepower number is higher. How much higher? Well, likely not this high. It is safe to say UGR is the power king and getting ready to lay waste to the opposition. 2015 is going to be a lot of fun in the high performance realm.
    45 replies | 2254 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-02-2015, 12:14 AM
    It certainly is hard to keep a secret in this day and age isn't it? Somehow someone got a hold of this 2016 BMW G11 7-Series test mule and uncovered it showing it to the world completely undisguised. We have no idea who the man is or how he did it but we thank him for doing so. The styling is evolutionary rather than revolutionary. The current BMW styling language is featured everywhere and it is immediately recognizable as a BMW. The interior is what we have come to expect. The front features the new BMW Laserlight system. The big changes are really under the skin. All wheel drive 'xDrive' is expected as standard. BMW is also trying to shave a good amount of weight off the car although we will have to see just how successful they are in this attempt. The initial reports of a 500 pound weight loss target sure seem optimistic especially if xDrive is standard. Whatever the weight loss may be the new 7 is expected to be much more nimble. The return of a driver friendly 7-Series? Perhaps. We will know more when the car makes its official debut late this year likely at the Frankfurt Auto Show in September although due to this leak it could be bumped up significantly.
    7 replies | 7079 view(s)
  • BostonBeemah's Avatar
    01-06-2015, 05:13 PM
    Has anyone heard of this new fuel FTW Purple that people are using as an alternative to race fuel or e85? The power people are making is pretty ridiculous over their counterparts.. https://ftwfuels.wordpress.com/ I am also not associated with this site in any way but was just wondering if anyone has run this in their car and what their impressions of it were. Here's the fastest 5.0 NA which was tuned on this fuel. Just sounds too crazy to believe. http://www.svtperformance.com/forums/showthread.php?1051730-Went-10-47-133-today-NA Btw Sticky don't know if I'm not supposed to link to these sites so feel free to remove if necessary.
    49 replies | 1718 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-23-2015, 11:01 AM
    BMW did not produce a Z4 M car with the newest E89 generation vehicle. They raced one, but they did not actually build a street legal M car based on the E89 Z4. That's life and nothing can be done about it. These pictures below though sure make everyone wish they did build a Z4 M. This E89 Z4 is lowered on HRE S101 wheels. They are finished in a gunmetal paint which compliments the grey Z4 well. The car also features an aftermarket diffuser, trunk spoiler, front lip, and sideskirts. Oh BMW, what a marvelous car an E89 Z4M would have been. As that car does not exist this owner added on a Motiv turbo kit, Dodson upgraded DCT clutch packs, and JRZ RS coilovers creating what is the next best thing to a factory E89 M effort. Modification List: – Grigio Telesto – Motiv 750 Single Turbo – Gruppe M Intake – HPF Intercooler – Dodson Upgraded Clutch Packs – HRE S101 – AP Racing – Radical BBK – JRZ RS Pro Coilovers – Umbrella Cup Kit – Hotchikis Sway Bars – Meisterschaft Valvetronic Exhaust – Tommy Kaira Rowen Rear Bumper – 3D Design Front Lip – 3D Design Trunk Spoiler – Bride Japan Vorga Seats – Custom Focal & Audison Sound SYstem
    43 replies | 1757 view(s)
  • Tony@VargasTurboTech's Avatar
    01-25-2015, 11:47 AM
    Put the car on the dyno tonight, for a few runs with the new intakes on. The results were pretty much as expected, we can most likely get more power out of the car, but 640WHP on stage 2's (or RB's), very very doubtful. These results were had with no tuner on hand, Dzenno is Skiing, and made me 2 maps one with low timing and one with the high timing (the same timing we ran last time on the dyno), well due to a miscommunication on my part they were left for IJEOS(shop car), instead of I8AOS for the car these are on. So they were unusable meaning we had one back end flash, with timing set to 10-13.5 up top, which is 2 degrees less then we ran on the previous dyno session records. We also were having a very hard time getting boost smooth in the JB, Terry, and I worked at it for about 20-40 logs, and got it to this level of smoothness, for some reason the PID had to be dropped way down as very small PWM changes were making big swings in boost, even with PID this low boost would still do weird things. It would spool then quickly drop boost, then build it again, which is that little depression in TQ you see from 3500-4250 or so, after that boost would smooth out, and track pretty well to redline. On the previous dyno the Stage 2 record was achieved on 29psi peak to 17.5 psi at redline as that is all we could make. These numbers were achieved with 27 psi peak to 22 psi at redline. We couldn't go any higher as we were getting a LOT of corrections, and LPFP was going nuts, but we can easily hold 25+ psi to redline if we can get the other issues figured out, but BP and shaft speed with those little compressors is going to be up there, and not healthy. If we matched the previous boost in the midrange, and fixed the boost drop off then rebuild issue, the curves down low would basically be identical. As far as LPFP something is really going on there, I will investigate tomorrow, as its pretty scary. With this against us, we still managed to make 576WHP/615WTQ with all these issues, once Dzenno gets back, and we can have a tuner on hand as we dyno, as well as get the LPFP, and boost figured out, the graph will smooth way out, and we have no doubt should achieve 600WHP with a few more psi, and less timing corrections. Either way, the intakes do exactly advertised, offer you much more flow to redline, and a much more flat power curve where it counts in the high end of the rev band. I threw a graph in there against 2+ as well, there really is no comparison, 2+ leaves the 15T's in the dust on about the same boost midrange and 2 psi more up top. All, and all we are happy, and these delivered as expected, once we get tuning sorted, we should have nice clean graph, and right around 600/600. Not bad for a set of Stage 2's...:naughty: Break down: VTT Stage 2's Billet 15T's VTT Silicone intakes VTT Silicone Charge pipe VTT Double Barrel HPFP upgrade Fuel-it Stage 2 LPFP with 450 inline Cobb AP with PTF custom back end flash JB4 100% E85 All runs done in 4th gear Stage 2 Silicone Vs Stage 2 Stock intake Stage 2 Silicone Vs Stage 2+ Data Zap Log http://www.datazap.me/u/vargasturbotech/stage-2-silicone-intake-dyno-run-476?log=0&data=1-3-4-8-10-11-17-25-26-27-28-29 Jb Log
    43 replies | 1455 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-08-2015, 07:41 AM
    In stock form the F82 M4 is a pretty quick car by virtue of its 427 wheel horsepower and 429 lb-ft of wheel torque. That is good enough to get the M4 into the 11's in stock form and trap 119 miles per hour. So how much faster does the car get with a BMS JB4 tune? Well, much quicker and faster. Just a base stage I JB4 tune increases horsepower to 479 at the wheels and torque to 484 lb-ft at the wheels. With just bolt on modifications to the S55 motor the M4 can run 11.1 @ 123 in the 1/4 mile. The video below is not a 1/4 mile race but a roll on race showing a real world difference between a JB4 tuned F82 M4 and a stock M4. The stock car is the camera car and has the inside lane yet it gets pulled easily. Yep, a tune only S55 motor is a completely different beast.
    5 replies | 6779 view(s)
  • Tony@VargasTurboTech's Avatar
    01-22-2015, 11:56 PM
    Put the car on the dyno tonight, for a few runs with the new intakes on. The results were pretty much as expected, we can most likely get more power out of the car, but 640WHP on stage 2's (or RB's), very very doubtful. These results were had with no tuner on hand, Dzenno is Skiing, and made me 2 maps one with low timing and one with the high timing (the same timing we ran last time on the dyno), well due to a miscommunication on my part they were left for IJEOS(shop car), instead of I8AOS for the car these are on. So they were unusable meaning we had one back end flash, with timing set to 10-13.5 up top, which is 2 degrees less then we ran on the previous dyno session records. We also were having a very hard time getting boost smooth in the JB, Terry, and I worked at it for about 20-40 logs, and got it to this level of smoothness, for some reason the PID had to be dropped way down as very small PWM changes were making big swings in boost, even with PID this low boost would still do weird things. It would spool then quickly drop boost, then build it again, which is that little depression in TQ you see from 3500-4250 or so, after that boost would smooth out, and track pretty well to redline. On the previous dyno the Stage 2 record was achieved on 29psi peak to 17.5 psi at redline as that is all we could make. These numbers were achieved with 27 psi peak to 22 psi at redline. We couldn't go any higher as we were getting a LOT of corrections, and LPFP was going nuts, but we can easily hold 25+ psi to redline if we can get the other issues figured out, but BP and shaft speed with those little compressors is going to be up there, and not healthy. If we matched the previous boost in the midrange, and fixed the boost drop off then rebuild issue, the curves down low would basically be identical. As far as LPFP something is really going on there, I will investigate tomorrow, as its pretty scary. With this against us, we still managed to make 576WHP/615WTQ with all these issues, once Dzenno gets back, and we can have a tuner on hand as we dyno, as well as get the LPFP, and boost figured out, the graph will smooth way out, and we have no doubt should achieve 600WHP with a few more psi, and less timing corrections. Either way, the intakes do exactly advertised, offer you much more flow to redline, and a much more flat power curve where it counts in the high end of the rev band. I threw a graph in there against 2+ as well, there really is no comparison, 2+ leaves the 15T's in the dust on about the same boost midrange and 2 psi more up top. All, and all we are happy, and these delivered as expected, once we get tuning sorted, we should have nice clean graph, and right around 600/600. Not bad for a set of Stage 2's...:naughty: Break down: VTT Stage 2's Billet 15T's VTT Silicone intakes VTT Silicone Charge pipe VTT Double Barrel HPFP upgrade Fuel-it Stage 2 LPFP with 450 inline Cobb AP with PTF custom back end flash JB4 100% E85 All runs done in 4th gear Stage 2 Silicone Vs Stage 2 Stock intake Stage 2 Silicone Vs Stage 2+ Data Zap Log http://www.datazap.me/u/vargasturbotech/stage-2-silicone-intake-dyno-run-476?log=0&data=1-3-4-8-10-11-17-25-26-27-28-29 Jb Log
    43 replies | 1214 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-15-2015, 06:22 PM
    The S63TU flash tuning era is in full swing. As BimmerBoost first reported last year 'real' F10 M5 / F13 M6 ECU tuning was on the way and here is further proof. AMS Performance tuned the F10 M5 of an IND-Distribution customer equipped with an Eisenmann exhaust system, GruppeM airbox, and AMS downpipes. The result? 643 horsepower at the wheels and 606 lb-ft of torque at the wheels. This is over 100 wheel horsepower over the green graph which represents the F10 M5 baseline. With just the bolt on modifications the car made 550 wheel horsepower and 505 lb-ft of torque on the stock tune. Clearly to get the most out of exhaust and intake modifications a tune is necessary as AMS added 97 wheel horsepower and 101 lb-ft of torque on top of the bolt on numbers. Additional noteworthy details This is a true ECU reflash and not a piggyback tuner The speed limiter is removed. We can remove CEL’s. We should see things move forward rapidly now with the ECU's cracked. What is interesting is that AMS said two years ago they were going to use ESS for tuning on the F10 M5 platform as they worked on a turbo upgrade yet now AMS is doing their own tuning. Come to whatever conclusion from that which you want to but BimmerBoost believes ESS claimed to be able to tune the F10 M5 simply for publicity as nothing ever came of the claim and furthermore nothing could have as that ability was not yet available until last year. Now we should see things progress beyond the bolt on level. 700+ wheel horsepower here we come.
    30 replies | 3360 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-20-2015, 02:07 AM
    Surprised we haven't seen more talk about this:
    40 replies | 1396 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-10-2015, 12:52 AM
    Very nice turbo S54 numbers here from a Saad Racing built car. There are a few things to take away from this graph the first of which the tuning is done on a ProEfi 128 standalone engine management system (ECU). The car is tuned on ethanol but the ethanol percentage is not specified. The S54 engine is obviously built but we do not know the compression ratio. Probably something around 10.0:1 or 9.5:1. The turbocharger is a Precision 6766 CEA DBB unit and at 29 psi of boost shows 859 wheel horsepower and 710 lb-ft of torque at the wheels. Hopefully we will get more details on this car as it is making some serious power and torque on a Mustang dyno. This should be a 900+ whp car on a Dynojet and with a larger 6870 turbocharger from Precision 1000+ is within reason.
    15 replies | 5041 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-07-2015, 06:35 PM
    There you have it, the first 9 second Porsche 991 Turbo and what is currently the quickest and fastest 991 Turbo / S in the world. A back and forth in 991 Turbo tuning started with Simon Motorsport going 10.31 in the 1/4 mile only for PP-Performance to respond with a 10.003 run. The car was on the verge of 9's and now it is officially there with the latest 9.896 @ 137.783 mile per hour run. The modifications are as follows: Modifications: PP-Performance Software IPD Plenum X-Pipe | Downpipes | Headers 3in1 BMC Racing Filter Toyo R888 (Rear Tires) No word on the fuel used but one can assume race gas. No word on if any weight was stripped out either. The Toyo R888's in back help achieve a 1.412 60 foot. The 991 Turbo joins the 997.2 Turbo as far as get getting into the 9's with bolt ons. The 991 Turbo and Turbo S have the same size turbochargers but tuners tell us they are smaller than the 997.2 Turbo S units. Is there more in the 991 Turbo without upgraded the turbochargers? We will have to see.
    29 replies | 3676 view(s)
  • Vertigo's Avatar
    01-01-2015, 03:43 PM
    I picked up where he left off! http://www.bimmerboost.com/showthread.php?52278-mjmarovi-s-Single-Turbo-build-at-Proven-Power-Tampa I purchased my 2008 E92 335i about two years ago now with 60k on it. At 66k I installed the JB4. Then ISO and went FBO w/ E85 minus meth until 140k. Being very happy with the car and knowing that I will keep it for the long run I decided to jump all in after my SPEC 2+ clutch gave out in only 7 months! I scored a good deal on a used N54 head that I decided to clean up and send of to get the works done to, full p/p and radius'd, values cut and lapped, balanced new springs, new seals,etc ...(minus larger valves and lighter springs/retainers). Once I got the head back I cleaned up the combustion chambers and sent them off to get ceramic coated along with my pistons. Dirty vs cleaned up combustion chambers: Ceramic: Now began the real work! BMW TIS was used and printed out for all procedures and torque/fastening values (nm/in/lbs/ft/lbs). All Torque to Yield bolts were ordered new and the old TTY fasteners thrown out. I managed to get the car as high as possible on jack stands and get the transmission pulled out. At this point I was torn between going with upgraded twins or an appropriately sized single and wouldn't you know mjmarovi just so happened to be selling his Proven Power Single kit with the Forced Performance HTA3586r Tubro! We worked out a deal and I began pulling my stock parts send his way in the exchange. Just a quick aside... I wanted to give Matt a big thumbs up here as he was extremely professional to work with and I had absolutely no issues staying in communication with him at all with every txt msg, email, phone call. He was 100% honest with me the entire time and I would do business with him again in a heart beat, no hesitation! He even helped me troubleshoot a few issues along the way! Removing the stock turbos: Look at all that space! Valve cover removal: Time to pull the head. Having most of my experience on the Chevy LSX platform I decided to do due diligence on marking the way everything was positioned prior to removal. I love white out :) Notice the special BMW Timing tool used to TIME the cams later on. (Note: This tool will only TIME the cams, you will need an additional special tool that is impossible to find and costs about 1k to INSTALL the cams). I found this out much too late and wanted to bring it to your attention. Heads off! With 140k on the clock the cylinder walls look amazing considering what I've put it through. Look at that cross hatching! Cleaned up head gasket surface: Ceramic Pistons Installed!! Time to re-install the head! Remember that Cam Install Tool I mentioned earlier? Well it allows you to pre-tension the Exhaust Valve on Cylinder #2 and Intake Valves on Cylinder #3 along with aligning the cam bearing shells properly: When installing the cams make sure your rockers are sitting on the valve stems properly: Lets protect the VC from the new single manifold heat: REMEMBER to CLEAN OUT ALL THE HEAD BOLT HOLES prior to installing the new head bolts!!! They must be free of debris and liquid or you could crack you block in half!!! Finally Lets Get some Turbo Pics! HTA3586r!!! Continued...........
    38 replies | 1650 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-09-2015, 12:12 AM
    Dinan's piggyback tuning box for modern turbo BMW motors is now officially CARB (California Air Resource Board) legal. This also retroactively means it is effectively 50 state legal and any N55, S55, N63TU, and S63TU engines running this tune are emissions compliant. What is interesting to note is that for S63 and N63 powered vehicles Dinan still sells flash ECU tunes and not all of them are CARB compliant. As Dinan can not flash tune the F-Series N55, S55, N63TU, and S63TU that is why we see the DinanTronics approach on these models. Dinan responded to some of the questions BimmerBoost raised regarding the Dinan flash versus piggyback tuning debate but that is old news. Where we are today is that Dinan is offering a 50 state emissions legal tuning package for the modern turbo motors supplemented by Dinan's own drivetrain warranty. For those who are apprehensive to tune or who really care about their warranty (perhaps their BMW is a lease) Dinan certainly has appeal in this area. CARB certification is a major plus and will come in handy during emissions testing. That said, for anyone with a piggyback worried about emissions testing they can simply disconnect their piggyback. Not that the BoostAddict Performance Automotive Forum Network would ever advise any activities on the road that bend or break the law. Many of you may remember that BMS (who really would be the main piggyback tuning rival on the modern BMW turbo platforms for Dinan) ran into some CARB trouble. Dinan not having these same issues shows his reach and of course ability to get through the somewhat convoluted CARB certification process. This news will likely make more BMW turbo owners open to tuning as it will alleviate some fears. Those with BMW tuning fears are likely not reading this website. It really comes down to do you want emissions compliance for $2000+ (depending on model) or more power for less money from other sources which come with potential risks (that are easily mitigated)? Well the answer to that is up to you.
    12 replies | 5152 view(s)
  • DavidV's Avatar
    01-08-2015, 03:15 AM
    Presented at 2015 CES (Consumer Electronic Show) in Las Vegas, BMW showed their LED light and OLED rear light concept for the F82 M4. The front lights are similar to the i8 LED lights with a reach of 600 meters and a 'Selective Beam' function. The rear lights are OLEDs in a 3D configuration. BMW considers itself a leader in lighting technology and plans to implement the Laserlight system already used in the i8 in future BMW M cars. The F82 M4 certainly appears to be a candidate and no doubt the lighting system is striking. It looks very modern and, well, just plain cool. The lights of course have safety aspects as they are designed to help peek around corners to eliminate blind spots traditional lights do not reach. An infrared camera also helps the lights pick out and spot animals or people so they can be avoided. Munich/Las Vegas. At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES ) 2015 in Las Vegas, BMW is providing further evidence that it is a world leader in the development of Laserlight. Having already supplied its first models with Laserlight to customers, it is now presenting further laser functions for vehicles of the future. Laserlight is now able to offer its impressively long beam range of up to 600 metres in combination with the BMW Selective Beam function (anti-dazzle High-Beam Assistant). At CES, BMW is unveiling ways in which Laserlight, extensively integrated with assistance systems and vehicle sensors, can be used to implement new intelligent lighting functions for enhanced safety and comfort. For example, it can work with the navigation system to illuminate corners well in advance, while a laser-based Dynamic Light Spot can provide early warning of people or animals at night from a distance of up to 100 metres. New lighting technology opens up design scope. The BMW M4 Concept Iconic Lights model, with exterior paintwork in Cool White metallic, features a new interpretation of the typical BMW twin round headlights. On the move, the laser technology can be identified by the fine blue strips inside the lights. Meanwhile, the rear light clusters of the BMW M4 Concept Iconic Lights model are based on OLEDs (organic light-emitting diodes), which produce light from wafer-thin semiconducting layers of organic material. For the first time, both the tail lights and rear direction indicators feature OLED technology. The illuminated surfaces are positioned to produce a three-dimensional effect. OLEDs also take up less room on account of their thin size. Shining example of innovative technology: anti-dazzle Laserlight and laser projection. BMW Laserlight sets new standards in terms of beam range and brightness. Inside the laser headlights, the “coherent” monochromatic blue laser light is converted into harmless white light. A special optical system directs the rays from the high-performance diodes onto a phosphor plate inside the light, which converts the beam into a very bright white light that is similar to natural daylight and pleasant to the eye. Despite consuming 30 percent less energy, the parallel light beam is ten times more intense than that produced by halogen, xenon or LED light sources. BMW Laserlight also has a beam range of up to 600 metres, more than twice that of conventional headlights, for increased safety in the dark. The camera-based BMW Selective Beam system, which is controlled by dynamic actuators, prevents oncoming or preceding vehicles being dazzled and allows the laser high beam to be left on at all times. Enhanced safety through connectivity. Extensive integration of the innovative Laserlight with other vehicle systems allows a variety of intelligent lighting functions to be implemented. Integration with the navigation system, for example, allows the proactive Adaptive Headlight control system to illuminate corners even before the steering wheel is turned. Laserlight also adds a new dimension to the Night Vision system’s Dynamic Light Spot function. In pitch-dark conditions, people and animals can be detected from a distance of up to 100 metres, by infrared camera, and “spotlighted” by the laser-based Dynamic Light Spot. This is a longer range than that of any other system. Also, if the vehicle detects reduced clear road width ahead, the laser headlights can be used to provide “narrow clearance” lighting. A laser projection function indicates the exact width of the vehicle in relation to the road to allow safe passage through the narrow space. BMW M4 Concept Iconic Lights also showcases a further “visionary” system: “High Power Laser” diodes. This system projects driver information directly onto the road in front of the vehicle, allowing drivers to concentrate optimally on the traffic even in pitch darkness. OLED rear light cluster with three-dimensional effect. Organic light-emitting diodes – OLEDs – are an innovative, efficient, sustainable light source that form the basis for the BMW Organic Light system. OLEDs have a low power consumption, which helps to further reduce vehicle CO2 emissions. Another sustainable feature of this technology is the fact that no expensive rare earth metals are required in the production process. Unlike ordinary LEDs, which are a point light source, OLEDs produce light uniformly over their entire surface. The OLED elements are very thin, with a thickness of just 1.4 millimetres. Also, the individual modules can be activated separately, generating new possibilities for creating different lighting effects at the rear light clusters. Different lighting effects in different driving modes. In the past, rigorous legal requirements regulating the brightness of vehicle lighting have limited the number of lighting functions that it was possible to implement with OLED technology. On the BMW M4 Concept Iconic Lights model, BMW Organic Light is used in the tail lights and rear direction indicators. By activating the OLED segments individually, it is possible to create different rear lighting effects in different driving modes. Whereas normally the L-shape is wide and uniformly illuminated, in Sport mode a different-shaped light pattern can be used by activating only some of the OLED segments. The rear light then appears as a narrow, focused and sharply defined “strip” of light. New technologies create new design options. Lighting is an important design element in modern vehicles. From the front, all vehicles of the BMW core brand are instantly identifiable by the combination of their twin round headlights and the hallmark kidney grille. At night, the four glowing corona rings form a distinctive signature. The BMW M4 Concept Iconic Lights model presents a new interpretation of the twin circular headlight theme. The headlights feature laser technology which is attractively highlighted by fine blue LED strips when the vehicle is on the move. Thanks to the new laser technology it was also possible to give the headlights a flat and sharply sculpted design. The L-shaped rear light clusters are just as distinctive in terms of styling as the front lights. The “L” shape is a typical design hallmark that accentuates the width of the rear and gives the vehicle a striking and powerful look that always stands out from the crowd, whether at night or during the daytime. On current models, LED-powered light strips and other light elements emphasise the L-shape at night and make the brand identity more easily recognisable in the dark. BMW first presented a rear light cluster with OLED elements on the BMW Vision Future Luxury concept model, which made its world debut in Beijing in April 2014. BMW M4 Concept Iconic Lights displays its own version of this design. Its M-style OLED rear light cluster marks a new evolution of the typical BMW L-shaped lighting design which, with the BMW 7 Series launch, was reinforced with a distinctive “glowing” effect. OLED technology makes it possible to create a new, more three-dimensional and at the same time very sharply defined appearance. BMW M GmbH will be launching a production model featuring OLED technology in the near future. Source
    16 replies | 4669 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-01-2015, 09:55 PM
    Great tun here by a bolt on modified Porsche 991 Turbo S at the Palm Beach International Raceway in Florida. The car features a GIAC Stage 2 ECU tune as well as a Tubi race exhaust system. It lines up against a stock 2013 BMW 335is that obviously has no chance. The 991 Turbo S goes 10.460 @ 132.41 making for the fastest 991 Turbo S in the United States. We have repeatedly seen low 10's out of the 991 Turbo / S now but the question is when will we see a 9 second bolt on pass? It is going to be difficult or at least more difficult than the 997.2 platform due to having smaller turbochargers. As you may recall, bolt on GIAC tuned 997.2 Turbos have run 9's. Certainly interesting that the 997.2 Turbo at least with bolt on modifications has an advantage over the 991 Turbo. Once the turbos change on either motor they are basically even and it comes down to who fits the bigger turbos and upgrades the PDK transmission to handle them.
    26 replies | 3656 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    01-03-2015, 12:22 AM
    The BMW i8 performs well for what it is. It is designed with efficiency in mind hence the 1.5 liter three-cylinder gasoline motor. Supplemented by an electric drivetrain the i8 output is 357 horsepower and 420 lb-ft of torque. It moves a fairly lightweight (for BMW anyway) 3380 pounds. The F82 M4 is heavier than the i8 and does not have all wheel drive. It sends an underrated 425 horsepower to the rear wheels. It has more power than the i8 and despite being rated at 409 lb-ft of torque this figure is also underrated. Raw grunt is in the M4's court. The disadvantage for the M4 is that it is carrying just under 200 more pounds and that it does not get the instant electric torque benefit or all wheel drive traction benefit. On paper the way this should go is the i8 opens a slight lead only for the M4 to easily pull past it. Test figures have shown the i8 go 12.3 @ 114 in the 1/4 mile and independent drag strip results from owners for the M4 show times in the 12.1 @ 116 range. So what happens? Well the geniuses at Auto Bild in Germany use some crappy damp road for the comparison. They actually do a slow motion capture of the M4's tires going up in smoke off the launch. That doesn't look cool guys, it make you look like you don't know what the hell you are doing. The i8 wins although we get no data to go with it. It really is a victory by default as if one car is sitting there spinning its tires and the other hooks up and goes it is no surprise it wins even if it is less powerful. What should be a cool comparison turns into a joke. The M4 has nothing to fear from an i8 in a drag race. Especially considering they have already gone low 11's.
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