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  • Den*'s Avatar
    Today, 03:02 AM
    Well, i run it for about 6 months already (everyday car), so then i would confirm that it fits :) But question was actually to someone, who knows for sure. I have lots of sofa-racers/experts(this is how we call ppl who doesnt know for sure) and dont need more :)))
    63 replies | 11661 view(s)
  • Den*'s Avatar
    Today, 02:48 AM
    But again, i think our "head" is main restrictor but not manifold. however still unterested in manifold, since head tuning is a different level of tuning
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Den*'s Avatar
    Today, 02:42 AM
    Tony, good to hear you guys spend money and time for field test, appreciated. My conern of running with stock will be the fact that velocity will be different (across corners) when running high boost, thus the velocity loss will be also different i think, i might be wrong, but better to test it with boost +- 20 psi and gaing will be obvious i think stock manifold is pretty much good, but for stock. Where modified manifolds mainly target high boost applications, i guess
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 02:40 AM
    You guys are tossing around the word public and I don't think you know what it means.
    94 replies | 808 view(s)
  • Milan's Avatar
    Today, 02:37 AM
    why shouldn't he have the right to ask questions? it's a public forum.
    94 replies | 808 view(s)
  • Aaron's Avatar
    Today, 02:20 AM
    I clearly said there would be gains, not disputing that. But there could be substantially better gains with tuning as intake manifolds substantially alter VE.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • R.G.'s Avatar
    Today, 02:18 AM
    Look at the original post, the manufacturer claimed gains prior to tuning. You're correct but there are some claims being made that 3rd party testing would confirm or debunk.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 01:42 AM
    The wait is over as to who will take Nico Rosberg's seat. After Rosberg announced his surprise retirement, the search was on. Speculation ran rampant and Lewis Hamilton stated he did not want a big name to replace Rosberg which came off as insecure. Well, perhaps Hamilton will be fine with Valtteri Bottas. The 27 year old Finn formerly drove for Williams. Interestingly, Felipe Massa will come out of retirement to take Valterri's place at Williams. There are no details on the compensation or length of the contract but it seems to be a one year deal with team options. Bottas likely won't be paid anything like Hamilton meaning whether Mercedes-AMG admits it or not they have a driver hierarchy established. Bottas has yet to win a race. That likely will change in 2017.
    2 replies | 46 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 01:24 AM
    Sure but we're talking about a restriction at certain RPM points and you will see a difference if this is alleviated even without a tune. You will want a dyno tune to optimize but once again changing an intake or headers is not the same as changing turbos. Once again, you will want a tune to optimize things but if there is a significant hardware restriction removing it you will increase flow with or without software. I saw an increase by deleting cats before I had a tune for a cat delete.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Aaron's Avatar
    Today, 01:09 AM
    The headers, and intake manifold, change the VE/CFM of the motor, changing how much air is actually getting into the cylinders per intake/exhaust stroke, and can change these considerably when we consider timing the pulses. It's the same reason engines are able to get above 100% VE with tuned headers/intake manifolds. Although you will still see this on a dyno, the results will be truly limiting without tuning. And while a 5whp difference will still show the advantage, it won't justify the cost. However if tuning brings that up to 40whp, to many users it will justify the cost of the manifold.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 01:07 AM
    Some nice changes here for the 'new' 2018 Ford Mustang. Really, this amounts to a facelift but it's a good one. The naturally aspirated V6 is gone and nobody is going to miss it. The Ecoboost I4 is a better choice and it gets a torque bump for 2018. What else is new? A magnetic ride suspension system. Oh, and how about a 10-speed automatic? This was already reported by BoostAddict as coming in November, last year. GM and Ford developed this automatic transmission together and the Ford Raptor gets a variant as well as new GM models such as the Camaro ZL1. It only makes sense for the Mustang to get a version. Somewhat of a surprise is direct fuel injection for the 5.0 Coyote. It is a dual-injection system with both port and direct fuel injection. This allows a bump in compression to 12.0:1 from 11.0:1. This leads one to believe there will be power and torque gains but Ford has yet to provide the official figures. The interior and exterior also get minor revisions. The car looks great overall but what we really want to see is if the 10-speed auto carries over for the GT350. That would really elevate the performance of the car. Excellent work by Ford updating the Mustang. NEW FORD MUSTANG OFFERS SLEEKER DESIGN, MORE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY AND IMPROVED PERFORMANCE Sleeker design: New Mustang features a more athletic look, with new front and rear-end design that deliver a leaner and meaner look and refined aerodynamics More advanced technology: New Mustang technologies include a 12-inch all-digital instrument cluster that you can customize your way, MyMode with memory function that remembers your driving preferences for the next time you drive, and new driver-assist features such as Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection for increased confidence behind the wheel Improved Performance: Powerful engine upgrades, plus an all-new available 10-speed automatic transmission give Mustang even more performance, while available MagneRide™ suspension offers optimum handling; optional active valve exhaust affords complete auditory control – let the engine roar, or not LOS ANGELES, Calif., Jan. 17, 2017 – Today, Ford partnered with its ambassador of Service, Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, to introduce the new Mustang – the world’s best-selling sports coupe and the company’s most advanced Mustang ever. A host of improvements including new technology and design changes give owners ways to customize Mustang to their preferences, even better performance from more powerful engines and new MagneRide™ suspension technology. Customers have more ways than ever to personalize Mustang to make it their own, with three new paint colors, 12 distinct wheel choices and a customizable digital instrument cluster. “The new Mustang is our best ever, based on more than 50 years as one of the iconic sports car in America and now, the world,” said Joe Hinrichs, president of The Americas. “Tapping Mustang’s enormous fan base, we’re bringing the new Mustang straight to the people – and introducing the new car across multiple social media channels, reaching millions.” Ford tapped Johnson to reveal the new Mustang to the world by giving one of the first models available to a deserving member of the military. A video of the debut was launched on Johnson’s social channels, including Youtube, Instagram and Facebook, where Mustang holds the title for the most-popular car with more than 8.4 million ‘likes.’ Technology for greater personalization Mustang makes available Ford’s first 12-inch all-digital LCD screen in the dashboard. This all-new customizable instrument cluster can be easily personalized, offering three separate views. Customers can personalize the displays for normal, sport and track mode. All-new Mustang MyMode with memory function allows customers to save their favorite drive settings, including suspension and steering preferences. The new Mustang is so customizable that even its engine note can be adjusted. Delivering an audible experience like never before, an all-new active valve exhaust system is optional on Mustang GT, with a fully variable soundtrack to match the entire acceleration range. For the first time, Mustang benefits from a vast array of Ford driver-assist technology. Customers can feel more confident than ever behind the wheel with new features like Pre-Collision Assist with pedestrian detection, distance alert, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist and Driver Alert System. Ford SYNC® Connect with FordPass™ is available on Mustang for the first time. When using the FordPass® app for smartphones, drivers can start, lock, unlock and locate their car for ultimate convenience. Ultimate performance Performance is at the core of Mustang DNA, offering drivers a unique thrill of acceleration and cornering for the ultimate fun-to-drive experience. On all models, new shock absorbers make for better ride control, a new cross-axis joint in the rear suspension leads to increased lateral stiffness, and innovative stabilizer bars bring sharper response and handling. MagneRide damper technology is a new option with the Mustang Performance Package to optimize ride and handling in all situations. The proven 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder engine continues to offer outstanding performance advantages versus the outgoing 3.7-liter V6. Using Ford’s transient overboost technology uniquely calibrated for Mustang, torque is increased for wide-open throttle acceleration. Ford’s legendary 5.0-liter V8 engine has been thoroughly reworked. It is more powerful and revs higher than any Mustang GT before. This power increase was achieved with the first application for Mustang of Ford’s new dual-fuel, high-pressure direct injection and low-pressure port fuel injection on a V8 engine – delivering robust low-end torque, high-rpm power, and improved fuel efficiency. The manual transmission for both engine options has been upgraded for optimal torque. For the V8, the manual transmission has been totally redesigned to include a twin-disc clutch and dual-mass flywheel to increase torque capability and deliver more efficient clutch modulation. A new 10-speed automatic transmission, available with both EcoBoost and V8 engines, is the best automatic Mustang has ever offered. With a wide-ratio span and optimized gear spacing, this all-new gearbox helps deliver higher average power for acceleration – improving responsiveness and performance. Compared to the previous six-speed, the new 10-speed transmission has quicker shift times, better low-speed tip-in response and significantly reduced friction losses. The all-new electronic control system includes unique tunes for different drive modes and features real-time adaptive shift scheduling to ensure the right gear at the right time. Steering wheel-mounted shift paddles allow drivers maximum manual control. Energy in the design Overall, the car’s exterior design is now more athletic, with a lower, remodeled hood and grille that deliver a leaner look and refined aerodynamics, upper and lower front grilles, and a new position for hood vents. For the first time the entire Mustang line will feature all-LED front lights including signature lighting, low-beams, turn signals, efficient projector high-beams and available fog lamps. The rear of the car gets revised LED taillamps for a more technical look, plus a new bumper, fascia and available performance spoiler. Dual-tip exhaust is standard for EcoBoost® Mustang, while V8-powered Mustang GT gets a standard quad-tip exhaust. With a dozen available alloy wheel designs and fresh exterior color choices – including all-new signature Orange Fury – enthusiasts can order a Mustang with the look they’re after. Improved touch points and visual cues with a more premium look and feel characterize the new cockpit. The center console adds a new hand-stitched wrap with contrast stitching and padded knee bolsters while door handles, rings and bezels are finished in aluminum. Restyled seating surfaces feature new patterns and color choices, the instrument panel sports an updated Mustang badge and there’s a new key fob design. A heated steering wheel is optional. Ford’s most advanced Mustang ever goes on sale in North America this fall.
    0 replies | 35 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 12:33 AM
    Automatic TCU flash tuning for E9X BMW's including diesel M57's and gasoline N54/N55's is almost here. xHP is working diligently and as this demo shows their product is working. This software is not complete but you can already see the shifts are firmed up a bit. They state the following: This is an Android based TCU flashing tool. You go into the app store can flash OTS (off the shelf) maps provided by xHP. The launch for the M57 diesel models is expected next month with the N54 and then N55 motors following in March.
    0 replies | 132 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 12:05 AM
    This is different because the turbos spin and boost pressure changes at various rpm points with tuning. A manifold, intake, or headers isn't going to be asked to spin faster at 5000 rpm. The restrictions should still show. All a tune will do is optimize the curve a bit it won't suddenly change the hardware.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 12:02 AM
    Not true. Removing a hardware restriction will show on the dyno. Tuning for it obviously can better take advantage of that alleviation but if you have a restrictive exhaust and bolt up a free flowing exhaust it will show changes without tuning. Happens with intakes as well. We're talking hardware here and not software. Tuning for each manifold is asking way too much.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Sticky's Avatar
    Today, 12:01 AM
    Yes, that it clearly highlights the torque advantage of the factory manifold through a certain rev range.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Terry@BMS's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:49 PM
    We get along fine for the most part. I think some of those guys are just having a bad day or something. :) On a virtual flex fuel sensor yes it's been widely adopted by OEMs especially those equipped with widebands. But even narrow band applications can use it. I think the right logic there has the potential to be a platform game changer. When I get closer to the solution I'll post the approach in more detail for discussion. In another thread, of course. ;)
    94 replies | 808 view(s)
  • langsbr's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:29 PM
    With the combination of the JB4 and an MHD BEF, I'm fairly surprised that this wasn't at least piloted with BMS earlier. As a newbie to this platform, there must be some serious bad blood between the different vendors. It seems to me that it would be in everyone's best interest to work together, as it would simply increase sales for all. While I'm sure some people have switched completely from a JB4 to an MHD tune, there's still a vast number with just JB4 and a lot with a BEF and a JB4. Why not work together to continue that methodology? Anywho, what exactly is a 'virtual flex fuel sensor'? I thought most OEMs abandoned true ethanol sensors and simply used O2 feedback to determine if the fuel being used was ethanol based, and just modified trims and timing.
    94 replies | 808 view(s)
  • jyamona@motiv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:26 PM
    Don't worry, I haven't forgot about folks like you :)
    94 replies | 808 view(s)
  • BDKR's Avatar
    179 replies | 9683 view(s)
  • Terry@BMS's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:02 PM
    That might be true. But if the theory goes the higher flowing manifold is addressing a restriction in the system, when for a given dutycycle, we should see more boost (and thus more power), right?
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Aaron's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:55 PM
    I understand the added time of doing it, but Tony's testing will be useless without tuning for each manifold. It is ridiculous to speculate that no gains were shown based on dyno results, without tuning. Of course the manifolds are going to need to be tuned for, that's to be expected. No one expects to buy this manifold and bolt on 40rwhp without a flash revision. That'd be like me throwing on your GC's, and not tuning before a dyno run, then claiming they only added 50rwhp, and lost 20rwhp. There's no way you'd call those numbers accurate.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Terry@BMS's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:53 PM
    Interested to see some manifold shootout results provided the car is able to do consistent power numbers pull after pull. Which isn't always easy at 700whp+ levels.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Payam@BMS's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:35 PM
    I personally think the discussion was getting good and I was learning some new things. I think you might be jumping the case on Terry being "shady and unprofessional" while he was just asking some questions. It's on a public forum and he's openly doing that. I would feel it being shady doing stuff behind their back etc.
    94 replies | 808 view(s)
  • EMC's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:32 PM
    Collaboration doesn't mean "sending someone a jpeg of your logo". LOL
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Payam@BMS's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:22 PM
    I believe this is what is mainly hurting us from moving forward to bigger gains when pushing the limits 40+psi.
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
  • Dreadfox's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:19 PM
    I did read the OP, and it doesn't give any numbers for average power. Did I miss something?
    37 replies | 333 view(s)
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